Elon Musk and His Mini-Sub Are in Thailand to Assist With Rescue Mission

Elon Musk and His Mini-Sub Are in Thailand to Assist With Rescue Mission

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The mission to rescue the 12 boys and their football coach, who had become trapped in a series of caves in Thailand, continues today. Eight of the boys have already been rescued, while four remain. Elon Musk recently pledged his team’s help in rescuing the group.
The SpaceX and Tesla founder developed and tested a “kid-sized” submarine that he suggested might be able to assist with the rescue. It is currently unclear whether Musk or his technology will be used in the rescue efforts, but Musk confirmed via tweet that the submarine is in Thailand and ready to be used if needed. Just returned from Cave 3. Mini-sub is ready if needed. It is made of rocket parts & named Wild Boar after kids’ soccer team. Leaving here in case it may be useful in the future. Thailand is so beautiful. pic.twitter.com/EHNh8ydaTT
— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) July 9, 2018
An international team of rescuers has been in Thailand since the discovery of the stranded football team and their coach, assisting the Thai Navy SEALs in their rescue efforts. The team was trapped in a cave system after heavy rains forced them deeper into the caves in search of higher ground. On Friday, a former Thai Navy diver who had volunteered to help with the rescue, Saman Gunan, lost consciousness and died on an oxygen supply mission.
The third and hopefully final rescue mission is currently underway. If all goes according to plan, the remaining boys, their coach, and the doctor and Navy SEAL divers who have been with them in the cave will be brought out today.
Check out the submarine in action below.
Musk has been tweeting about the rescue mission for the last few days. Some naysayers have suggested Musk’s arrival in Thailand is a PR stunt, with some suggesting that it is disrespectful for the CEO to insert himself into the conversation. Elon Musk peacocking over the Thai cave rescue (which he is not involved in) is astonishing cold egoism even for him
— joanne mcneil (@jomc) July 8, 2018 9 out of 12 boys safe in Thailand. Meanwhile, half the Internet believes @elonmusk did it
— Bertel Schmitt 🎩🎩 (@BertelSchmitt) July 9, 2018
Whatever the case may be, everyone involved appears focused on getting the remaining people out of the cave and to safety.
In other news, Starbucks is removing plastic straws from all stores. Read more here .

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Jaden Smith Uploads New Album on Instagram

Jaden Smith Uploads New Album on Instagram
Jaden Smith has unveiled a new album entirely via his Instagram . SYRE: The Electric Album is a reworking of last year’s full-length SYRE in new ‘electric’ versions of certain tracks. As of press time, the album is not available on any streaming services. Check it all out below:
Just a few weeks ago, Jaden dropped a new single with an incredible accompanying visual called “GHOST,” a collaboration with production-duo Christian Rich. It also happened to contain the phrase “Erys Will Return,” a clear indication of this new electric version of his 2017 full-length.
In related news, Will Smith blessed us with an incredible anecdote about JAY-Z’s admiration for his slapping skills in a new interview with TIDAL. Get the scoop on that here . Music Editor

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As Cape Cod sees Great White uptick, swimmers stay in water for closer look…

Google Plus Erin Clark for the Boston Globe People at Nauset Beach on Sunday. By Sophia Eppolito and Marek Mazurek Globe Correspondents July 08, 2018 On Cape Cod, sharks have become an accepted part of the local lifestyle.
Souvenir shops are filled with shark-themed items: snow globes, jewelry, stuffed animals, even fossilized shark teeth.
A purple flag emblazoned with a white shark flies at Nauset Beach year-round, indicating the presence of dangerous marine life. Safety signs reading “Be Shark Smart” welcome visitors entering the Orleans waterfront.
Advertisement But most beachgoers don’t seem too concerned about the recent uptick in shark sightings up and down the Cape.
Get Fast Forward in your inbox: Forget yesterday’s news. Get what you need today in this early-morning email. Over the past week, 10 great white sharks have been spotted off the Cape’s shoreline, according to sharktivity , a shark-tracking app from the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy.
New England’s shark season officially kicked off early last month when marine biologists detected three great whites off the coast of Cape Cod .
“It’s the way of life on the outer Cape,” said Wrentham resident Cathy Caillouette as she watched her children and husband play in the crowded water off of Nauset Beach Sunday.
Sharks have become pretty standard on the Massachusetts shoreline, Caillouette said.
Advertisement “I think being on the national seashore, it definitely gives me pause, but I think as long as you pay attention to what the beach says, then you’ll be fine,” she said.
Erin Clark for the Boston Globe David Caillouette waded in the ocean with his twins, Aidan (left) and Madeline, 5, in Orleans.
Orleans native Wendy Kula, 43, has been surfing in the area for nearly 20 years.
Although sharks aren’t typically at the forefront of her mind, Kula said she takes safety precautions when going out on the water, making sure to never surf alone or at night.
Her husband, Griffin Fernandez, 54, said he isn’t too concerned about sharks, because there hasn’t been a fatal attack in Massachusetts since 1936. The most recent nonfatal attack was in 2014 near Manomet Point in Plymouth.
“Your drive to the beach is more dangerous than being in the water,” he said.
Advertisement At Lighthouse Beach in Chatham Sunday, beachgoers also seemed largely undisturbed by the presence of sharks.
“They’re moving in to feed,” said Kevan Fulmer of Williamstown, who was set up with three fishing poles on the beach, looking for flukes and sea trout. “They’re on vacation too.”
Beach safety personnel urge beachgoers to use common sense if they encounter a shark.
“If you see something, say something,” said Chatham beach patrol supervisor Colin Politi. “Report it; don’t keep it to yourself. Get out of the water and use common sense. A lot of people forget that last one.”
Politi said the most common way for sharks to be detected along the Cape is by spotters in planes who radio the sightings to the various harbor masters, who then relay the news to on-duty lifeguards and beach patrol personnel. If a shark gets too close to swimmers, safety personnel will generally order everyone out of the water.
Experts believe shark sightings are linked to the increasing population of seals on the Cape. A study released in 2017 by the journal Bioscience estimated there are as many as 50,000 seals in Southeastern Massachusetts.
Massachusetts native Dianne Tomassetti, 55, said she makes sure to avoid the seals during shark season. “All the seals are out there and of course the sharks are going to be looking for dinner,” she said.
Not everyone is comfortable with the idea of sharks swimming in such close proximity to them.
Elyse Schuerman of Winchester said she owns a property in South Chatham but wouldn’t want to own a house near Lighthouse Beach, “because of the sharks.”
Politi says beachgoers come to him daily with questions about what to do in case of a shark sighting and whether his crew has seen any recently.
Vanessa Steck, who was at Lighthouse Beach with Schuerman, said she has a healthy respect for sharks.
“I feel slightly apprehensive of the sharks, but I also want to see one,” said Steck, who works as a nanny. “It may be fine now, but with climate change, I wouldn’t be surprised if the problem got worse.”
That curiosity can lead to problems, Politi said, as swimmers will sometimes stay in the water for a closer look instead of getting themselves to safety.
“It’s always alluring; they’re powerful beasts,” Politi said. “[People] will see reports and try to see it.”
When in doubt, the best course of action is to listen to the professionals, Politi said.
“We’re not trying to ruin anyone’s beach day. We’re trying to make sure people come home whole,” Politi said.
Sophia Eppolito can be reached at sophia.eppolito@globe.com . Marek Mazurek can be reached at marek.mazurek@globe.com . Loading comments…

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‘It’s actually shocking how archaic’ Ontario’s criminal courts are

By Jacques Gallant Legal Affairs Reporter Mon., July 9, 2018
Justice Delayed: Part 1 of 3
“I can’t wait any longer.” Modernization at courthouses like Toronto’s Old City Hall falls under the responsibility of the Ontario government, which funds the courts. While the previous Liberal government instituted some technological advancements on the civil and family side, next to nothing was added on the criminal side. ( Lucas Oleniuk / Toronto Star ) Criminal defence lawyer Annamaria Enenajor describes processes in the court system as “dinosaur era-type administration.” ( Annamaria Enenajor )
The defence lawyer has been in court for nearly an hour, and court staff are still unable to locate the “Information” for his client, a few pieces of paper that outline the charges, but also past and future court dates for the accused — which are handwritten and not always legible.
The up-to-date Information is not available on a computer. Without it, the case can’t be heard.
The lawyer says he’ll have to leave a note about the next steps for the case with duty counsel, the legal aid-funded lawyer who can assist accused persons during court appearances. That is, of course, if they ever find the Information. The clerk has called the court support counter more than once but no one is picking up. Article Continued Below
It’s a busy May morning in the rather humid and chaotic set-date court at Toronto’s Old City Hall, possibly the busiest courthouse in Canada, where numerous lawyers, paralegals and self-represented litigants parade in front of the justice of the peace, while a Crown attorney with a stack of files next to him tries to keep the routine appearances moving as quickly as possible.
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Part 2: How the underfunding of legal aid is clogging up the justice system
Some of these individuals will wait nearly an hour or more for appearances that will last less than a minute, during which they’ll set the next court date to provide an update in their case, receive further disclosure of evidence from the Crown, or possibly even set a date for the actual trial.
There are problems. A cracked DVD provided by the Crown as part of its disclosure in one case doesn’t work. Missing Informations mean individuals will have to wait even longer for their brief appearance.
At 11:45 a.m., the justice of the peace apologizes to a man who has been waiting for his case to be heard since 9 a.m. But they have now found the Information in his case. It is then quickly adjourned to a date in June. Article Continued Below
“It’s actually shocking how archaic the criminal court process is,” criminal defence lawyer Annamaria Enenajor told the Star. “One of the biggest revolutions that hit the criminal courts in the last five years is that disclosure no longer came in paper form; it now came on CD.
“This is dinosaur era-type administration. So many times I’ve had to physically chase my client’s Information … God forbid that one copy gets misplaced.”
Delays and the inefficiencies that can cause them have come under heightened scrutiny since the Supreme Court of Canada’s landmark 2016 ruling R v. Jordan, which set strict timelines to bring criminal cases to trial: 18 months in provincial court (such as at Old City Hall) and 30 months in Superior Court, which deals with the most serious criminal offences, including murder.
As part of its response to that ruling, the federal government introduced Bill C-75 in March to revamp the justice system in the hopes of making it more efficient.
While the bill — which has been sharply criticized by defence lawyers who say it takes away procedural rights from accused people — does contain some clauses on technology, such as allowing remote appearances via video by an accused person (which already happens in some courts), it doesn’t really touch on many of the day-to-day headaches in court that lawyers say could be improved by technology, which could ultimately reduce delays in the system.
Modernization efforts would fall under the responsibility of the Ontario government, which funds the courts. While the previous Liberal government instituted some technological advancements on the civil and family side — such as the ability to file statements of claim and defence online — next to nothing was added on the criminal side.
“The attorney general is always interested in exploring ways to modernize the legal system and improve wait times through the use of technology,” Jessica Trepanier, spokesperson for Ontario’s new attorney general, Caroline Mulroney, told the Star last week.
Ottawa criminal defence lawyer Michael Spratt describes the overreliance on paper in court as not only inefficient but “shocking,” citing cases that drag on because they literally fall between the cracks.
“I wanted to transfer an Information from the remand court to just two courtrooms over, and it took two hours because they couldn’t find the Information. It fell between the court reporter’s table and the clerk’s table,” he said.
“Having a system for not relying on physical attendance in court to case manage or to shepherd matters through the early stages would free up judicial resources and court space for conducting trials.”
Lawyers should be able to conduct “digital or virtual appearances through email” as a way to get the case moving forward without having to take up time and space in court, said Michael Lacy, president of the Criminal Lawyers’ Association. Disclosure should also be available online through a secure server accessible to the defence, along with notifications when new disclosure has been added, Lacy said, calling the current court system “antiquated.”
“Ontario lags behind other jurisdictions, including other jurisdictions within Canada in that regard,” he said.
Both levels of government have said since the Jordan decision that there is no “silver bullet” for reducing delays, but modernizing the justice system in Ontario — notorious for its continued reliance on paper and the fax machine — could prove to be one solution.
“The better use of technology and case management practices will assist judges and their courthouses to address the challenges of delays,” concluded a massive 2017 study by the Senate committee on legal and constitutional affairs.
The committee had studied court delays across the country, and heard testimony from numerous judges, lawyers, academics, bureaucrats and others.
“The committee agrees that, wherever possible, routine appearances should be replaced by having the lawyers and judge log into a shared system and provide whatever key information will move the case forward,” says the report.
In one of their recommendations, the senators urged federal Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould to “take a leadership role” in the design of a computerized system that the provinces could use that would, among other things, allow for routine procedural appearances to take place through a computer, as well as facilitate disclosure.
Ideally, the system would also “provide a user-friendly access portal to unrepresented accused persons, witnesses, victims and other affected parties concerning criminal proceedings in which they are involved,” the senators recommended.
Wilson-Raybould told the committee in her official response that developing such a program falls under the responsibility of the provinces and territories.
“Canada has a two-tiered justice system,” said criminal defence lawyer Daniel Brown. “Wealthy clients pay their lawyers to attend court for them without having to miss time from work, while the most marginalized members of our community are forced to make repeated and unnecessary court appearances.”
All criminal cases in Ontario begin in the Ontario Court of Justice, including the most serious ones, which will eventually move to the Superior Court for trial; that’s what makes the Ontario Court the busiest level of court in Canada.
Technology, or lack thereof, is not so much a cause of delay in Superior Court compared to the lack of resources such as courtrooms, judges and staff, said Norine Nathanson, senior counsel in the office of the chief justice. She said judges are ensuring that pretrials are being used as effectively as possible to identify issues ahead of trial in an effort to reduce delay.
There have been some recent improvements in the Ontario Court of Justice, which includes Old City Hall.
The court has piloted an electronic scheduling tool, “a critically important initiative that will allow the Ontario Court of Justice to more effectively schedule and monitor cases to ensure compliance with Jordan timelines,” said court spokesperson Kate Andrew.
“The investments made in modernization initiatives in the courts are welcome and necessary improvements, but much remains to be done,” she said.
Jacques Gallant is a Toronto-based reporter covering legal affairs. Follow him on Twitter: @JacquesGallant TOP STORIES, DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX. NEW NEWSLETTER HEADLINES More from The Star & Partners LOADING

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Truck driver charged in Humboldt Broncos crash released on $1,000 bail as family launches lawsuit | The Star

MELFORT, SASK.—A transport truck driver charged in a crash that killed 16 people with the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team bus has been released on $1,000 bail.
Jaskirat Sidhu, who is 29 and from Calgary, faces several conditions, including that he not drive and that he surrender his passport.
The wreckage of a fatal crash outside of Tisdale, Sask., is seen April 7. A transport truck driver who was arrested last week in connection with a crash that killed 16 people on the Humboldt Broncos team bus will appear in court in Saskatchewan today. Jaskirat Sidhu, who is 29, is charged with 16 counts of dangerous driving causing death and 13 counts of dangerous driving causing bodily injury. ( JONATHAN HAYWARD / THE CANADIAN PRESS file photo ) Sidhu is charged with 16 counts of dangerous driving causing death and 13 counts of dangerous driving causing bodily injury.
He appeared in a Melfort, Sask., court Tuesday morning, where the case was put over to Aug. 21.
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‘It’s just a step in the process.’ Families relieved as charges laid against Calgary truck driver in Humboldt Broncos bus crash
Scott Thomas, whose son Evan died in the crash, says he felt compelled to go to court.
Thomas says he caught Sidhu’s eye once but just felt empty.
Sixteen people, including 10 players, were killed and 13 players were injured when the junior hockey team’s bus and a transport truck driven by Sidhu crashed at a rural Saskatchewan intersection on April 6.
The hockey team was headed to a playoff game.
Sidhu was not hurt in the crash. He was arrested after the crash but was released the same night.
RCMP have said they will not release any details of the investigation or what they believe happened. The only thing the Mounties have said to this point is that the truck was in the intersection when the collision occurred.
Meanwhile, the family of one of the junior hockey players killed has filed a lawsuit.
The suit, which contains unproven allegations, claims negligence by Sidhu, and also lists as defendants the Calgary trucking company that employed Sidhu as well as the bus manufacturer.
The lawsuit alleges that Sidhu received two weeks of driver training and, on his first time driving the route, failed to stop at a stop sign before hitting the bus.
Russell and Raelene Herold of Montmartre, Sask., filed the statement of claim on behalf of their 16-year-old son, Adam Herold.
In related news, the province of Alberta plans to make driver training for new commercial truckers mandatory as early as January 2019.
Transportation Minister Brian Mason said the rules of the program will be hashed out with Albertans and industry representatives in the coming months to make sure that the changes don’t needlessly restrict business while keeping the roads safe.
He said the province is doing away with an effective 60-day grace period that allows commercial carriers to operate while still working to get their safety fitness certificates, and will also have carriers take a mandatory course on the provincial rules and laws governing their operations.

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