Star Wars News: 'The Rise of Skywalker' Will Address the Toxic Rey-Kylo Relationship

Star Wars News: 'The Rise of Skywalker' Will Address the Toxic Rey-Kylo Relationship

Star Wars News: ‘The Rise of Skywalker’ Will Address the Toxic Rey-Kylo Relationship

Also, “Jedi” is now in the Oxford English Dictionary, and more ‘Star Wars’ rumors and news.

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NBC News president skewers Ronan Farrow in memo to staff

In an extraordinary new letter, NBC News president Noah Oppenheim says former employee Ronan Farrow is engaged in an “effort to defame NBC News.”

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Justin Trudeau: The good news – and bad – for Canada’s PM

Justin Trudeau is still PM but he lost both his majority and – by a slight margin – the popular vote.

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PH offers humanitarian aid as Japan recovers from Typhoon Hagibis – UNTV News | UNTV News – UNTV News

PH offers humanitarian aid as Japan recovers from Typhoon Hagibis – UNTV News | UNTV News UNTV News Palace unsure yet on planned US visit by Duterte INQUIRER.net Palace sends sympathies to Hagibis-battered Japan GMA News Philippines to offer humanitarian aid …

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Boris Johnson heads to EU summit as Brexit deal hangs in the balance

View the latest news and breaking news today for U.S., world, weather, entertainment, politics and health at CNN.com.

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Thousands in Germany, France protest Turkish push into Syria
Sat, October 19, 2019 02:27 EDT
BERLIN (AP) — Thousands of people in the German city of Cologne and in the French capital demonstrated Saturday against Turkey’s offensive in northern Syria.
Cologne city authorities said around 10,000 people took part in marches organized by left-wing groups. Police were out in force amid concerns about possible violence but authorities said the event was largely peaceful.
In Paris, more than 1,000 gathered at the Place de la Republique to denounce Turkey’s actions. Some displayed banners saying “The Turkish state is committing crimes against humanity in total impunity.”
Turkey’s incursion into Syria, aiming to rid the border area of Kurdish fighters as U.S. forces withdraw, has caused death and destruction and sent tens of thousands of civilians fleeing their homes.
“America has abandoned us. Everyone has abandoned us,” said Kurdish student Zade Adjoev in Paris, noting that the Kurds were on the front line as partners with the U.S.-led coalition against the Islamic State group. “When it works for them, they call us Kurds. When it doesn’t, we are terrorists.”
A member of the Kurdish Democratic Council in France, Cemile Renklicay, called Turkey a “more dangerous enemy” than the Islamic State group because the extremists “didn’t have fighter jets.”
In Cologne, some demonstrators carried flags of the Syrian Kurdish force known as the People’s Protection Units, or YPG, which Turkey is trying to push back. Others carried placards with slogans such as “No deals with the AKP regime” — a reference to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s party.
Germany is home to large Turkish and Kurdish communities, and tensions between them have turned violent in the past.

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German cabin crew union strikes at Lufthansa subsidiaries
05:10 EDT
BERLIN (AP) — A German union representing cabin crew has called members at several Lufthansa subsidiaries out on strike — a walkout that was extended by 13 hours at short notice.
The UFO union is locked in a long-running dispute with the company over pay and the legal status of the union, which has been engaged in an internal leadership struggle.
UFO initially called on members at Eurowings, Germanwings, Lufthansa CityLine and SunExpress to walk out from 5 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sunday, but on Sunday morning extended the strike to midnight, accusing the company of turning up pressure on cabin crew not to participate. Lufthansa itself wasn’t affected by Sunday’s strike.
Some flights were canceled, but it wasn’t immediately clear how many.

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Italian experts defuse WWII bomb in northern city
Sun, October 20, 2019 09:19 EDT
MILAN (AP) — Italian authorities have evacuated 4,000 people from the center of the northern city of Bolzano to defuse a World War II bomb found during construction.
The news agency ANSA said the bomb was defused during a three-hour operation Sunday morning. An alarm signaled the all-clear to reopen the city center, as well as a nearby north-south highway and a rail line connecting Italy with Austria and Germany.
The Neue Suedtiroler Tageszeitung identified the ordnance as an aerial bomb.
According to historian Ettore Frangipane, Bolzano, in the northern Alto-Adige region bordering Austria, suffered 13 major World War II bombing raids that damaged 60% of the city and killed 200 people.
Alto Adige was part of a broad swath of northern Italy that remained under Nazi-occupation long after Italy’s 1943 Allied surrender.

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UK’s Johnson asks for a Brexit delay that he doesn’t want
By MIKE CORDER and GREGORY KATZ | Sun, October 20, 2019 09:33 EDT
LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson pressed ahead Sunday with plans to try to win parliamentary backing for his new Brexit deal even as the European Union began considering his grudging request to extend the looming Brexit deadline.
As the dust settled on a day of high drama in Parliament, the next steps in Britain’s divisive, tortuous Brexit saga became clear. Monday will feature more legal action, more arm-twisting, cajoling and veiled threats by Johnson and his ministers and more amendments designed by lawmakers to stymie Johnson’s plan to have Britain leave the 28-nation bloc on Oct. 31.
In the midst of all this, EU leaders and officials across the Channel were pondering whether to grant the British leader a Brexit extension that he does not even want.
As required by law, Johnson sent an unsigned letter to the EU at the last possible moment late Saturday seeking a delay to Britain’s impending Oct. 31 departure. But he followed it with a signed letter indicating that he does not favor another Brexit extension.
“My view, and the government’s position, (is) that a further extension would damage the interests of the U.K. and our EU partners, and the relationship between us,” Johnson wrote to European Council President Donald Tusk.
Johnson has long declared that he plans to take the U.K. out of the EU on Oct. 31 with or without a divorce deal, and his minister in charge of Brexit again emphasized that stance.
“We are going to leave by Oct. 31st,” Michael Gove told Sky News on Sunday. “We have the means and the ability to do so.”
The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, said Tusk would consult with other leaders “in the next days” about Johnson’s request, but most signs indicate the EU would prefer an extension to an abrupt no-deal Brexit.
Finnish Prime Minister Antti Rinne, whose country holds the European Union’s rotating presidency, said Sunday “it makes sense to allow extra time.”
At home, British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said he believes Johnson has enough support to get his deal through Parliament, but added the government would keep talking with its Northern Ireland ally, the Democratic Unionist Party, to persuade it to back the deal. So far, the party, which holds 10 seats in Parliament, has refused to support Johnson’s deal because it treats Northern Ireland differently than other parts of the U.K.
“We’ll keep talking to the DUP and see if there’s any further reassurances that can be provided,” Raab told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show.
Johnson’s Conservative party has only 288 seats in the 650-seat House of Commons, so he needs the support of some opposition lawmakers.
While the Conservatives are focused on getting more votes, the opposition Labour Party was in favor of a second referendum on the whole question of leaving the EU.
Labour’s Brexit spokesman Keir Starmer told the BBC it is “inevitable” that lawmakers opposed to Brexit will put forward an amendment seeking a second referendum — something strongly opposed by Johnson and his government.
“Whether it’s this deal or any future deal, it’s got to go back so the public can say, ‘Do you want to leave on these terms?'” Starmer said. “If so, then we do. If not, we remain.”
Johnson’s letters came after another tumultuous day in the House of Commons, which worked in a Saturday session for only the first time since the Falklands War in 1982. For hours, British lawmakers issued both ringing endorsements and scathing condemnations of Johnson’s Brexit deal, only to kick any decision on it down the road by passing an amendment withholding approval for the deal until laws enabling it are passed. That could take days, or even weeks.
While Johnson insists on sticking to the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline, lawmakers are trying to avoid a no-deal Brexit, which economists say would wreak damage on the U.K. economy.
Heaping more pressure on lawmakers to back Johnson’s deal, Gove also said British government is triggering contingency plans to mitigate the disruption s expected if the country leaves the EU without a deal. He did not explain what that would entail.
And in court, Johnson could face legal challenges from opponents who feel that sending his second letter to the EU was done specifically to frustrate the will of Parliament.
The Court of Session in Scotland is already considering the matter and it may end up being decided in the British Supreme Court, which in September ruled that Johnson had acted unlawfully when he suspended Parliament for five weeks as the Brexit deadline crept closer.
Scottish National Party legislator Joanna Cherry, part of a group that brought the earlier successful case against Johnson, said the legal battle over Brexit continues.
“We’re back in court on Monday morning and it will be possible then to secure the court’s assistance if the prime minister has flouted the law and the promises he gave to the court,” she said.
___
Sam Petrequin in Brussels and Jari Tanner in Helsinki contributed.
___
This story corrects the number of Conservative seats to 288, not 233.
___
Follow AP’s full coverage of Brexit and British politics at https://www.apnews.com/Brexit

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Swiss choose new parliament, vote could see Green gains
04:13 EDT
BERLIN (AP) — Voters in Switzerland are electing a new national parliament, with recent polls suggesting that green parties could fare well in a year when environmental concerns have swept across Europe.
The election for the 200 members of the National Council, parliament’s lower house, and 46 members of the Council of States, the upper house, could offer the latest sign of how fears about climate change impact European voting.
Balloting ends at midday Sunday. Most Swiss voters cast ballots by mail.
The wealthy Alpine country of 8.2 million has a stable political landscape, with a broad coalition of parties ranging from the left to the right-wing populist Swiss People’s Party — the biggest party in the outgoing parliament — represented in the governing Federal Council. It doesn’t include the two green parties.

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Cars Aren't Going Anywhere, and More Transportation News This Week

Cars Aren’t Going Anywhere, and More Transportation News This Week

Plus, we investigate a new, tiny jet engine for cargo-touting drones, and check out Volvo’s first electric car.

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Trump’s Pelosi Tweet Tops This Week’s Internet News Roundup

The president’s attack didn’t quite go over as planned. Also, Lady Gaga wants to know what Fortnite is.

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The Trump Impeachment Inquiry: Latest News

The death of Elijah E. Cummings Jr., one of the leaders of the impeachment inquiry, casts a shadow over the proceedings. But Gordon Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union, is still expected to testify.

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WSJ: Facebook’s news tab could launch by the end of the month

While Mark Zuckerberg gives speeches about not wanting Facebook to be the arbiter of truth, the Wall Street Journal reports his company is setting up deals to launch its dedicated tab for news. In a post earlier this year, the CEO said “It’s important to me t…

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News legends’ dire warning about Trump

Dan Rather and Sam Donaldson tell CNN’s Don Lemon that they think that President Donald Trump is dangerous for the country because Trump is only interested in protecting himself.

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Corrections: October 22, 2019

Corrections: October 22, 2019

Corrections appearing in print on Tuesday, October 22, 2019.

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Lights, Camera, Bathrooms: Televising the Largest Debate Field Ever

Speaking time. Restroom proximity. With 12 candidates onstage, CNN faced unique challenges with the Democratic debate.

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Ole Miss Honors Student Wears Blackface, Prompts Warning

A University of Mississippi honors student has reported himself to the college for posting a photo in which he is wearing blackface, prompting the school to issue a warning about costumes.

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A Pregnancy Scandal

The problem here is not Elizabeth Warren.

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Corrections: September 24, 2019

Corrections appearing in print on Tuesday, September 24, 2019.

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EarthLink – News

EarthLink – News

AP PHOTOS: 10 days on the Turkish border with Syria
Sat, October 19, 2019 03:59 EDT
CEYLANPINAR, Turkey (AP) — Turkey’s 10-day incursion into Syria, aiming to rid the border area of Kurdish fighters, caused deaths and destruction on both sides and sent tens of thousands of civilians fleeing their homes.
As Turkish and Turkish-backed Syrian opposition forces battled the Kurdish-led fighters, Associated Press photographers worked to get images out to the world despite obstacles including disruption of communications networks, hostility to international media and sporadic shelling.
They provided powerful visual coverage of the military buildup on the Turkish side of the border, early scenes of troops crossing into Syria and the chaotic scene of a mortar attack in the Turkish town of Akcakale.
Elsewhere, AP pictures showed the reality for families forced to flee the region, the funerals of civilians killed by shelling and children witnessing fighting close to their homes.
According to the Kurdish Red Crescent, 44 civilians were killed and 171 wounded since the attack began on Oct. 9. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human puts the death toll higher, saying 86 people have been killed, including 21 children. Turkey says a total of 20 civilians were killed by shelling inside Turkey, while six Turkish soldiers and 74 Turkish-backed Syrian opposition fighters were killed in the fighting.
An agreement was reached Thursday night to halt the fighting for five days, but Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said that unless Kurdish-led fighters withdraw “without exception” from a zone 30 kilometers (20 miles) deep in Syria running the entire 440-kilometer (260-mile) length of the border, Turkish forces will resume fighting on Tuesday.
There has been no immediate sign of any pullout by the Kurdish-led forces, who say the deal covers a smaller section of the border, about 125 kilometers (75 miles) and that they haven’t committed to a pullout.

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The Latest: UK minister: No-deal Brexit preparations gear up
Sun, October 20, 2019 08:30 EDT
LONDON (AP) — The Latest on Britain’s impending departure from the European Union (all times local):
1:25 p.m.
The British minister in charge of Brexit preparations says contingency plans are being “triggered” to cope with the disruptions expected if the country crashes out of the European Union without a divorce deal.
Michael Gove tells Sky News that “we are preparing to ensure that, if no extension is granted, we have done everything possible in order to prepare to leave without a deal.”
His comments Sunday come after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson reluctantly asked for an extension to Britain’s scheduled Oct. 31 departure from the EU.
Gove’s move could be designed to pressure British lawmakers into supporting Johnson’s Brexit deal.
The U.K. government warned earlier this year that in a worst-case scenario, a no-deal Brexit could lead to disruptions including long traffic jams at ports, shortages of food and medicines and problems for travelers.
___
12:45 p.m.
The prime minister of Finland, whose country holds the European Union’s rotating presidency, says “it makes sense to allow extra time” for London to deal with the negotiated Brexit agreement to avoid a no-deal Brexit.
Johnson sent an unsigned letter to the European Union late Saturday seeking a delay to Britain’s impending Oct. 31 departure from the bloc, as required by British law, to Jan. 31, 2020. But he followed it with a signed letter indicating that he does not favor another Brexit extension, which he says would be against the interests of EU and British citizens as well as businesses.
Finnish Prime Minister Antti Rinne says Sunday that “Finland, along with other EU nations, attaches great importance to the approval of the departure agreement negotiated with Britain.”
Rinne said the president of the European Council, Donald Tusk, will talk with the EU’s 27 leaders about the British request to delay Brexit.
___
11:10 a.m.
The opposition Labour Party’s Brexit spokesman has re-emphasized his party’s support for a second referendum on Britain’s divorce deal with the European Union.
Keir Starmer told the BBC on Sunday that “whatever deal gets through, it should be subject to a referendum.”
His comments come a day after Parliament forced Prime Minister Boris Johnson to seek an extension to the Oct. 31 deadline for Britain to leave the EU. That came after the postponement Saturday of a vote on Johnson’s Brexit deal, which he agreed on with EU leaders on Thursday.
Starmer says what Labour is seeking now is that “this deal in particular but any deal is put up against remain in a referendum.”
Hundreds of thousands of people marched through London on Saturday demanding a “people’s vote” on Brexit.
___
10:40 a.m.
The European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, has met with EU ambassadors to discuss the consequences of the letter sent by British Prime minister Boris Johnson asking for a Brexit extension.
Asked Sunday after the meeting in Brussels whether EU leaders would be open to granting a new Brexit delay, Barnier just said EU Council President Donald Tusk would hold consultations “in the next days.”
Barnier said it was “a very short and normal meeting” to “launch the next steps of the EU ratification of the agreement.”
Johnson sent an unsigned letter to the European Union late Saturday seeking a delay to Britain’s impending Oct. 31 departure from the bloc, as required by British law. But he followed it with a signed letter indicating that he does not favor another Brexit extension.
Johnson very much wants Britain to leave the bloc on Oct. 31 but British lawmakers have not yet voted on his new Brexit plan.
___
10:20 a.m.
A German minister is calling on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to seek a cross-party solution to the Brexit standoff and says he wouldn’t have a problem with delaying Britain’s departure from the European Union for a few weeks.
Economy Minister Peter Altmaier, a member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party, was Quote: d Sunday as telling German daily Bild that “a good and orderly solution is still possible if Boris Johnson now reaches out to Parliament and seeks a cross-party solution.”
He says Britain’s continued political “power poker” game over Brexit endangers jobs and prosperity, and “if an extension by a few weeks is necessary, I wouldn’t have a problem with it.”
The European Union has not yet responded to Johnson’s grudging request late Saturday to extend the looming Oct. 31 deadline for Britain to leave the bloc.
___
10 a.m.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is facing a legal challenge from opponents over his Brexit plan.
Johnson sent an unsigned letter to the European Union late Saturday seeking a delay to Britain’s impending departure from the bloc, as required by law. But he followed it with a signed letter indicating that he does not favor another Brexit extension.
EU officials have not responded to the request and say consultations are underway.
Opponents feel that sending the second letter was done specifically to frustrate the will of Parliament, which has not approved Johnson’s Brexit plan but does want a Brexit deal.
The Court of Session in Scotland is already considering the matter, and it may end up being decided in the British Supreme Court, which in September ruled that Johnson had acted unlawfully when he suspended Parliament for five weeks as the Brexit deadline crept closer.
Scottish National Party legislator Joanna Cherry said the legal battle over Brexit resumes Monday to see “if the prime minister has flouted the law and the promises he gave to the court.”
___
9 a.m.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is pressing ahead to try to win parliamentary backing for his new Brexit deal even as the European Union considers his grudging request to extend the looming Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.
Johnson sent an unsigned letter to the EU late Saturday seeking a delay to Britain’s impending departure from the bloc, as required by law. But he followed it with a signed letter indicating that he does not favor another Brexit extension.
EU officials have not responded to the request and say consultations are underway. The formal granting or denial of an extension by the bloc may not be made until the Brexit deadline is just a few days away, but most signs indicate the EU would prefer an extension to an abrupt U.K. departure from the bloc without a deal in place.
Johnson has been determined to take the country out of the 28-nation bloc on Oct. 31, but lawmakers are trying to avoid a no-deal Brexit, which economists say would wreak damage on the U.K. economy.
___
Follow AP’s full coverage of Brexit and British politics at https://www.apnews.com/Brexit

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Bolivians pick between Evo Morales and change in tight vote
By PAOLA FLORES and CARLOS VALDEZ | Sun, October 20, 2019 08:39 EDT
LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — South America’s longest-serving leader was seeking an unprecedented fourth term in Bolivian elections on Sunday, but polls suggested Evo Morales is in the tightest race of his career.
The 59-year-old leftist, who cast his vote shortly after polls opened, was favored to win the first round vote, but he was likely to be forced into a December runoff where he could be vulnerable to a united opposition.
The son of impoverished Aymara shepherds, Morales came to prominence leading social protests and won election as Bolivia’s first indigenous president in 2006.
He allied himself with a leftist bloc of Latin American leaders and used revenues from the Andean country’s natural gas and minerals to redistribute wealth among the masses and lift millions out of poverty in the region’s poorest country. The economy has grown by an annual average of about 4.5%, well above the regional average.
The son of Aymara Indian shepherds has also been credited for battling racial inequalities.
Many Bolivians, such as Celestino Aguirre, a 64-year-old vendor, still identify with Morales, saying people shouldn’t criticize him so much. “It’s not against Evo, it’s against me, against the poor people, against the humble.”
But Morales also has faced growing dissatisfaction even among his indigenous supporters. Some are frustrated by corruption scandals linked to his administration — though not Morales himself — and many by his refusal to accept a referendum on limiting presidential terms. While Bolivians voted to maintain term limits in 2016, the country’s top court — seen by critics as friendly to the president — ruled that limits would violate Morales’ political rights as a citizen.
“I’m thinking of a real change because I think that Evo Morales has done what he had to do and should leave by the front door,” said Nicolás Choque, a 27-year-old car washer.
Mauricio Parra, 40, who administers a building in downtown La Paz, said he voted for Morales in 2006 as a reaction against previous center-right governments.
“He did very well those four years. … (But) in his second term there were problems of corruption, drug trafficking, nepotism and other strange things” that led Parra to vote against repealing term limits in the 2016 referendum. “He hasn’t respected that. That is the principle reason that I’m not going to vote for Evo Morales.”
He said he was backing Morales’ closest rival, former President Carlos Mesa, a 66-year-old journalist and historian who, as vice president, rose to the nation’s top post when his predecessor resigned in 2003 amid widespread protests. He then stepped aside himself in 2005 amid renewed demonstrations led by Morales, who was then leader of the coca growers’ union.
An Oct. 4-6 poll by the San Andres Higher University and other institutions showed Morales apparently leading Mesa, 32% to 27% heading into the first round of voting, with the rest split among other candidates.
That would set up a runoff, and the poll showed Morales and Mesa practically tied at just under 36% each in a two-way race — with the rest of those surveyed saying they were undecided, would cast a null ballot or declining to state a preference. The poll surveyed 14,420 people and the margin of error was 2.82 percentage points.
Bolivians will also elect all of the 166 congressional seats. Polls project that no party would have a majority in Congress, which could lead to an impasse for the upcoming administration.

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After delay, New Orleans to demolish cranes at hotel site
By REBECCA SANTANA | Sun, October 20, 2019 01:27 EDT
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — After two days of delays, New Orleans officials are hoping to use a series of controlled explosions Sunday to take down two cranes that have been leaning precariously over the remains of a partially collapsed hotel.
Officials had originally planned to topple the cranes Friday, then pushed back the demolition to Saturday and then to Sunday when officials said the cranes were more damaged than previously thought. Workers have been going up in a basket to place explosives on the crane and assess the situation.
“As they got up and got closer they found out some things about it that have changed the way they are going to take it down … and that’s going to take a little longer for them to accomplish,” he said. “The cranes are more damaged than they thought.”
The demolition will take place no earlier than noon Sunday.
The Hard Rock Hotel under construction at the edge of the historic French Quarter partially collapsed on Oct. 12, killing three workers and sending debris into the street. Clouds of dust billowed up as workers inside ran from the building that day.
While the rest of the building will also have to be dealt with, the cranes — one around 270 feet (82 meters) high, the other about 300 feet (91 meters) — have been the more immediate point of concern. Experts, including engineers who worked on demolitions following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, were called in to try to come up with a plan to clear the site and prevent the cranes falling on their own, at risk of further injury and damage.
On Thursday, officials announced plans to attach explosives to the cranes. If the plans succeed, the towers will drop vertically and spare nearby buildings such as the Saenger Theatre and the New Orleans Athletic Club, both built in the 1920s, and a key gas line that runs under the street.
“We’ve told you that this is a very dangerous building. The cranes are still in a precarious situation,” McConnell said.
McConnell said at least one of the cranes on Saturday was leaning more than the day before.
“It shifted and didn’t come back, which tells me it’s weakening,” he said.
Two bodies remain in the hotel’s unstable wreckage and Mayor LaToya Cantrell said recovering the remains would be a priority once the cranes are down.
Officials said Saturday that they would give residents who needed to evacuate four hours’ notice ahead of Sunday’s planned demolition. They will also have a wider exclusion zone in which people must remain indoors.
Officials have repeatedly stressed that fluidity of the situation and that they are adjusting as necessary, depending on the information they are getting from experts on the scene.
On Saturday, workers suspended in a basket held by a crane could be seen high over the wreckage, working on the cranes. Down below, streets in one of the busiest parts of town were closed off and tents were set up in the center of Canal Street, where the city’s famous red streetcars usually roll back and forth.
Tourists, employees and residents milled about taking photos, but officials stressed that they do not want people approaching the site to watch the demolition.
“We prefer people to not be out here when this thing happens,” McConnell said. “It’s a dangerous operation.”
The cause of the collapse remains unknown. Cantrell and McConnell said evidence gathering began soon after the collapse, and lawsuits have already been filed against the project’s owners and contractors.

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Nestor heads into Georgia after tornados damage Florida
By BRENDAN FARRINGTON and TERRY SPENCER | Sat, October 19, 2019 09:22 EDT
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Nestor raced across Georgia as a post-tropical cyclone late Saturday, hours after the former tropical storm spawned a tornado that damaged homes and a school in central Florida while sparing areas of the Florida Panhandle devastated one year earlier by Hurricane Michael.
The storm made landfall Saturday on St. Vincent Island, a nature preserve off Florida’s northern Gulf Coast in a lightly populated area of the state, the National Hurricane Center said.
Nestor was expected to bring 1 to 3 inches of rain to drought-stricken inland areas on its march across a swath of the U.S. Southeast. Forecasters said it also was raising an overnight threat of severe weather in the Carolinas as it continued to speed toward the Atlantic Ocean.
While all tropical storm and surge warnings had been canceled by Saturday afternoon in Florida, the storm escalated weekend threats of possible twisters and severe thunderstorms elsewhere in the South.
The storm spun off at least three tornadoes in Florida as it moved north through the Gulf that caused damage.
The Polk County Sheriff’s Office said several homes were damaged and Kathleen Middle School had a large section of its roof torn off when the tornado hit late Friday near Lakeland, about an hour’s drive southwest of Orlando.
Photos posted by The Ledger newspaper showed a home with a destroyed roof, downed trees, a large recreational vehicle thrown onto its side and vehicles buried under debris. About 10,000 homes were without power Saturday.
“Thankfully, we have not had any reported serious injuries,” Sheriff Grady Judd said in a Saturday statement. “However, there are many people dealing with damage to their homes and property this morning, some of it severe.”
Another suspected tornado in southwest Florida damaged at least a dozen homes in Cape Coral, some severely, the police department said in a statement. No injuries were reported. Another tornado was reported in Pinellas County, producing minor damage at a mobile home park.
In Georgia, remnants of the storm spread heavy rains and triggered two National Weather Service warnings of potential twisters in the state’s south on Saturday evening. Radar indicated possible tornados separately in areas around Rhine and Vienna, Georgia. But there was no immediate confirmation of any tornadoes and no injuries or damages were reported.
Elsewhere, news outlets reported some downed trees and power lines in metro Atlanta as heavy rains spread across Georgia. Photographs showed downed trees blocking some roadways.
In Mexico Beach, Florida, where a powerful October 2018 storm nearly wiped out that Panhandle town and left thousands homeless, the mayor said Saturday that Nestor brought some needed rain to a portion of the state suffering from drought. But there was no damage there.
“There have been no issues,” said Mayor Al Cathey, whose city is still recovering from Michael. “I would call us fortunate.”
____
Spencer reported from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

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2019 Had the Smallest Ozone Hole on Record, No Thanks to Us

2019 Had the Smallest Ozone Hole on Record, No Thanks to Us

In 2019, good news is in short supply, let alone news showing we can actually solve a pressing global problem. So folks, savor this: The ozone hole hit its smallest maximum extent ever recorded. It just, uh, comes with a tiny caveat. Read more…

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Opinion: Fox News fans will get more of what they want, Trump propaganda

The viewers will get more of what they want from Fox News: a full-throated defense of the president, without any of Shepard Smith’s throat-clearing, writes Bill Carter, a media analyst for CNN.

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Every Single Person Who Has Resigned or Been Fired From the Trump Administration

On Thursday, amid reports of his involvement in Trump’s conversation with Ukraine’s president, Energy Secretary Rick Perry announced he would step down by the end of this year; this news comes just one week after acting Homeland Security Secretary, Kevin McA…

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2019 Volkswagen Arteon – Victoria News

A new hatchback becomes VW’s new top-flight passenger car

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Everything you need to know before getting the flu shot – Victoria News – Victoria News

Everything you need to know before getting the flu shot – Victoria News Victoria News Shoppers Drug Mart pharmacists encourage flu vaccination – Kelowna News Castanet.net View full coverage on Google News

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CNN's Brian Stelter calls out ABC News' gun-range video error: Network 'has not explained what happened'

CNN’s Brian Stelter calls out ABC News’ gun-range video error: Network ‘has not explained what happened’

“Let’s talk about the most egregious media error of the week,” he said during “Reliable Sources.” “This involves ABC News, showing video from a gun range in Kentucky that they said was video of a slaughter in Syria.” “It’s actually from a Kentucky gun range,” Stelter added. “Now ABC says it regrets the error, but it has not explained what happened.”
The network issued a correction Monday after reportedly using video from the Knob Creek Gun Range in West Point, while the words “CRISIS IN SYRIA. ISIS prisoners escape as death toll rises in attacks,” appeared beneath it.
The footage first aired on Sunday 's “World News Tonight” as anchor Tom Llamas claimed it showed a Turkish attack on a group of Kurdish civilians in a Syrian border town.
Both “Good Morning America” and “World News Tonight” issued an identical statement on Twitter expressing regret over the mistake.
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Thai king strips consort of titles for disloyalty – BBC News

Thai king strips consort of titles for ‘disloyalty’ 21 October 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright EPA Image caption Sineenat Wongvajirapakdi, pictured here piloting a fighter jet, was appointed the king’s royal consort in July Thailand’s King Vajiralongkorn has stripped his royal consort of her rank and titles for “misbehaviour and disloyalty against the monarch”.
An official announcement said Sineenat Wongvajirapakdi had been “ambitious” and tried to “elevate herself to the same state as the queen”.
“The royal consort’s behaviours were considered disrespectful,” it said.
She was appointed in July, just two months after the king married Queen Suthida, his fourth wife.
Sineenat, who was a major-general and is a trained pilot, nurse and bodyguard, was the first person to be awarded the title of Royal Noble Consort in nearly a century.
Queen Suthida – a 41-year-old former flight attendant and deputy head of his bodyguard unit – is King Vajiralongkorn’s long-term partner and has been seen with him in public for many years. Thailand country profile
The announcement that Sineenat had been stripped of her titles was published in the Royal Gazette on Monday. It marked a sudden fall from grace for the royal consort, who for several years was seen often at the side of King Vajiralongkorn.
Even after the king’s marriage to Queen Suthida, Sineenart was a regular guest at royal events. What did the palace say?
The statement published on Monday said Sineenat had “shown resistance and pressure in every manner to stop the appointment of the Queen” ahead of the coronation in May.
“The king gave her a royal consort position, in hopes of relieving the pressure and a problem that could affect the monarchy,” the statement said. Image copyright Reuters Image caption King Vajiralongkorn and his consort pose at the Grand Palace in Bangkok Image copyright Reuters Image caption Sineenat had held the military rank of major general
It also accused the royal consort of “resistance against the king and the queen” and of abusing her power to give orders on the king’s behalf.
The king, the statement said, had learnt “she neither was grateful to the title bestowed upon her, nor did she behave appropriately according to her status”.
He ordered her stripped of all royal titles, decorations, status in the royal guard and her military ranks.
King Vajiralongkorn ascended the throne after the death of his father in 2016. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The king is seen pouring sacred water on the head of Queen Suthida when they were married in May What about the king’s wives?
He has had four wives – Princess Soamsawali from 1977 to 1993; Yuvadhida Polpraserth from 1994 to 1996; Srirasmi Suwadee between 2001 and 2014; and Queen Suthida.
The true cause of Sineenart’s removal as royal consort may never be made public, given the secrecy which cloaks palace affairs in Thailand. The nation’s lese-majeste law forbids any insult of the monarchy and is among the strictest in the world. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Sasiwimon was jailed in 2015 for insulting Thailand’s monarchy
The removal of Sineenat echoes the cases of two of the King’s former wives. In 1996, he denounced his second wife, who fled to the United States, and disowned four sons he had with her.
In 2014, his third wife Srirasmi Suwadee was similarly stripped of all her titles and banished from court. Her 14-year-old son has been raised by King Vajiralongkorn in Germany and Switzerland.
The King has also exercised his royal powers in a more direct way than his recent predecessors. Earlier this month, the two most important army units in the capital, Bangkok were placed directly under his command – a concentration of military power in royal hands unprecedented in modern Thailand. Related Topics

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More storms approaching Japan | NHK WORLD-JAPAN News

Japanese weather officials are warning of possible fresh flooding in areas hit by downpours caused by the recent Typhoon Hagibis, as severe tropical storm Neoguri approaches Japan.
The Meteorological Agency says that, as of 9 a.m. on Monday, Neoguri was southeast of Tanegashima Island in southwestern Japan and moving northeast at a speed of 45 kilometers per hour.
Winds of up to about 110 kilometers per hour are blowing near its center, with maximum gusts of around 160 kilometers per hour.
The storm is expected to move along Japan’s Pacific coast after turning into a low pressure system on Monday night or later.
Strong winds and high waves are likely in many parts of eastern and western Japan into Tuesday. Extremely heavy rain may fall in limited areas.
In a 24-hour period, 300 millimeters of rain is expected in Tokai, 200 millimeters in Kansai, and 150 millimeters in Shikoku and on the Izu Islands. More rain is forecast in the next 24 hours.
Weather officials also say powerful typhoon Bualoi is likely to approach the Ogasawara Islands between Thursday and Friday and reach waters east of Kanto on Saturday after turning into a low pressure area.

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Beef Recall In NJ At ShopRite, Elsewhere: Possible E. Coli | Ridgewood, NJ

health & fitness Beef Recall In NJ At ShopRite, Elsewhere: Possible E. Coli Federal officials have issued a public health alert for possible E. Coli-contaminated beef sold at ShopRite and other stores. By Tom Davis, Patch Staff Oct 18, 2019 9:28 am ET | Updated Oct 19, 2019 12:24 pm ET {{ replyButtonLabel }} Reply {{ replyCount }} (US Department of Agriculture) (US Department of Agriculture) (US Department of Agriculture) NEW JERSEY – Federal officials have issued a public health alert for possible E. Coli-contaminated beef in New Jersey and elsewhere, including hamburger patties sold at ShopRite.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service is issuing a public health alert for beef products derived from imported beef from Ontario, Canada because it may be contaminated with E. Coli, according to a news release.
Federal officials are concerned that some products may be in school or consumers’ freezers. Schools or consumers who have these products are urged not to serve them and throw them away.
E. Coli a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness, according to the release.
The following products have been identified as part of the Canadian recall and were distributed to institutions and retailers in Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont: ( View Labels )
10-pound cardboard box packages containing bulk plastic wrapped raw frozen ground beef gyros labeled “DEVANCO FOODS CHICAGO’S FAVORITE” GYROS SLICES (STRIPS) with a case code 159 19. 10-pound cardboard box packages containing bulk plastic wrapped raw frozen ground beef gyros labeled “KRONOS HALAL GYROS STRIPS” HALAL CERTIFIED BEEF GYROS UNCOOKED, IQF STRIPS with a case code 19 159. Retail sized (8 patties) cardboard box packages containing “ZIYAD PREMIUM QUALITY Beef Hamburger Patties” with a case code 911541.021541. Retail sized (8 kabobs) cardboard box packages containing “ZIYAD PREMIUM QUALITY Uncooked Kufta Kabob” with a case code 911154.021154. 2-pound cardboard box packages containing plastic wrapped raw frozen ground beef patties labeled “LANDIS BRAND 100% ALL BEEF PATTIES 8 Quarter Pound Patties” and a sell by date of 060720. 8-pound cardboard box packages containing bulk plastic wrapped raw frozen ground beef patties labeled “Shop Right 100% PURE QUARTER POUND Ground Beef Hamburgers” and a sell by date of 060720. 3-pound cardboard box packages containing plastic wrapped raw frozen ground beef patties labeled “Shop Right 100% PURE Ground Beef Hamburgers” and a sell by date of 060720. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has conducted a food safety investigation and determined that certain products produced by the company may be contaminated. While Canada is the recalling authority, federal officials are amplifying the recall through this public health alert, the release said.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency notified federal officials that several shipments of beef implicated in a series of recalls have been exported to the U.S., the release said.
Federal officials have identified that imported beef manufacturing trimmings produced on May 27 and 30, 2019 that are subject to recall were used in the U.S. to produce other beef products distributed for retail sale, the release said.
The U.S. companies that produced these beef products have received notice of the recall from Ryding-Regency. However, retail consumers may not have received such notification.
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Baker Bros profits $730 million from Seattle Genetics stock spike – Business Insider

A scientist works at Zai Lab’s drug development facility in Shanghai, China October 18, 2017. Reuters Investment firm Baker Bros. Advisors profited $730 million Monday after its stake in Seattle Genetics soared on positive drug news, according to Bloomberg data . The biotech company’s tucatinib treatment surpassed expectations in a recent breast cancer study and improved the condition for patients whose cancer had reached their brains, the company said . Baker Bros. held a 29% stake in the company as of June 30, a position now worth about $5 billion after the positive drug news. Watch Seattle Genetics trade live here .
Investment firm Baker Bros. Advisors netted a $730 million profit Monday after its stake in Seattle Genetics shot through the roof on positive drug news, according to Bloomberg data .
Seattle Genetics traded as much as 18% higher Monday after a breast cancer study found its tucatinib treatment successfully countered the spread of cancer cells. The treatment posted better-than-expected improvements for patients whose cancer had reached their brains, the company said in a release .
Baker Bros. held a 29% stake in the biotech company as of June 30, according to Bloomberg, a position worth about $5 billion after the positive drug news. Seattle Genetics is the firm’s largest holding.
Read more: WeWork’s IPO woes are bleeding into the biotech market — and health startups’ plans to go public now look dimmer
Seattle Genetics stock is up roughly 79% year-to-date. Its Monday peak of $101.95 per share was a record high for the stock.
The biotech company has 12 “buy” ratings, five “hold” ratings, and one “sell” rating, with a consensus price target of $90.13, according to Bloomberg data.
The company’s consensus price target jumped nearly 5% after Monday’s news prompted a series of upgrades.
Now read more markets coverage from Markets Insider and Business Insider:

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Meatballs Like You Haven’t Seen Them

Meatballs Like You Haven’t Seen Them

Alison Roman likes them nicely crisped, without the sogginess that comes from tomato sauce or gravy.

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WH Smith to Buy Marshall Retail for $400 Million in U.S. Airports Push

British retailer WH Smith Plc made its second major foray into U.S. airports on Thursday with a $400 million purchase of Marshall Retail Group, expanding in a fast-growing segment and sending its shares up 5%.

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How the Climate Kids Are Short-Circuiting Right-Wing Media

Young people like Greta Thunberg are participating in the culture wars while also managing to float above the fray.

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Asian Shares Tick Up, Sterling Off Five-Month Peak as Crunch Brexit Talks Eyed

Asian shares inched higher while sterling came off five-month highs in volatile trade on Wednesday as investors looked to whether Britain can secure a deal to avoid a disorderly exit from the European Union.

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Prince Harry Goes to Battle With Tabloids, Rupturing an Old Relationship

He has begun legal proceedings against The Sun and The Daily Mirror, accusing them of phone hacking. The case is an extraordinary break from the royal practice, “Never complain, never explain.”

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