Vietnam protesters clash with police over new economic zones – BBC News

Vietnam protesters clash with police over new economic zones – BBC News

Vietnam protesters clash with police over new economic zones 11 June 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Protests are a rare sight in Vietnam Demonstrators clashed with police in Vietnam in protests against plans for new economic zones that some fear will be dominated by Chinese investors.
Police reportedly detained more than a dozen people in the capital Hanoi and halted demonstrations in other cities.
Some carried anti-China banners, including one reading: “No leasing land to China even for one day.”
The government proposed a law last year that would give foreign investors a 99-year lease on Vietnamese land.
The bill offers them greater incentives and fewer restrictions, in an attempt to promote growth in target areas.
The protesters suspect that the communist government will award Chinese investors leases in the three economic zones in the north-east, south-east and south-west of the country, and that this would be a pretext for Chinese control over the island of Van Don near their shared border.
China once colonised Vietnam, the two countries fought a border war less than 40 years ago, and Vietnam contests Chinese control of a number of islands in the South China Sea.
As a result, says BBC South East Asia correspondent Jonathan Head, Vietnam’s leaders must always tread a delicate line between maintaining relations with their powerful neighbour, and avoiding provoking anti-Chinese sentiment in a fiercely nationalist population. Protesters bring China issue to the fore
By Giang Nguyen, editor of BBC Vietnamese
This is the biggest challenge for Vietnam’s Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc since his government was sworn in more than two years ago with a pledge to stamp out corruption and revitalise the economy.
The three special economic zones are meant to be “mini Singapores” – business-friendly environments complete with high-tech hubs.
But Mr Phuc appears to have underestimated deep-seated resentments against China, and the speed at which protesters can utilise social media to organise street marches in cities including Hanoi and Saigon. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Protesters like those who marched in Ho Chi Minh City have said they will demonstrate again
While some are fearful of a perceived Chinese influence in Vietnam under the economic zone proposals, others are concerned about plans for a new cyber security bill. The latter has angered Facebook users in particular, who fear the authorities will be given too much power, while online surveillance could become the norm.
Next week, two parliamentary sessions – on 12 and 15 June – are scheduled for voting on the two draft bills and protesters have said they will take to the streets again until – or unless – the government abandons them both.
Vietnam won a naval battle against a Mongolian fleet off Van Don island in 1288, and some Vietnamese people fear their government will give it away amid tensions between the two countries over disputed territory in the South China Sea. US: China is ‘intimidating neighbours’
Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc last week told local media the 99-year term would be reduced, although he did not specify the new length.
And on Saturday, the government announced a vote on the draft legislation would be delayed to allow further scrutiny.
Demonstrators are also objecting to a cyber security bill, scheduled for a vote on 12 June. Human Rights Watch says it would give the government broad powers to quash dissent online .
Roughly $5 trillion worth of global trade passes through the South China Sea annually, and a number of countries claim disputed islands in the area.
Vietnam has seen protests over the maritime disputes in recent years, including in 2014, when Chinese citizens fled the country in their thousands after violence targeting foreign-owned businesses. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Protesters in Hanoi took to the streets in 2012 for a rare demonstration Related Topics

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Bode Miller: US Olympic skier’s daughter drowns – BBC News

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright AFP Image caption Bode Miller with daughter Emmy in February last year. The skiing world has been expressing its sympathy The 19-month-old daughter of former US Olympic skier Bode Miller has died after falling into a swimming pool.
Emmy Miller was found unconscious at a neighbour’s home in Orange County, southern California, and doctors were unable to revive her.
In a statement posted on Instagram, Mr Miller said he and his family were “beyond devastated”.
Mr Miller is the most successful skier in US history, with six Olympic medals including gold at the 2010 Games.
The 40-year-old and his wife Morgan, a professional beach volleyball player, were at a party on Saturday night when the incident happened.
Their daughter somehow got away and was found in the pool by Mrs Miller, who jumped in and tried to resuscitate her, local authorities told ABC .
Paramedics took the baby girl to hospital but could not save her.
“Never in a million years did we think we would experience a pain like this. Her love, her light, her spirit will never be forgotten,” Mr Miller wrote.

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What Facebook told Congress: It even knows when you need to charge your phone

Apr 11, 2018; Washington, DC, USA; Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee regarding the company’s use and protection of user data in Washington. (Photo: Jack Gruber/USA TODAY) For instance, Facebook revealed that it collects data — a lot of data — about the various devices people use to log into Facebook, such as computers, their smartphones and their tablets. Facebook also collects information such as the device’s battery level, how much available storage they have and the strength of the Wi-Fi signal the machine is receiving. The company also knows whether you’re actually looking at your Facebook window or if you’ve just got it open as one of many tabs. In some cases, Facebook can also gather information about nearby devices or other devices on the user’s network. The Cambridge Analytica data revelations, on the heels of the company’s belated acknowledgement that a Russian disinformation operation had scammed its users with millions of fake posts designed to sway their voting, turned into a public relations crisis for the high-flying company. Celebrity users vowed to delete their Facebook, lawmakers threatened regulations and Zuckerberg agreed for the first time to testify before Congress. More: Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak says he’s left Facebook over data collection The hearings also gave a platform for lawmakers to air some longstanding complaints — such as allegations Facebook’s news feed is biased against conservatives. As one of his 114 questions, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, posed a series of detailed queries about what types of speech Facebook might define as hate speech and therefore censor, including statements such as “Islam is a religion of peace” and “Islam is a religion of war,” as well as “All white people are inherently racist” and “All black people are inherently racist.” In its answer, Facebook said it would define hate speech as something that was violent or dehumanizing, statements of inferiority and calls for exclusion or segregation. It did not answer Cruz’s specific questions about the 27 statements listed in his question. Cruz also asked what percentage of the moderators Facebook uses to check posted content were registered as Republicans or Democrats or had donated, volunteered for, interned with or run for office in either party. Facebook responded, “We do not maintain statistics on these data points.” Last month, Facebook said it would bring in advisers to investigate whether it suppresses conservative voices, part of a post-Cambridge Analytica campaign to rebuild trust with users. In the answers, the company also detailed ways its partners were able to gather information about users’ activities even if they’re not logged into Facebook, including information about the purchases they make and the games they play. Questions about how Facebook tracks nonusers during the hearing had illuminated the social network’s digital reach, which many users had either ignored or taken for granted. Despite the length of the responses, many did not actually answer the questions asked. For example, the Committee said it “had become aware that Facebook has surveyed users about whether they trust the company to safeguard their privacy” and asked that Zuckerberg provide the results of any such survey. But in a 326-word reply, Facebook did not say whether it surveyed its users or what it found if it did, instead reiterating, “Privacy is at the core of everything we do. And our approach to privacy starts with our commitment to transparency and control.” Lawmakers have continued to raise the specter of regulation after reports that followed the hearings on Facebook’s data-sharing deals with device makers and other companies. The company says it’s open to privacy regulation — as long as it was “the right regulation.” In its answer to Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., the company offered to write such laws itself. The two separate documents, a 225-page set of answers to the Senate Judiciary Committee and a 229-page set of answers to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation , were posted late Monday. CONNECT 4 COMMENT EMAIL MORE

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Olympian Bode Miller’s 19-Month-Old Daughter Dies After Drowning in Pool: ‘We Are Beyond Devastated’

Olympian Bode Miller’s 19-Month-Old Daughter Dies After Drowning in Pool: ‘We Are Beyond Devastated’ Karen Mizoguchi Bode Miller is mourning the tragic death of his youngest child, 19-month-old daughter Emeline Grier Miller. Emeline drowned in a pool in the neighborhood of Coto de Caza, California, on Sunday, PEOPLE confirms. The Orange County Fire Department says paramedics were rushed to the scene and performed CPR before transporting her to a nearby hospital where she was unable to be resuscitated. The Orange County Coroner’s Office also confirms Emeline’s death. Want all the latest pregnancy and birth announcements, plus celebrity mom blogs? Click here to get those and more in the PEOPLE Babies newsletter . “We are beyond devastated. Our baby girl, Emmy, passed away yesterday. Never in a million years did we think we would experience a pain like this,” Miller, 40, said on Instagram Monday. “Her love, her light, her spirit will never be forgotten. Our little girl loved life and lived it to it’s fullest everyday. Our family respectfully requests privacy during this painful time,” he said. In November 2016, the Olympic alpine skier and his wife, professional beach volleyball player Morgan Beck Miller, welcomed their second child together and his fourth: Nash Skan, 3 , and Miller’s children from previous relationships: son Samuel, 5, and daughter Neesyn, 10. On April 1, Bode and Morgan announced they were expecting their third child. “Happy Easter Sending love from the growing Miller Family,” the couple shared . Devastating news. My deepest condolences to you and your family @MillerBode — lindsey vonn (@lindseyvonn) June 11, 2018 Thoughts and prayers to the Miller family. @MillerBode @MorganEBeck tragic news that you never want to hear. Sending love. — Julia Mancuso (@JuliaMancuso) June 12, 2018 Miller is a six-time Olympic medalist (1 gold, 3 silvers, 2 bronzes), winning gold in the super combined at the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver. He last competed at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi.

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Journalism was a ticket for Oren Dorell to explore the world and make it a better place

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Facebook Email Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Pinterest Journalism was a ticket for Oren Dorell to explore the world and make it a better place USA TODAY reporter Oren Dorell, who died last week, was determined to serve readers no matter the risk. He never could resist getting the ‘real’ story.
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Journalism was a ticket for Oren Dorell to explore the world and make it a better place Owen Ullmann , USA TODAY Published 8:03 a.m. ET June 11, 2018 | Updated 1:54 p.m. ET June 11, 2018 USA TODAY reporter Oren Dorell, who died last week, was determined to serve readers no matter the risk. He never could resist getting the ‘real’ story. Oren Dorell, his wife, Virginia “Ginny” Knapp Dorell, and their sons, Malcolm and Leo. (Photo: Courtesy of Ginny Knapp Dorell)
CONNECT TWEET LINKEDIN 1 COMMENT EMAIL MORE I quickly discovered how courageous and passionate Oren Dorell was during his job interview to be a reporter at USA TODAY in late 2004. He had submitted story samples from being a police reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C., and I was taken with one about what it felt like to be shocked by a Taser.
He had submitted voluntarily to a Taser shock and wrote about what victims underwent when police used it on them. I asked him what it was like? “Excruciating,” he replied. “The most painful thing I ever did.” Why subject yourself to such pain? “How else can I describe to readers how it felt?” he said.
I knew then that he should work for us.
That was Oren: intrepid on assignment, passionate about his work and determined to serve readers at great personal risk. That was why we hired him in January 2005 and why I loved being his editor, colleague and friend for more than 13 years. He was so full of life, love and adventure in everything he did as a journalist, husband, father and friend, that I cannot believe he is gone. Oren, 53, died Friday night after a car struck the motorcycle he was riding in Washington, D.C. The driver of the car faces charges of second-degree murder, driving under the influence and leaving the scene of the collision.
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Oren adored his wife, Ginny, and their two preteen sons, Malcolm and Leo. As someone who frequently broke bread with him, I witnessed how much he relished eating exotic food. As his longtime editor, I can attest how much he thrived on difficult assignments, preferably foreign travel. The riskier, the better. For Oren, the world was a series of intriguing mysteries he wanted to unravel to satisfy his insatiable curiosity and shed light for his readers, who always were in his thoughts.
“Don’t you think readers want to know about that …” he always began his defense when I cut some detail from a story. He often persuaded me to restore the material.
For Oren, danger was just a routine job hazard, whether covering the aftermath of a hurricane, the fighting in eastern Ukraine and Iraq, or a political uprising in Egypt. On one assignment about a hurricane, he decided to use a boat to get closer to a flood-stricken area and almost became a victim when the boat swamped. He shrugged it off, apologizing for getting his work equipment waterlogged.
Whenever he went to a foreign conflict zone, I always gave the same safety speech: Stay in regular contact, don’t venture near live fighting, remember that no story is worth putting your life in grave danger. Yet, he couldn’t resist the lure of getting to the “real” story.
When he was covering a conflict between Ukrainian national troops and Russian-backed separatists, I warned him repeatedly to stay away from the fighting in Donetsk in eastern Ukraine. Then one day, I received a phone call from him and could hear rocket fire in the background.
“Where are you?” I shouted.
“Pinned down inside the airport, where the two sides are firing,” he explained.
“I told you not to go close to live fighting,” I yelled.
“Well, the rebels said there is no fighting between 1 and 3 p.m., so I went then,” he said sheepishly. “I guess they didn’t observe the truce this time.”
Fortunately, Oren avoided personal injury. And he captured a jewel of a story. An elderly woman and her cat had become trapped in her tiny apartment in an otherwise deserted building near the airport and she was desperate to find a haven for both of them, as well as food and water. His moving story about the woman’s plight touched readers around the world. Local residents helped relocate her and her cat to a safer apartment, and readers donated money to help the woman. Oren went to great lengths to ensure that every penny went toward the welfare of the woman and her cat. I was never more proud of him as a journalist, and he was never happier to have made a difference for the better in someone’s life.
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That is what Oren was about. Journalism was a ticket for him to explore our vast world, as well as a calling to make the world a better, more understandable place. Readers always came first for him. He wanted to explain complex international issues, in an accurate and balanced manner. On occasion, he complained that a story by one of our freelance writers on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was unfair to Israel because it left out important context; other times he pointed out that a freelancer’s story was unfair to Palestinians by leaving out pertinent information.
More recently, he wrote analyses that explained complex and controversial foreign policy issues in ways that average readers could grasp, from U.S.-Russian relations, to the Iran nuclear deal that President Trump scrapped, to Trump’s upcoming summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.
Oren’s tragic death is an unspeakable loss to his family and friends. It also is a huge loss to journalism and the enlightenment of readers. His passion, courage and love of adventure will always live in my heart.
Owen Ullmann, managing editor for special projects at USA TODAY, is a former world editor for the newspaper and was Oren Dorell’s editor for many years.
You can read diverse opinions from our Board of Contributors and other writers on the Opinion front page , on Twitter @usatodayopinion and in our daily Opinion newsletter . To respond to a column, submit a comment to letters@usatoday.com.
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