5-year-old Oregon girl was paralyzed by a tick bite.

5-year-old Oregon girl was paralyzed by a tick bite.

June 12, 2018 — A Mississippi mother is warning parents to be on alert after her 5-year-old daughter, Kailyn, was temporarily paralyzed from a tick bite. After waking her daughter to get ready for daycare , Jessica Griffin noticed that Kailyn struggled to stand on her own and was slurring her speech, according to news reports. As Griffin began to brush Kailyn’s hair , she noticed something alarming.
A tick had embedded itself on her daughter’s scalp.
Griffin called her husband, who told her to immediately remove the tick, put it in a plastic bag, and rush Kailyn to the hospital.
Kailyn had a CT scan and bloodwork at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, where doctors diagnosed her with tick paralysis , The Washington Post reported.
According to the CDC, a nerve toxin found in a pregnant female tick’s saliva is believed to cause tick paralysis. Symptoms usually begin to show about 4 to 7 days after the tick starts feeding. Paralysis sets in slowly, starting in the legs and spreading into upper body, stopping your breathing if left unchecked.
Once the tick is removed, rapid recovery is common. Most diagnosed patients recover within 24 hours, and there are typically no long-term problems afterward.
Kailyn has since recovered and was discharged from University of Mississippi Medical Center on June 6, Jessica Griffin wrote on Facebook. It was unclear what type of tick bit her daughter.
A recent CDC report showed that vector-borne diseases — those transmitted by ticks , mosquitoes , and fleas — tripled to roughly 650,000 cases between 2004 and 2016. The vast majority — or 75% — were caused by ticks . The report says seven new tick-caused illnesses were discovered between 2004 and 2016.

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Nitin Gadkari threatens legal action after activist Shehla Rashid suggests he plotted to kill Modi

Nitin Gadkari threatens legal action after activist Shehla Rashid suggests he plotted to kill Modi The student activist later said her tweet was ‘sarcastic’. by Published Yesterday · 03:10 pm Shehla Rashid/Twitter
Student activist Shehla Rashid on Saturday suggested that Union minister Nitin Gadkari and the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh were behind an alleged plot to assassinate Prime Minister Narendra Modi. When Gadkari said he would take legal action, Rashid called her tweet “sarcastic”.
The Pune Police on Thursday had claimed to have found a letter at the home of one of the five activists it arrested a day before, suggesting a plot to kill Modi in his roadshows in a “Rajiv Gandhi-type incident”. The police had accused the activists of links with the banned Communist Party of India (Maoist).
Some Opposition parties expressed doubt about the credibility of the alleged letter. Rashid tweeted: “Looks like RSS/Gadkari is planning to assassinate Modi, and then blame it upon Muslims/Communists and then lynch Muslims.”
Without naming Rashid, Gadkari wrote on Twitter that he would take legal action against “anti-social elements who have made bizarre comments” about him. Looks like RSS/Gadkari is planning to assassinate Modi, and then blame it upon Muslims/Communists and then lynch Muslims #RajivGandhiStyle — Shehla Rashid (@Shehla_Rashid) June 9, 2018 I would be taking legal action on anti-social elements who have made bizzare comments; attributing personal motives to me, regarding the assassination threat to PM @narendramodi — Nitin Gadkari (@nitin_gadkari) June 9, 2018
Rashid then said that the the Union minister was getting worked up about a sarcastic tweet. She went on to ask Gadkari whether he would take similar action against a news channel for its allegations against student leader Umar Khalid.
“Leader of world’s biggest party gets worked up about a sarcastic tweet,” Rashid said on Twitter. “Imagine what an innocent student Umar Khalid must be going through after a baseless media assault on him and his father by Times Now. Mr Gadkari, will you also take action against Rahul Shivshankar?” Leader of world’s biggest party gets worked up about a sarcastic tweet. Imagine what an innocent student @UmarKhalidJNU must be going through after a baseless media assault on him & his father by Times Now.Mr. Gadkari, will you also take action against Rahul Shivshankar? https://t.co/tNDZLrqOKV — Shehla Rashid (@Shehla_Rashid) June 9, 2018
Meanwhile, the Congress on Saturday demanded an investigation into the alleged plot to assassinate Modi, and said the issue should not be politicised, PTI reported.
“Any threat received by anyone against the prime minister, howsoever suspicious the threat is, howsoever vague, even if it is a rumour, it should be taken seriously,” spokesperson Pawan Khera said. “Action should be taken, investigation should be done.”
Khera said the “threat to the prime minister of India” should not be used for “petty politics”. Support our journalism by subscribing to Scroll+ here . We welcome your comments at .

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Analysis: When Trump met Kim, the handshake was more historic than the words

North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un shakes hands with President Trump after taking part in a signing ceremony at the end of their historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore on June 12, 2018. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hailed their historic summit on June 12 as a breakthrough in relations between Cold War foes, but the agreement they produced was short on details about the key issue of Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons. ANTHONY WALLACE, AFP/Getty Images A South Korean newspaper deliveryman collects newspapers in Seoul reporting the summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on June 12, 2018. JUNG YEON-JE, AFP/Getty Images President Trump gestures as he speaks to reporters his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa Island, Singapore, June 12, 2018. HOW HWEE YOUNG, EPA-EFE White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens to President Trump speak during a press conference following the historic US-North Korea summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images President Trump waves from Air Force One after the historic US-North Korea summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images President Trump holds up a document signed by him and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un following a signing ceremony. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un looks at his document at a signing ceremony with President Trump. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un (L) and President Trump leave following a signing ceremony. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during the expanded bilateral meeting as part of the summit at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa Island, Singapore. KEVIN LIM , THE STRAITS TIMES via EPA-EFE North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un walks with President Trump at the start of the summit. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images Pedestrians in Tokyo look at a screen displaying live news of the meeting between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Trump. MARTIN BUREAU, AFP/Getty Images North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un shakes hands with President Trump at the start of their historic US-North Korea summit in Singapore. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images South Koreans at the Seoul Railway Station watch live coverage of President Trump’s meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. CHUNG SUNG-JUN, Getty Images President Trump shakes hands with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore. EVAN VUCCI, AP President Trump meets with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images People watch a television screen showing live footage of the summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore, at a railway station in Seoul. JUNG YEON-JE, AFP/Getty Images President Trump’s motorcade enters Sentosa Island where the summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will take place at the Capella Hotel in Sentosa, Singapore. Wong Maye-E, AP North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s motorcade leaves the St. Regis Hotel en route to the summit. YONHAP, EPA-EFE Singapore police stand guard in front of members of the media outside the Capella Hotel, just before the expected arrival of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Trump for a historic summit, at Sentosa, Singapore MAST IRHAM, EPA-EFE Singapore police patrol outside the Capella Hotel in Sentosa, Singapore. MAST IRHAM, EPA-EFE North Korea leader Kim Jong Un, center, is escorted by his security delegation as he visits Marina Bay in Singapore, June 11, 2018, ahead of Kim’s summit with President Donald Trump. Yong Teck Lim, AP President Donald Trump listens Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong ahead of a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, June 11, 2018, in Singapore. Evan Vucci, AP Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is seen in a television monitor as speaks to the media about the upcoming meeting between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in the J.W. Marriott in Singapore, June 11, 2018. JIM LO SCALZO, EPA-EFE A car carrying North Korean leader Kim Jong Un makes its way through downtown Singapore on June 11, 2018. Wong Maye-E, AP Throngs of onlookers watch President Donald Trump’s motorcade leave the Istana presidential residence in Singapore on June 11, 2018 in Singapore. Ore Huiying, Getty Images A man watches a TV screen showing file footage of President Donald Trump, right, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, June 11, 2018. Ahn Young-joon, AP Singapore Foreign Minister Vivian Balakrishnan takes a selfie with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on the Jubilee bridge at the Esplanade in Singapore, June 11, 2018. LYNN BO BO, EPA-EFE Singapore security personnel stand guard near the the St. Regis hotel, where North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is staying in Singapore, June 11, 2018. LYNN BO BO, EPA-EFE President Donald Trump shakes hands as he meets with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong ahead of a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, June 11, 2018, in Singapore. Evan Vucci, AP Singapore police block off the Jubilee bridge ahead of a visit from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on June 11, 2018 in Singapore. Chris McGrath, Getty Images Fullscreen The motorcade carrying North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, drives past on the street in Singapore on June 10, 2018. The North Korean leader met with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong ahead of a historic summit with President Donald Trump on June 12. LYNN BO BO, EPA-EFE Erica Boland, right, a U.S. student based in Singapore and a supporter of President Trump, and her friend wave a flag as they wait for his arrival, outside the Shangrila hotel in Singapore on June 10, 2018. TED ALJIBE, AFP/Getty Images A handout photo taken by Ministry of Communications and Information of Singapore on June 10, 2018 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arriving at Singapore International airport in Singapore. TERENCE TAN, AFP/Getty Images President Donald Trump waves upon his arrival to his hotel in Singapore on June 10, 2018, ahead of a planned meeting with North Korea’s leader. ANTHONY WALLACE, AFP/Getty Images North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, and Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong talk during their meeting at the Istana Presidential Palace in Singapore on June 10, 2018. WALLACE WOON, EPA-EFE People look at President Donald Trump’s arrival at the airport on TV screens in the International Media Center for the DPRK-US Singapore Summit in Singapore on June 10, 2018. HOW HWEE YOUNG, EPA-EFE Singapore military personnel patrol in front of the gate of the Istana Presidential Palace, where North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un and Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong will meet in Singapore on June 10, 2018. MAST IRHAM, EPA-EFE Members of the public and media wait outside the entrance to the Shangri-La Hotel for the arrival of President Donald Trump on June 10, 2018 in Singapore. Chris McGrath, Getty Images

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Ivanka Trump Made $3.9 Million From Father’s Hotel in 2017 – Bloomberg

Ivanka Trump made $3.9 million from her investment in her father’s hotel in Washington last year, according to a disclosure released by the White House on Tuesday.
She was also paid $2 million in severance by her family’s real estate company, the Trump Organization . Together, Ivanka Trump and her husband Jared Kushner earned at least $82 million in outside income while working as unpaid senior advisers to her father, President Donald Trump.
Kushner reported at least $27 million and as much as $135 million in outstanding liabilities. Federal rules require top officials to report income, assets and liabilities in broad ranges. He reported more than $5 million in capital gains from the sale of a shopping mall in the Bronx.
The financial disclosure forms showed that trusts benefiting Kushner, Trump or their children made eight purchases of at least $9.8 million in real estate, including properties in New Jersey and New York City. The transactions occurred between March and September 2017.
Kushner reported divesting more than 125 assets, and listed several others as being in process of divestment. He also said in his filing that he would continue to recuse himself from matters involving broker-dealer, real estate and online financial services related to his holdings in Quadro Partners, which owns Cadre.com, an online platform for investing in real estate.
Private and Public The Trumps and Kushner retained their ownership in their private businesses upon entering the White House, a decision that critics say has left them open to conflicts of interest and influence by foreign countries.
The White House released financial disclosure forms for other officials, including National Security Adviser John Bolton, who reported $2.2 million in income in the year and three months before he joined the administration.
The biggest chunk of that was the $569,423 he made as a commentator on Fox News. The American Enterprise Institute, a think tank, paid Bolton $240,000 in salary, and Deutsche Bank paid him $72,000 for a speech. That did not include the amount paid to the agent who had arranged for Bolton’s appearance.
Bolton also made $115,000 for a pair of appearances at the Yalta European Strategy, or YES, conference, sponsored by the Victor Pinchuk Foundation, in September 2017 and February 2018. Pinchuk is a Ukrainian oligarch and Special Counsel Robert Mueller is examining a $150,000 payment that his foundation made to Donald Trump’s foundation for Trump to appear via video at a conference in September 2015, according to a report in the New York Times.
Bolton was of counsel in the Washington office of the law firm Kirkland & Ellis LLP , but he did not list any income from the firm.
Bolton also reported at least $11.2 million in assets, most of which were held in what ethics rules call exempted investment funds that don’t have to be divested because they invest in a wide variety of securities.
— With assistance by Justin Sink, and Margaret Talev
( Updates with additional details starting in the fourth paragraph. ) LISTEN TO ARTICLE 3:01

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Congress forgetting its history of manipulating judiciary: Arun Jaitley | India News

NEW DELHI: Union minister Arun Jaitley on Sunday cited several instances of judicial appointments during Congress-ruled governments where attempts were made to influence the Supreme Court to argue that the opposition protests over recent controversies were misplaced.
Writing in the context of the Centre’s decision to return the Supreme Court collegium’s recommendation to elevate Uttarakhand high court chief justice K M Joseph to the apex court, Jaitley said it was not out of line with procedure. Congress, he said, had forgotten how it had sought to prevent the SC from making fundamental rights above any dilution through Parliament majorities it enjoyed.
Jaitley referred to an instance during Indira Gandhi’s tenure as PM and said, “An important turn in the judicial appointments history was the decision of the Prime Minister to appoint ideologically committed law ministers so that judicial appointments could be influenced by the social and political philosophy of the judge,” he said.
Citing the famous Kesavananda Bharati case, Jaitley recalled how the government of the day tried to subvert the independence of judiciary and gain power to tweak even the basic tenets of the Constitution with the help of the Parliament.
It was a landmark decision of the Supreme Court that outlined the “basic structure doctrine” of the Constitution, which cannot be tampered with.
Referring to T R Andhyarjuna’s book — The Kesavananda Bharati Case: the Untold Story of Struggle for Supremacy by Supreme Court and Parliament— he recounted how the government tried various “tricks to delay the hearing” so that the then Chief Justice S M Sikri retires and government retains the right to amend the Constitution even with regard to fundamental rights.

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