Complete denuclearisation in return for security guarantees from Trump: Kim

Complete denuclearisation in return for security guarantees from Trump: Kim

June 12, 2018 16:33 IST Updated: June 12, 2018 23:25 IST more-in North pledges to move towards denuclearisation; U.S. assures its old foe of security guarantees
U.S. President Donald Trump said North Korean leader Kim Jong-un pledged at a historic summit on Tuesday to move towards complete denuclearisation, while the U.S. promised its old foe security guarantees.
The start of negotiations, aimed at banishing what Mr. Trump described as North Korea’s “very substantial” nuclear arsenal, could have far-reaching ramifications for the region, and in one of the biggest surprises of the day, Mr. Trump said he would stop military exercises with old ally South Korea. No specifics
But Mr. Trump and Mr. Kim gave few other specifics in a joint statement signed at the end of their summit in Singapore, and several analysts cast doubt on how effective the agreement would prove to be in the long run at getting North Korea to give up its cherished nuclear weapons.
“President Trump committed to provide security guarantees to the DPRK and Chairman Kim Jong-un reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearisation of the Korean Peninsula,” the statement said, referring to North Korea by the initials of its official name, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
The two leaders had appeared cautious and serious when they arrived for the summit at the Capella Hotel on Singapore’s Sentosa, a resort island with luxury hotels, a casino and a Universal Studios theme park.
After a handshake, they were soon smiling and holding each other by the arm, before Mr. Trump guided Mr. Kim to a library, where they met with only their interpreters. Mr. Trump had said on Saturday that he would know within a minute of meeting Mr. Kim whether he would reach a deal.
Mr. Trump later told a news conference that he expected the denuclearisation process to start “very, very quickly”, and it would be verified by “having a lot of people in North Korea.”
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and North Korean officials would hold follow-up negotiations “at the earliest possible date,” the statement said.
Despite Mr. Kim announcing that North Korea was destroying a major missile engine-testing site, Mr. Trump said sanctions on North Korea would stay in place for now. Earlier, Mr. Kim said he and Mr. Trump had “decided to leave the past behind. The world will see a major change.” ‘The past doesn’t have to be the future’
When U.S. President Donald Trump sat down to make the case for peace to North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un on Tuesday, he rolled out a four-minute video starring the two leaders.
The video plays over a pulsing orchestral score, and appears to be composed almost entirely of generic stock footage and old news clips, including images of two smiling.
At one point, it features a montage with babies and car factories, suggesting what a more prosperous future for North Korea could look like if it agreed to give up its nuclear arsenal. “The past doesn’t have to be the future,” says a narrator.
Then later, the narrator says, “a new world can begin today,” as an animated sequence suggests what North Korea could look like from space if it was as brightly lit up at night as the far more prosperous South Korea.
At times, the video appeared to address Mr. Kim directly, suggesting he could make a choice that would open North Korea to new investment.

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US arrests 74 in global email scam crackdown – BBC News

US arrests 74 in global email scam crackdown 11 June 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Getty Images The US has arrested 74 people including nearly 30 in Nigeria, as part of an effort to combat email scam artists.
It said the arrests reflect a coordinated crackdown on people who convince correspondents to wire them money for fraudulent activities.
The US said such scams are “prevalent” and pledged to pursue perpetrators “regardless of where they are located”.
Authorities said they have seized, recovered or disrupted more than $16m (£12m) since January.
The effort, which involved local and federal law enforcement agencies, targeted scammers who trick people into transferring them money, for example by impersonating a business partner or colleague.
In one case, the US alleged that two Nigerians living in Dallas posed as a property seller when requesting a $246,000 wire transfer from a real estate attorney.
Authorities also went after “money mules” – “witting or unwitting accomplices” who receive the money from the victims and transfer it as directed by the fraudsters. ‘Disrupt and dismantle’
The US said arrests occurred in the US, Nigeria, Canada, Mauritius and Poland.
One man was extradited from the UK in 2016 for his role in a scheme that allegedly sought to take $2.6m. He pleaded guilty in January to wire fraud and identity theft.
FBI Director Christopher Wray, whose agency funded and coordinated the operation, said: “This operation demonstrates the FBI’s commitment to disrupt and dismantle criminal enterprises that target American citizens and their businesses.”
The FBI said people have reported losing more than $3.7bn since it started tracking the issue through its Internet Crime Complaint Center.
“The devastating effects these cases have on victims and victim companies, affect not only the individual business but also the global economy,” the US said. Related Topics

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New measures to protect doctors after Bawa-Garba case – BBC News

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright PA Image caption Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba (R) was struck off following an appeal by the doctors’ regulator New measures designed to improve patient safety and protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made, are to be announced by the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt.
It comes after concerns were raised following the case of Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba, who was struck off after the death of a six-year-old boy.
Mr Hunt said staff should be able to learn from their mistakes.
Hundreds of medics also signed an open letter in support of Dr Bawa-Garba.
She was found guilty of mistakes in the care of six-year-old Jack Adcock, from Leicestershire, who died of sepsis in 2011.
Following a government review ordered by Mr Hunt, new measures are being introduced.
These include: the investigation of every hospital death by a medical examiner or coroner data on doctors’ performance will allow them to see how they compare to others to help them improve the regulator – the General Medical Council – will no longer be able to appeal against the findings of doctors’ disciplinary hearings
Professor Norman Williams who conducted the review said that “a clearer understanding” of when manslaughter charges should be brought in healthcare “should lead to fewer criminal investigations”.
Professor Williams said criminal investigation should be confined “to just those rare cases where an individual’s performance is so ‘truly exceptionally bad’ that it requires a criminal sanction”. Learn from mistakes
Dr Bawa-Garba was originally suspended from the medical register for 12 months by a tribunal, but was then removed from the medical register following a High Court appeal by regulator the General Medical Council.
The GMC said the the original decision was “not sufficient to protect the public”.
But the health secretary says improving patient safety means doctors and other staff must be able to reflect openly and freely when they have made ordinary mistakes, instead of being punished for them.
“When something goes tragically wrong in healthcare, the best apology to grieving families is to guarantee that no-one will experience that same heartache again,” Mr Hunt said.
“I was deeply concerned about the unintended chilling effect on clinicians’ ability to learn from mistakes following recent court rulings… the actions from this authoritative review will help us promise them that the NHS will support them to learn, rather than seek to blame.”
Doctors say medicine is about balancing risk – and that mistakes will happen.
The British Medical Association, representing doctors, said that it would be monitoring closely how the law was applied in the light of the review’s recommendations.
BMA council chair Dr Chaand Nagpaul said: “If we, as doctors, and the wider health service are to learn from these mistakes and to prevent such tragedies occurring, the NHS needs a dramatic shift away from the current culture of blame.”
The Department of Health and Social Care said the changes would mean bereaved families would get more information about the circumstances of their loved ones’ death and more data would be shared across the NHS to help prevent avoidable deaths in the future. Related Topics

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Americans’ Obsession With Sugar Starts in Infancy – WebMD

By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
SUNDAY, June 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s well-known that Americans consume too much sugar . But that affinity for the sweet stuff starts as early as infancy, with some babies consuming added sugar that exceeds maximum levels recommended for adults, U.S. researchers report.
Eating foods with added sugar can influence a child’s food choices later in life. And added sugar has been linked with obesity , asthma, dental cavities and heart disease risk factors such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure , the study authors said.
The researchers analyzed data from 800 infants and toddlers between 6 and 23 months old in the 2011-2014 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
They found that 85 percent of the infants and toddlers consumed added sugar on a given day and that added sugar consumption rose with age.
Just over 60 percent of those ages 6 to 11 months averaged just under 1 teaspoon of added sugar a day. That rose to 98 percent among those babies 12 to 18 months, who averaged 5.5 teaspoons of added sugar a day.
And a whopping 99 percent of babies 19 to 23 months old averaged just over 7 teaspoons of added sugar on a given day, more than the amount in a Snickers candy bar, the study authors said.
The added sugar included cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup and honey.
Daily recommended limits for added sugar are 6 teaspoons or less a day for children 2 to 19 years old and for adult women, and 9 teaspoons or less a day for adult men.
But most Americans exceed those limits.
The study findings are scheduled for presentation Sunday at the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting, in Boston.
“This is the first time we have looked at added sugar consumption among children less than 2 years old,” said lead study author Kirsten Herrick, a nutritional epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
“Our results show that added sugar consumption begins early in life and exceeds current recommendations. These data may be relevant to the upcoming 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” she said in a society news release.
“The easiest way to reduce added sugars in your own diet and your kids’ diet is to choose foods that you know don’t have them, like fresh fruits and vegetables,” Herrick suggested.
Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

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As U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim J

As U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jung Un concluded their historic summit with a commitment from Kim to abandon its nuclear program in exchange for security gaurantees, human rights abuses remained off the negotiating table.
North Korea’s extensive prison camp system where detainees are subjected to forced labor, torture, starvation, rape and death is set to continue.
Ahead of the summit, a UN expert called for the United States and other powers to put human rights firmly on the agenda of their talks with North Korea, saying it would help make any progress towards denuclearisation “sustainable.”
Tomas Ojea Quintana, UN special rapporteur on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), urged the country to start releasing prisoners under a gradual general amnesty.
skip – 4 Reporter: You at that point said that North Korea has more brutally oppressed its people than any regime on Earth. Do you still believe that’s the case?
Trump: I believe it’s a rough situation over there. It’s rough in a lot of places, by the way, not just there. pic.twitter.com/PmlFAbLTiE
— NBC News (@NBCNews) June 12, 2018 He was speaking at a news briefing in Geneva on Thursday, “What I am saying is that at some point, whether the next summit or other summits to come or meetings, it is very important that human rights are raised. Otherwise first it will be a problem in terms of building a sustainable agreement with DPRK with regard to denuclearisation,” he said.
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Close Not raising such issues would be a “wrong message” he said.
In November 2016 satellite images reportedly showed that North Korea ‘s prison camps continued to expand. The Washington-based Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) released images of Camp No. 25, a camp near Chongjin, on North Korea’s northeast coast.
“Our satellite imagery analysis of Camp No. 25 and other such unlawful detention facilities appears to confirm the sustained, if not increased importance of the use of forced labor under Kim Jong-un,” HRNK executive director Greg Scarlatoiu said in a statement
Trump, who has called for North Korea to abnadon its nuclear weapons, said on June 1 after meeting its envoy Kim Yong Chol that Pyongyang’s human rights record was not discussed at that meeting.
“I am not of the opinion that a human rights dialogue will undermine the opening and the talks on denuclearisation at all. I don’t think that there is a dilemma here,” Ojea Quintana said.
On the contrary, a willingness by North Korea to open up to human rights mechanisms will give them “credibility … in their intention to denuclearise” and “show that they want to become a normal state”, he said.
North Korea does not recognise Ojea Quintana’s mandate and his recommendations are not binding. He said he had met U.S., South Korean and Japanese diplomats in Geneva this week to discuss his proposals.
North Korea’s political prison camps should be “on the table” in future talks, Ojea Quintana said.
In a landmark 2014 report, U.N. investigators said that 80,000 to 120,000 were thought to be held in camps in the isolated country, where Ojea said there was “no rule of law” or due process.
“I can say that they exist, I have met with people who recently left DPRK and they told me about their fear to be sent to these places. They told me people they know who suddenly disappeared from their townships and were sent to these places.
“My call is for an amnesty, a general amnesty that includes these prisoners and it is a concrete call,” Ojea Quintana said.
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