'One family' behind Indonesia blasts – BBC News

‘One family’ behind Indonesia blasts – BBC News

Police chief Tito Karnavian said the family belonged to an Indonesian IS-inspired network, Jemaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD). What do we know about Sunday’s attack?
The father drove a bomb-laden car into the grounds of Surabaya Centre Pentecostal Church, police said.
The mother and her two daughters – aged 9 and 12 – had bombs strapped to them and blew themselves up at Diponegoro Indonesian Christian Church.
The family’s sons – aged 16 and 18 – rode motorcycles into Santa Maria Catholic Church, and detonated explosives they were carrying. It was their attack that came first, at around 07:30 local time (00:30 GMT). The other two attacks followed five minutes apart, police said, according to the Jakarta Post.
Officials reportedly foiled attacks against other churches. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Police helped people looking for missing loved ones after the attacks
Visiting the scene of one of the bombings, President Joko Widodo described the attacks as “barbaric”, adding that he had ordered police to “look into and break up networks of perpetrators”.
Also on Sunday, police said they killed four suspected members of JAD in Cianjur, West Java, and arrested two others. Rising intolerance
By BBC Indonesia Editor Rebecca Henschke
The blasts were co-ordinated to hit those coming to morning services and were over within the space of just 10 minutes.
In recent years women have become increasingly active in terrorist cells in Indonesia but this would be the first time children have been used.
Indonesia had been widely praised for its sustained anti-terrorism crackdown following the 2002 Bali bombings. It has managed a seemingly successful combination of arrests and killings, alongside a de-radicalisation program that focused on changing minds and providing alternative incomes for released terrorists.
But the rise of IS overseas has invigorated the loosely constituted jihadi networks.
There has also been rising intolerance in recent years in this once tolerant, pluralist, majority-Muslim nation, which has made minority groups increasingly uncomfortable. How does this compare to previous attacks?
This appears to be the worst attack linked to IS in Indonesia.
The group claimed its first attack in the country in January 2016, when four civilians were killed in a series of explosions and shootings in the capital Jakarta.
It has also claimed other attacks, such as violence earlier this month in a high-security prison near Jakarta, in which five members of security forces were killed.
But the country’s deadliest jihadist attacks predate IS.
In 2002, over 200 people were killed in two bombings carried out by al-Qaeda-linked militants outside a bar and nightclub on the island of Bali, a popular tourist destination.
In May 2005, bomb blasts killed 22 on the island of Sulawesi. Less than six months later, a suicide bombing in Bali killed 20. Related Topics

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‘One family’ behind Indonesia blasts – BBC News

Police chief Tito Karnavian said the family belonged to an Indonesian IS-inspired network, Jemaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD). What do we know about Sunday’s attack? The father drove a bomb-laden car into the grounds of Surabaya Centre Pentecostal Church, police said. The mother and her two daughters – aged 9 and 12 – had bombs strapped to them and blew themselves up at Diponegoro Indonesian Christian Church. The family’s sons – aged 16 and 18 – rode motorcycles into Santa Maria Catholic Church, and detonated explosives they were carrying. It was their attack that came first, at around 07:30 local time (00:30 GMT). The other two attacks followed five minutes apart, police said, according to the Jakarta Post. Officials reportedly foiled attacks against other churches. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Police helped people looking for missing loved ones after the attacks Visiting the scene of one of the bombings, President Joko Widodo described the attacks as “barbaric”, adding that he had ordered police to “look into and break up networks of perpetrators”. Also on Sunday, police said they killed four suspected members of JAD in Cianjur, West Java, and arrested two others. Rising intolerance By BBC Indonesia Editor Rebecca Henschke The blasts were co-ordinated to hit those coming to morning services and were over within the space of just 10 minutes. In recent years women have become increasingly active in terrorist cells in Indonesia but this would be the first time children have been used. Indonesia had been widely praised for its sustained anti-terrorism crackdown following the 2002 Bali bombings. It has managed a seemingly successful combination of arrests and killings, alongside a de-radicalisation program that focused on changing minds and providing alternative incomes for released terrorists. But the rise of IS overseas has invigorated the loosely constituted jihadi networks. There has also been rising intolerance in recent years in this once tolerant, pluralist, majority-Muslim nation, which has made minority groups increasingly uncomfortable. How does this compare to previous attacks? This appears to be the worst attack linked to IS in Indonesia. The group claimed its first attack in the country in January 2016, when four civilians were killed in a series of explosions and shootings in the capital Jakarta. It has also claimed other attacks, such as violence earlier this month in a high-security prison near Jakarta, in which five members of security forces were killed. But the country’s deadliest jihadist attacks predate IS. In 2002, over 200 people were killed in two bombings carried out by al-Qaeda-linked militants outside a bar and nightclub on the island of Bali, a popular tourist destination. In May 2005, bomb blasts killed 22 on the island of Sulawesi. Less than six months later, a suicide bombing in Bali killed 20. More on this story

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Re: Basilan’s perfect beach | Inquirer News

UNTAPPED DESTINATION Speedboats at Malamawi’s mini wharf bring visitors in and out of this paradise in Basilan’s capital city of Isabela. —JULIE ALIPALA
ZAMBOANGA CITY — No Boracay for six months?
Seekers of perfect beach spots need not look farther, says Jon Natividad, a local disc jockey. She has found a gem not far from this city.
“I lost my slippers on its white sand beach,” Natividad recounts her latest getaway to Malamawi in Basilan’s Isabela City. To her, it is the “real white beach.” ADVERTISEMENT
WORTH A SECOND LOOK The white beaches of Malamawi can easily rival those of Boracay. —JULIE ALIPALA
Top tourist spot
“The place is so cool,” she says. But the coolest part, she adds, is spending only less than P500 in going there, not the thousands of pesos in airfare to Boracay or other famed destinations.
“White Beach is our No. 1 tourist spot in Basilan,” says Roy Tan, who owns two hotels in Isabela. “[The] water is pristine, so clear and clean.”
Tan adds: “The entire island is still virgin. The coastline is a cove and you will enjoy the best sunrise and sunset there.”
It costs P160 for a round-trip boat ride from Zamboanga City to the port in Isabela. Travel time is one hour and 45 minutes.
At the small wharf, pump boats ferry passengers to Malamawi for P5 each. The ride is less than 10 minutes.
A “habal-habal” (motorcycle) ride costing P25 brings visitors to the pristine, unexploited waters and the long spread of fine white sand. ADVERTISEMENT
Cottages can be rented for P150 to P300. There is a hotel with eight family rooms, an event hall that can accommodate more than 200 people, and other amenities.
It even has a zip line for the more adventurous, and restaurant and transport services.
Peace and security
Tan says local and foreign tourists need to take a second look at Basilan, pointing out that celebrities and high-ranking government officials have already visited Malamawi.
The problem in Isabela, he says, is not really about peace and security, but the image of violent incidents that had happened in the city (population: 112,800 as of 2015). The stigma, he says, has affected not only tourism but the entire island’s economy as well.
“There are so many beautiful places to explore in Basilan, but a single negative report, even of an ordinary crime, tarnishes the whole [province],” he says.
Far from being a war zone, Isabela is as safe as other areas, Tan says.
Malamawi has no criminal past, says Senior Supt. Rufino Inot, Basilan provincial police director.
The place is safe, Inot says. The community, he points out, has not only established measures to protect visitors going to the beach, but also a system to guard their resources, including the setting up of a barangay intelligence network.
This eight-room family hotel (above and below) also features a convention hall with fast internet connection.
Since Malamawi was opened to the public, there have been “no reported cases of terrorism on site,” according to 1st Lt. Ron Villarosa, public affairs officer of Joint Task Force Basilan.
Villarosa, however, reminds visitors “to avoid becoming targets of opportunity by practicing utmost vigilance and by reporting suspicious activities to security forces.”
“At the end of the day, security will always be a shared responsibility,” he says.
Antipollution measures
With the closure of Boracay, Tan wants as many people to experience what Malamawi offers.
To prevent the area from getting polluted, measures have been adopted this early. For one, the use of plastics is forbidden.
“Everyone is required to bring their own trash bag. No one is allowed to return home with an empty trash bag,” Tan says. “The only obligation they have there is [to] pay [for their] entrance and [to] bring home their garbage.”
After having their fill on the island, visitors can stay in Isabela and experience its night life. The city has seven hotels so far.
The newest hotel, Basilan Business, was opened in March by an investor based in Zamboanga City.
“It’s a bit high-end, with restaurant and coffee shop. Connectivity is OK, food is cheap, it brings something new here,” says hotel guest Pamela Grace Biel Almanoche.
“For this summer, you don’t need to go far to enjoy and explore the best, it’s within our backyard. Security is assured, coupled with best seafood, fresh catch by our fisherfolk,” says John Teodoro, the hotel operator.
Don’t

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Arsenal News: What Arsenal can expect if they appoint Mikel Arteta | Metro News

Neymar drops huge hint over Real Madrid transfer
It is true, Arsenal have never been afraid of taking a risk with a managerial appointment in the past.
After all, Wenger was plucked from obscurity in Japan, Bolton had only just been promoted to the Premier League club when Bruce Rioch was appointed, while George Graham was managing Millwall when he took over from Don Howe. Even Bertie Mee, the manager of the 1970/71 double winning team, was promoted from the position of club physio.
Appointing Arteta, especially considering the man he could potentially be replacing, would represent the biggest risk of all given so little is known about his managerial style, beliefs and philosophy.
The 36-year-old gave Arsenal.com a detailed interview back in 2014, when he first revealed his intention to go into coaching, which does shed some light on what supporters could expect if the club presses ahead and makes its boldest decision in 22 years… How long has he been thinking about management? Mikel Arteta retired from playing at the end of the 2015/16 season (Picture: Getty)
‘My team-mates are always going ‘What are you going to do Miki? You’re going to be a manager, you should be a manager!’
‘I know what the job means and I know how hard it is, especially when I look at the boss and see how many hours he puts in here. You need to sacrifice your family all over again, which I’ve done since I was 15.
‘But I would love to manage a squad of players and staff – I’ve got it inside me, it’s true, and I want to do it. First of all I want to make the most of my playing career, because I’m 32 and in this game you never know whether you’ll end up carrying on until 34, 35 or 36.
‘After that, I’m certainly going to stay involved in football because I think I’ve got something to add. I would like to prove myself, and prove my ideas about managing and encouraging people to do things in the way I believe is best.’ What would his philosophy be? Arsenal’s stars would have to be 120% committed under Mikel Arteta’s regime (Picture: Getty)
‘My philosophy will be clear. I will have everyone 120% committed, that’s the first thing. If not, you don’t play for me. When it’s time to work it’s time to work, and when it’s time to have fun then I’m the first one to do it, but that commitment is vital.
Then I want the football to be expressive, entertaining. I cannot have a concept of football where everything is based on the opposition.
‘We have to dictate the game, we have to be the ones taking the initiative, and we have to entertain the people coming to watch us. I’m 100% convinced of those things, and I think I could do it.’ What system would he play? Arsene Wenger’s tactical inflexibility has been a bone of contention with Arsenal fans (Picture: Getty)
‘I think you need to adapt. You can have an idea of a system, but you need to be able to transform it depending on the players you have – how much pace you have up front, how technical your team is, what types of risk you can take and whether your players are ready to take those risks.
‘It’s important to analyse your players because you can’t always play the same way. There have to be different details and changes in how you approach things, and you have to look at how you can hurt whoever you are playing against. Is there something they don’t like to do?
‘If so, we’re going to make them do plenty of it. Then the most important thing for the manager is that, the Friday before the game, you imagine what’s going to happen on the Saturday. And if what happens on Saturday is not what I had planned, then it’s not been good enough from me.’ Who are his biggest managerial influences? Mikel Arteta has been learning his trade under Pep Guardiola at Manchester City (Picture: Getty)
‘One is Arsène Wenger, of course – he has a philosophy that he’s never going to change because he really believes in it.
‘That is the most important thing, because if you don’t really believe in something then you’ll just change it after one bad result and drive your players crazy. Another is Pep Guardiola, who I’ve known since I was 15.
‘The way he sees football is always to look ahead, then further ahead, always improving. Then there’s Mauricio Pochettino – he was my captain at PSG and I always knew he would become a manager. Mikel Arteta claimed he always knew his former PSG teammate Mauricio Pochettino would become a top manager (Picture: Reuters)
‘He has taken a lot of influence from Marcelo Bielsa, who was his coach with Argentina; they used to talk about things a lot, and now you can see that his teams are really aggressive, both when attacking and defending.
‘He takes a lot of risks, the players enjoy playing for him, his decisions are always sound and he’s got a good personality. I’ve admired Pochettino ever since I was young; he really looked after me when I was at PSG as well.’ Would he be a good fit? Mikel Arteta could end up managing a host of his former teammates (Picture: Getty)
Given everything Arteta said four years ago, you can see why the Gazidis would be impressed, why Guardiola is so desperate to keep one of his trusted assistants and why Wenger earmarked him for a career in management.
Discipline has been a key issue at Arsenal in recent years. Alex Iwobi was allowed to get away virtually scot-free after he was caught partying 24 hours before Arsenal’s FA Cup defence was ended by Nottingham Forest in January, while many, particularly Martin Keown, believe Mesut Ozil has been indulged once too often by his soon to be former manager.
Quite how comfortable Arteta would be barking instructions at those players he once shared a dressing room with remains to be seen and how those orders are received could make or break him, regardless of his coaching methods. Pep Guardiola on Mikel Arteta
‘I’m not the right guy to talk about that because my opinion of Mikel is overwhelming.
‘He deserves the best. We are so comfortable working with him, he is one of the reasons for our success this season.
‘There are many names for the next Arsenal manager. I don’t know what their plans are but I know Mikel very well and he deserves all he wants.’
Wenger’s tactical inflexibility and lack of in-game management has become a major source of frustration with the majority of his detractors. Only as a last resort did he turn to a five-man defence at the end of last season, a change which prompted a run of nine wins in 10 games, culminating in a Wembley win over Chelsea.
It is refreshing and encouraging, therefore, to hear Arteta talk of a horses for courses approach. He has learned his trade under one of the most experimental managers of the last 25 years and by citing Pochettino, a manager who prides his team on being as fit as humanly possible, as a major influence, coasting through games is unlikely to be an option if he were to get the job.

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Man Utd news: Mohamed Salah reveals Jose Mourinho message after joining Liverpool | Metro News

Mohamed Salah reveals first thing Jose Mourinho said to him after joining Liverpool Sean Kearns Monday 14 May 2018 7:40 am Share this article with Facebook Share this article through Mohamed Salah has revealed a message from Jose Mourinho (Picture: Getty)
Liverpool star Mohamed Salah says he has spoken to Jose Mourinho twice since moving to Anfield and has revealed the Manchester United boss said he was ‘happy’ that the Egyptian was thriving on Merseyside.
The winger played under Mourinho at Chelsea but made just 19 appearances before being sent on loan spells to Fiorentina and Roma.
Salah eventually joined Roma but Liverpool signed him for £34million last summer and the Egyptian was crowned PFA Player of the Year for scoring 44 goals in 51 appearances for the Reds this term.
Mourinho has attempted to absolve himself from the blame of letting Salah leave Chelsea but the Liverpool star claims the Special One is happy that he’s been a success at Liverpool. Salah played just 19 times for Chelsea (Picture: Getty)
‘I did meet him twice – in our match here at Anfield [Liverpool vs Manchester United] and in the other match in Manchester,’ Salah told Egypt Today. Advertisement Advertisement
‘He told me that he is happy with what I am doing. So, I thanked him. We didn’t talk much; I just said ‘hi’ to him and he told me that he was happy for me.’

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