'Super Smash Bros. Ultimate' lands December 7th 2018

‘Super Smash Bros. Ultimate’ lands December 7th 2018

‘Super Smash Bros. Ultimate’ lands December 7th 2018 It includes every fighter ever. Save Nintendo
Nintendo’s E3 showcase focused heavily on the return of one of its hit series: Super Smash Bros Ultimate has landed . The main takeaway is that all fighters that have ever appeared in the series are now back. That includes the return of outsiders like Solid Snake (ten years since he last appeared in Smash Bros .) and, well, over 60 characters total. Just think of the (completely compatible) Amiibo collection. Nintendo took a deep dive on the roster, outlining how each character has gradually evolved for Ultimate .
This includes mildly different character designs, new final smash attacks and more expressive facial expressions for everyone. In short, even seasoned Smash Bros. fighters will have to reassess both their favorite characters and the competition.
Some characters, like Cloud and R.O.B, will have gauges visible on screen to improve strategic play, while others, like Ike have multiple voice options. For some reason. More importantly, the game system itself has gone through several changes. This includes players being penalized for excessive dodging and a new ‘perfect shield’ technique.
There’s new characters too, including Inkling (more ink on your rival will increase damage) and Princess Daisy, who is an ‘echo’ version of Peach. While the moveset is largely the same, there will be slight differences that players will have to get used to. Expect even more character reveals before the game lands on December 7th.
( Update: Like Ridley from Metroid !)
Follow all the latest news from E3 2018 here! By Mat Smith @thatmatsmith
Mat once failed an audition to be the Milkybar Kid, an advert creation that pushed white chocolate on gluttonous British children. Two decades later, having repressed that early rejection, he moved to Japan, learned the language, earned his black belt in Judo and returned to UK, and soon joined Engadget’s European team. After a few years leading Engadget’s coverage from Japan, reporting on high-tech toilets and robot restaurants as Senior Editor, he now heads up our UK bureau in London. 1104 Shares

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Here’s your first look at dystopian RPG ‘Cyperpunk 2077’

Here’s your first look at dystopian RPG ‘Cyperpunk 2077’ The studio behind ‘Witcher 3’ shows off its next game. Save CD Projekt Red
Finally, we have our first proper look at Cyberpunk 2077 . We’ve known for some time that Witcher 3 developer CD Projekt Red is working on a new role-playing game set in a dystopian future. Beyond a brief teaser trailer, however, the studio has shown and said little about the title. That all changed today, however. A new trailer for Cyberpunk 2077 was shown at the end of Microsoft’s E3 press conference, revealing a high-tech world full of flying cars, holographic ads and robot wrestling. There was no gameplay, however — today’s footage, while in-engine, was purely cinematic.
Cyberpunk 2077 is based on a tabletop board game series called Cyberpunk , which was first released in 1988. It’s set in the fictional Night City, at a seedy metropolis sandwiched between Los Angeles and San Francisco. The US government has practically collapsed, allowing large corporations to seize territory and tremendous power over the city. Crime is rife, with smugglers, hackers and assassins dominating the streets. If you’ve dreamed of a Blade Runner game that isn’t a point-and-click adventure, this is the closest you’re probably going to get. I can’t wait to see more of the title and live out my dream of a double-crossing information broker.
Follow all the latest news from E3 2018 here! By Nick Summers @nisummers
Nick is a reporter for Engadget, covering video games, internet culture and anything else that takes his fancy. He has a bachelor’s in multimedia journalism and holds an NCTJ certificate. Before joining Oath, he was a staff writer at The Next Web and an investigative journalist at FE Week, an education-focused newspaper in the UK. He lives in Greenwich, London with a stack of half-finished Gundam model kits. 534 Shares

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Our team meeting before IPL final lasted 5 secs: Dhoni | Cricket News – Times of India

Our team meeting before IPL final lasted 5 secs: Dhoni Our team meeting before IPL final lasted 5 secs: Dhoni There’s a certain calm about the Chennai Super Kings dressing room that powers their team in the high-pressure world of the IPL, and could perhaps be responsible for their third IPL triumph last month. | TNN | Updated: Jun 12, 2018, 08:55 IST Highlights If Mahendra Singh Dhoni is to be believed, CSK’s team meeting before this year’s final against the Sunrisers Hyderabad, took all of five seconds! CSK won the final by eight wickets riding on a brilliant hundred by Shane Watson MUMBAI: There’s a certain calm about the Chennai Super Kings dressing room that powers their team in the high-pressure world of the IPL, and could perhaps be responsible for their third IPL triumph last month. In a tournament where every ball of the game is dissected minutely by captains, coaches and even team owners, CSK is a team where a player is told to ‘just enjoy himself’ even after a defeat. Before the final of even an inter-school tournament, you’d expect the coach to draw up a strategy, a captain to come up with an inspiring speech, something that would spice up a team meeting. However, if Mahendra Singh Dhoni is to be believed, CSK’s team meeting before this year’s final against the Sunrisers Hyderabad , which they won by eight wickets riding on a brilliant hundred by Shane Watson , took all of five seconds! “I think at that point of time, we were quite relaxed about how we’d conducted ourselves throughout the tournament. And everybody’s role and responsibilities were very clear. So, you need to address something if it really needs to be addressed. You know, there’s no point, just because if there’s a captain and a coach of the team, you’ve to say something. The team meeting that we had, lasted hardly five seconds. (Stephen) Fleming was like: ‘Go, get it boys.’ And it got over. And I always have felt that this was one of the secrets why CSK keep doing that (winning the IPL). We don’t have a long list of meetings. We don’t have too many meetings because we’ve played so long each with other, against each other, you know the conditions so well, you exactly know how you need to operate. And there’s no rocket science. Yes, we’ve the bowlers’ meetings, the batters’ meeting, and I don’t become a part of the batters’ meeting. A lot of times, people do it because they need to tick a box. And in CSK, there’s no justification that happens … you know that the bowling coach doesn’t need to justify to the owners,” Dhoni said here on Monday night at the ‘Star Reimagine awards.’ In a lighter tone, the CSK skipper revealed that the only time his team held a meeting was before the match against Kings XI Punjab at the league stage at Mohali, and on that occasion, Chris Gayle blew them off the park with a blazing hundred. “We had a bowler’s meeting you know, before Gayle hit that century (against CSK). A lot of times, it happens that you do it for the sake of doing it. You know you say before the finals, ‘oh we did thus, we did that.’ That’s not in our case. We try to keep it as simple as possible. What’s important as a coaching staff, or as a captain, you need to give advices to a player according to what they can achieve. All of a sudden, you can’t tell somebody, ‘Ok, you need to bowl outside off stump yorkers,’ and that guy has never done that. So you’ve to tell that guy according to what his strength is and he’s to improve his weak areas. That’s what is brilliant about us,” he explained. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App . Download The Times of India news app for your device. Read more Sports news in English and other languages. RELATED

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Why Donald Trump’s tariffs are upsetting everyone

Why Donald Trump’s tariffs are upsetting everyone Protectionist trade policies harm workers, hurt consumers, and make America less secure: Our view Post to Facebook Why Donald Trump’s tariffs are upsetting everyone Protectionist trade policies harm workers, hurt consumers, and make America less secure: Our view //usat.ly/2sTj6MM 43 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Why Donald Trump’s tariffs are upsetting everyone The Editorial Board , USA TODAY Published 6:16 p.m. ET June 10, 2018 | Updated 6:31 a.m. ET June 11, 2018 CLOSE President Donald Trump delivered a stern warning on trade to foreign countries at the Group of Seven summit on Saturday, urging trading partners not to retaliate against U.S. tariffs on the imports of steel and aluminum. (June 9) AP Protectionist trade policies harm workers, hurt consumers, and make America less secure: Our view At the G-7 summit in Quebec, Canada, on June 9, 2018. T (Photo: Jesco Denzel via AFP/Getty Images) CONNECT 43 COMMENT EMAIL MORE President Trump left this weekend’s Group of Seven economic powers summit in Quebec in a petulant snit, tweeting en route to Singapore like a scorned adolescent while doing his best to harm relations with nations that have been America’s trusted friends for decades, if not centuries. This destructive feud with Canada and other friends came in part because they are pushing back against his ill-considered protectionist trade policies, particularly his recently announced tariffs on steel and aluminum. The tariffs aren’t any more popular at home than they are abroad. Several Senate Republicans are pushing a measure that would roll them back. And Charles and David Koch, the billionaire brothers who support numerous GOP causes and candidates, are pouring money into anti-tariff advertising and lobbying campaigns . UNITED STEELWORKERS: Metals tariffs are crucial to national security None of this should come as a surprise, as the tariffs are colossally stupid and counterproductive. Among other things, they will: ►Harm workers. Tariffs on steel and aluminum might help those specific industries. But they harm the much larger industries — such as automobiles and aerospace — that use steel and aluminum in their fabrication processes. These industries will now be less competitive than their overseas rivals because their input costs are higher. The tariffs, first announced in March but with wide exemptions that have been rescinded, add 25% to the cost of steel and 10% to the cost of aluminum. They are likely to have an outsize impact on the auto parts industry, with car makers ordering more of their parts from abroad to avoid the steel tariffs. On Wednesday, three Arkansas companies said they would close if not exempted from the tariffs . ►Hurt consumers. Make no mistake about it, tariffs are taxes. They require people to pay more for everything from cars to kitchen appliances. Auto industry analysts estimate the tariffs will add $300 to the price of a car , for instance. A proposed 25% tax on imported vehicles would add even more misery, as many of the big imports are hugely popular cars and trucks such as the Chevrolet Silverado and the Dodge Ram . ►Make America less secure. To justify these tariffs, Trump has cited national security concerns. But how does picking a fight with America’s most important geopolitical allies make any sense from a security point of view? It does just the opposite, in fact. Adversaries, particularly the Russians, are now wooing Europeans in a bid to exploit the divisions emerging between Washington and its closest friends. The tariffs are already inviting allies’ retaliation against American-made products such as bourbon and motorcycles. Perhaps Trump’s strong-arm tactics will ultimately result in the easing of some trade barriers against U.S.-made products. But history shows that trade wars, like shooting wars, are easier to get into than get out of. Trump complains about Germany’s manufacturing export economy without coming to grips with what is behind it. It is not tariffs but a society-wide commitment to manufacturing that makes its economy work. Its educational system and major corporations work hand-in-hand to train and retrain workers. Its banks pour capital into manufacturing in much the same way that American venture capital firms pour money into tech. There is a reason so many people — key allies, Republicans, Democrats, American companies — are upset with Trump’s tariffs. They are as misguided now as they were during the Great Depression. USA TODAY’s editorial opinions are decided by its Editorial Board , separate from the news staff. Most editorials are coupled with an opposing view — a unique USA TODAY feature. To read more editorials, go to the Opinion front page or sign up for the daily Opinion email newsletter . To respond to this editorial, submit a comment to . If you can’t see this reader poll, please refresh your page.

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What an End to the 68-Year Korean War Would Mean: QuickTake

BloombergQuickTake Analysis Analysis Interpretation of the news based on evidence, including data, as well as anticipating how events might unfold based on past events What an End to the 68-Year Korean War Would Mean: QuickTake by David Tweed | Bloomberg June 11 As disputes go, this one really has dragged on. Some 65 years since open hostilities ended, North Korea and the U.S. are still technically at war. However, after a sudden warming of relations this year, leaders Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump are meeting in Singapore where the subject of a formal peace treaty is bound to come up during negotiations aimed at getting North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons. 1. Why is the Korean War still not over? Because the parties involved in talks to end the war — North and South Korea, China and the United Nations (representing the international community, including the U.S.) — never were able to agree on a peace treaty. What was signed in 1953 was only an armistice, or truce, and only among three of the four parties, as South Korea held out. That’s why the border between the two nations has been one of the world’s tensest for decades. 2. How does this fit into North Korea’s strategy? North Korea wants a security guarantee to ensure the survival of Kim’s regime. A peace treaty would be part of that. Once a treaty were signed, the way would be open to North Korea getting full diplomatic recognition from the U.S. 3. What would be the ramifications of signing too early? Once a treaty were signed, questions would be raised about the rationale for keeping U.S. troops in South Korea. If there were to be a troop withdrawal — something Trump had talked about during his election campaign — before North Korea denuclearized, then Japan and South Korea may feel the need to get their own nuclear weapons, setting off a regional arms race that could draw in China, India, Pakistan and Russia. 4. How are relations between North Korea and South Korea? When Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in met in April, they announced plans to formally declare a resolution to the war and turn the current armistice into a peace treaty by year’s end, as well as aiming for full denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. 5. Have North Korea and South Korea ever come close to peace? It’s seemed that way. At a 2007 summit in Pyongyang, President Roh Moo-hyun and Kim Jong Il (Kim Jong Un’s father) settled on dozens of agreements aimed at supporting North Korea’s economy and recommitted to a declaration made at a summit in 2000 — the first between leaders of North Korea and South Korea — that the two sides would seek peaceful reunification. 6. What came of that peace effort? Negotiations — known as the “six-party talks” — broke down in 2008 after North Korea refused to allow international inspectors to visit nuclear facilities. Around the same time, South Korea elected a conservative president, Lee Myung-bak, who favored a harder line and abandoned his predecessor’s so-called “Sunshine Policy” toward North Korea. The sinking of a South Korean corvette, killing 46 sailors, by a suspected North Korean torpedo prompted the newly elected president to cut off all ties. • The two Koreas are worlds apart after seven decades of separation. • QuickTakes on the upcoming Trump-Kim meeting and North Korea’s nuclear weapons program. • Will Kim give up his nukes? History says no. • A North Korea deal must go beyond economics, writes Bloomberg View’s Michael Schuman. • A Bloomberg infographic considers the range of North Korea’s missile threat. • North Korea’s 10 deadliest provocations since the Korean War. –With assistance from Peter Pae. To contact the reporter on this story: David Tweed in Hong Kong at dtweed@bloomberg.net To contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Grant Clark, Laurence Arnold ©2018 Bloomberg L.P. The story must be told. Your subscription supports journalism that matters.

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