All 13 rescued from flooded Thai cave: navy SEAL unit

All 13 rescued from flooded Thai cave: navy SEAL unit

All 13 rescued from flooded Thai cave: navy SEAL unit Reuters 15 mins ago By John Geddie, Panu Wongcha-um
Video by CBS News
CHIANG RAI, Thailand – All 12 boys and their soccer coach trapped for more than two weeks deep inside a flood Thai cave have been rescued, a Thai navy SEAL unit said on Tuesday, a successful end to a perilous mission that has gripped the world.
“The 12 Wild Boars and coach have emerged from the cave and they are safe,” the Thai navy SEAL unit said on its official Facebook page.
British divers found the 13, hungry and huddled in darkness on a muddy bank in a partly flooded chamber several kilometers inside the complex, on Monday last week.
After pondering for days how to get the 13 out, a rescue operation was launched on Sunday when four of the boys were brought out, tethered to rescue divers.
Slideshow by photo services
Another four were rescued on Monday and the last four boys and the coach were brought out on Tuesday.
Celebrations will be tinged with sadness over the loss of a former Thai navy diver who died last Friday while on a re-supply mission inside the cave in support of the rescue.
The last five were brought out of the cave on stretchers, one by one over the course of Tuesday, and taken by helicopter to a hospital.
Three members of the SEAL unit and an army doctor, who has stayed with the boys since they were found, were the last people due to come out of the cave, the unit said.
Officials have not been commenting on the rescue mission as it has been taking place, so it was not clear what condition those brought out on Tuesday were in.
The eight boys brought out on Sunday and Monday were in good health overall and some asked for chocolate bread for breakfast, officials said earlier.
Two of the boys had suspected lung infections but the four boys from the first group rescued were all walking around in the hospital.
Photos: Rescue mission for Thai soccer team Slideshow by photo services
Authorities have not confirmed the identity of the rescued boys and some of their parents said they had not been told who had been brought out. They were not allowed to visit the hospital where the boys were taken.
The rescued boys had not been identified out of respect for the families whose sons were still trapped, officials had said.
The boys were still being quarantined from their parents because of the risk of infection and would likely be kept in the hospital for a week to undergo tests, officials said earlier on Tuesday.
Reporting by Panu Wongcha-um, Juarawee Kittisilpa, Patpicha Tanakasempipat, John Geddie and James Pomfret in Chiang Rai, and Aukkarapon Niyomyat, Panarat Thepgumpanat, Amy Sawitta Lefevre and Chayut Setboonsarng in Bangkok; writing by James Pomfret; editing by Paul Tait and Robert Birsel

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Trump pardons ranchers in case that inspired 2016 occupation

1 / 3 Oregon Armed Militia Continue to Occupy Wildlife Refuge It began as a rally in support of Dwight Hammond Jr. and Steven Hammond, who reported to prison on Monday. WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has pardoned two ranchers whose case sparked the armed occupation of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon.
Dwight and Steven Hammond were convicted in 2012 of intentionally and maliciously setting fires on public lands. The arson crime carried a minimum prison sentence of five years, but a sympathetic federal judge, on his last day before retirement, decided the penalty was too stiff and gave the father and son much lighter prison terms.
Prosecutors won an appeal and the Hammonds were resentenced in October 2015 to serve the mandatory minimum.
The decision sparked a protest from Ammon Bundy and dozens of others, who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near the Hammond ranch in southeastern Oregon from Jan. 2 to Feb. 11, 2016, complaining the Hammonds were victims of federal overreach.
The armed occupiers changed the refuge’s name to the Harney County Resource Center, reflecting their belief that the federal government has only a very limited right to own property within a state’s borders.
Bundy was arrested during a Jan. 26 traffic stop, effectively ending the protest. Another key occupier, Robert “LaVoy” Finicum, was fatally shot that day by Oregon State Police.
In a statement Tuesday, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders called that decision to resentence the Hammonds “unjust.”
“The Hammonds are devoted family men, respected contributors to their local community, and have widespread support from their neighbors, local law enforcement, and farmers and ranchers across the West,” she said. “Justice is overdue for Dwight and Steven Hammond, both of whom are entirely deserving of these Grants of Executive Clemency.”
The pardons are the latest in a growing list of clemency actions by Trump, who has been using his pardon power with increasingly frequency in recent months.
Trump has been especially pleased with news coverage of his actions, which included commuting the sentence of Alice Johnson, a woman serving a life sentence for drug offenses whose case had been championed by reality television star Kim Kardashian West.
He has repeatedly referenced emotional video of Johnson being freed from prison and running into her family members’ arms, and has said he’s considering thousands more cases — both famous and not.
But critics say the president could be ignoring valid claims for clemency as he works outside the typical pardon process, focusing on cases brought to his attention by friends, famous people and conservative media pundits.
Aides say that Trump has been especially drawn to cases in which he believes the prosecution may have been politically motivated — a situation that may remind him of his own position at the center of the ongoing special counsel investigation into Russian election meddling.
Many have also seen the president as sending a signal with his pardons to former aides and associates caught up in the probe, or lashing out at enemies like former FBI Director James Comey, who oversaw the prosecution of lifestyle guru Martha Stewart, whom Trump has said he is thinking of pardoning.

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Trump set to announce Supreme Court pick

• July 9, 2018 President Trump announced Monday night that Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appellate court judge based in Washington, D.C., is his pick to replace outgoing Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy — a nominee who, if confirmed, will cement a conservative majority on the nation’s highest court. Trump made the announcement from the East Room of the White House. “I’ve often heard that, other than matters of war and peace, this is the most important decision a president will make,” Trump said. “The Supreme Court is entrusted with the safeguarding of the crown jewel of our republic, the Constitution of the United States.” “Judge Kavanaugh has impeccable credentials, unsurpassed qualifications and a proven commitment to equal justice under the law,” the president continued. “Throughout legal circles he is considered a judge’s judge, a true thought leader among his peers. He is a brilliant jurist with a clear and effective writing style universally regarded as one of the finest and sharpest legal minds of our time.” Kavanaugh told Trump was “grateful” and “humbled by your confidence in me.” “Throughout this process I have witnessed first hand your appreciation for the vital role of the American judiciary. No president has ever consulted more widely or talked with more people from more backgrounds to seek input about a Supreme Court nomination,” Kavanaugh said. “Justice Kennedy devoted his career to securing liberty. I am deeply honored to fill his seat on the Supreme Court.” He added: “My judicial philosophy is straightforward: A judge must be independent and must interpret the law, not make the law. A judge must interpret statutes as written and a judge must interpret as written, informed by history and tradition and precedent.” President Trump announces Brett Kavanaugh as his Supreme Court nominee in the East Room of the White House on Monday. (Photo: Evan Vucci/AP) More Kavanaugh worked closely with independent counsel Kenneth Starr during the Whitewater investigation of President Bill Clinton. As documented in the latest episode of the Yahoo News podcast “ Skullduggery ,” Kavanaugh debunked the conspiracy theories that the Clintons were responsible for former aide Vince Foster’s death before becoming the primary author of the report laying out the case for Clinton’s impeachment . Kavanaugh was concerned with the more explicit sexual details of the report and attempted to redact them just before its publication. One of the possible grounds for Clinton’s impeachment in Kavanaugh’s report was the fact Clinton lied to his aides and the American public via his press team. In a 2009 piece for the Minnesota Law Review , Kavanaugh said that he believed presidents should not be subject to civil lawsuits or criminal investigations in office because they were “time-consuming and distracting.” After assisting in George W. Bush’s efforts in the 2000 Florida recount, Kavanaugh joined the White House, first as a counsel to the president and then as a staff secretary. Bush nominated Kavanaugh for a position on the D.C. Circuit in July 2003, but his confirmation took nearly three years because Democrats contended he was too partisan for the federal bench. Kavanaugh was called an “ unqualified judicial nominee ” by the New York Times before his May 2006 confirmation on a 57-36 vote. In 2016, the conservative National Review wrote said that Kavanaugh’s opinions were “ clear, consistent, thorough, and thoughtful ” and had an “analytical clarity” that would make the late Supreme Court Justice Anthony Scalia proud. President Trump with Supreme Court justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his family. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images) More SCOTUSBlog, a news site about the Supreme Court, has described Kavanaugh as “ generally bringing a pragmatic approach ” to his decisions but with a conservative judicial philosophy. In analyzing him as a possible replacement for either Kennedy or Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the blog Empirical SCOTUS said Kavanaugh would most likely be to the right of either Kennedy or Ginsburg on the court, but not as far to the right as Justice Clarence Thomas. In his time on the bench, Kavanaugh has declared the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau unconstitutional and ruled against Obama-era environmental regulations. Kavanaugh’s name being floated as a nominee has caused some infighting on the right, with one group stating that the judge was not anti-abortion enough in a case involving an immigrant girl requesting the procedure. Multiple conservative writers have defended Kavanaugh against this claim. According to the Associated Press, Trump reached a decision earlier in the day. Trump interviewed a total of seven candidates last week and on Monday narrowed his list of finalists to a pair of federal appeals court judges, Brett Kavanaugh and Thomas Hardiman, the New York Times reported Monday . The president had been considering two other judges — Amy Coney Barrett and Raymond Kethledge — before Hardiman emerged as a possible nominee on Sunday . President Trump speaks to reporters before boarding Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, in Morristown, N.J., on Sunday. (Photo: Carolyn Kaster/AP) More Speaking to reporters on Sunday night after spending the weekend at his private golf club in Bedminster, N.J., Trump said he had yet to settle on a nominee but was “getting very close.” “They’re excellent,” the president said about all four of the possible final choices. “Every one. You can’t go wrong.” But on Monday afternoon, both Barrett and Kethledge were at their homes on in Indiana and Michigan, hundreds of miles away from Trump’s primetime spectacle in Washington. “I can’t confirm nor deny anything,” Barrett told reporters, “but you can see that I’m here.” The looming confirmation battle The announcement of Kennedy’s retirement last month sent shock waves across the nation, with Trump and his fellow Republicans poised to shift the court’s ideological balance to the right — and shape the country’s judicial future for generations to come. Abortion has emerged as a key issue in the looming confirmation battle , as Republicans hold a one-vote majority (51-49) in the Senate and need at least 50 to confirm Trump’s pick. Sen. Susan Collins, a Maine Republican who supports abortion rights, said last week that she would not support someone who would overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision that protects a woman’s right to have an abortion. “I believe very much that Roe v. Wade is settled law,” Collins said on ABC’s “This Week.” “A candidate who would overturn Roe v. Wade would not be acceptable to me, because that would indicate an activist agenda that I don’t want to see a judge have.” Collins and Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, were among five GOP senators who met with Trump last month to discuss the Supreme Court vacancy. Both are seen as key swing votes . After Trump’s announcement, Collins issued a statement citing Kavanaugh’s “impressive credentials and extensive experience,” and vowed to “conduct a careful, thorough vetting.” “I look forward to Judge Kavanaugh’s public hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee and to questioning him in a meeting in my office,” she added. “Tonight the president begins a forced march back to the days when women’s health care choices were made by government,” Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said in a statement late Monday evening . “There can be no mistaking Trump’s Supreme Court nomination for anything but what it is: a direct attempt to overturn Roe. v. Wade.” “I am so disheartened that President Trump would choose such a radical, anti-consumer, anti-woman jurist to be his nominee for the Supreme Court,” Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., said in a statement. He added: “There is a fight coming, and I’m ready for it.” Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont issued a similar statement. “Let us be clear: President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will be a rubber-stamp for an extreme, right-wing agenda pushed by corporations and billionaires,” Sanders said. “The coming Senate debate over the replacement of retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy is about the future of Roe v. Wade, campaign finance reform, voting rights, workers’ rights, health care, climate change, environmental protection and gun safety.” He added: “I do not believe a person with those views should be given a lifetime seat on the Supreme Court. We must mobilize the American people to defeat Trump’s right-wing, reactionary nominee.” Dozens of protesters gathered outside the Supreme Court on Monday ahead of Trump’s announcement, and the size of the crowd increased immediately after. Size of crowd growing outside the Supreme Court. pic.twitter.com/w1VOSW7k0M
— Alexander Nazaryan (@alexnazaryan) July 10, 2018 The ‘McConnell rule’ Trump said he expects a swift confirmation of Kennedy’s replacement before the midterm elections. And Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell vowed to vote on Kennedy’s successor “this fall.” But many Democrats said the Senate should follow the standard set by McConnell and refuse to vote on Trump’s next nominee to the high court. President Barack Obama’s choice for Scalia’s replacement, Merrick Garland, was blocked by congressional Republicans, who argued that the seat should be left unfilled until after the 2016 election. “There should be no consideration of a Supreme Court nominee until the American people have a say,” Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., tweeted. “Leader McConnell set that standard when he denied Judge Garland a hearing for nearly a year, and the Senate should follow the McConnell Standard now.” Last week, McConnell reportedly told Trump that Kethledge and Hardiman presented the fewest obstacles to being confirmed. But Leonard Leo, an official of the Federalist Society who is Trump’s top Supreme Court adviser, said Sunday that the pair were lesser known, and it would therefore take longer to line up conservative support for them. “It’s important to have people who are extremely well known and have distinguished records,” Leo said on ABC’s “This Week.” Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., sees no such issues. “Republicans are holding four lottery tickets,” Graham said on “Fox News Sunday.” “And all of them are winners.” The White House invited four Democratic senators from red states — Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama — to Monday night’s event. All four declined to attend. The Mueller probe Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., raised concern over Kavanaugh’s position that a president should be shielded from litigation before leaving office. Trump continues to be dogged by special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation into possible collusion in the 2016 election or potential obstruction of the probe by the president himself. “President Trump is currently a subject of an ongoing criminal investigation,” Booker said in a statement. “There is a clear conflict of interest inherent in the president nominating someone who could be the deciding vote on a number of potential issues from that investigation that could come before the court. Booker continued: “The fact that Kavanaugh believes that a president should not be subject to civil litigation or criminal investigation while in office means that Trump just nominated a justice who has already reached conclusions on these serious questions. That should raise enormous red flags.” Additional reporting by Christopher Wilson, Michael Walsh, Kadia Tubman and Laina Yost.

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NFLPA Files Grievance Over NFL’s New National Anthem Policy

NFLPA Files Grievance Over NFL’s New National Anthem Policy Sports Illustrated 1 day ago Chris Chavez Click to expand Replay Video UP NEXT How many more years will Saban coach at Alabama? BamaOnline’s Travis Reier takes a look at how long Nick Saban might stay coaching at Alabama. CBS Sports LeSean McCoy investigated for involvement in attack on ex-girlfriend Police in Georgia investigating allegations that Buffalo Bills star LeSean McCoy was behind a violent attack on his former girlfriend. A photo provided by her lawyer yesterday shows her apparent injuries. Mark Strassmann reports. CBS News Why Cousins to the Warriors is a win for the NBA SportsPulse: Trysta Krick on why DeMarcus Cousins joining the Golden State Warriors is actually a good thing for the NBA. USA TODAY SPORTS 1 Cancel SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO NFLPA files grievance over anthem policy Sports Illustrated See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next How many more years will Saban coach at Alabama? CBS Sports 1:07 LeSean McCoy investigated for involvement in attack on ex-girlfriend CBS News 2:28 Why Cousins to the Warriors is a win for the NBA USA TODAY SPORTS 2:49 Freshman set to emerge as the Ducks’ next star CBS Sports 1:38 Alexi Lalas, Kelly Smith discuss France’s 1-0 semifinal win FOXSports 4:39 Tepper adamant he’ll change culture in Panthers organization NFL 1:21 France’s Kante may be best player in World Cup Sports Illustrated 2:34 NFLPA files grievance over anthem policy Sports Illustrated 1:03 Why Melo, Rockets are perfect match Sports Illustrated 0:56 How will Harper’s struggles affect free agency? FOXSports 2:48 7 teams interested in Machado CBS Sports 1:15 College football’s ‘unfireable’ coaches Sports Media Group 2:48 Rethinking Kevin Knox’s draft value CBS Sports 1:22 Biggest questions for Ohio St. entering preseason camp CBS Sports 1:18 Early impressions of Shai Gilgeous-Alexander CBS Sports 1:22 UP NEXT The NFL Players Association announced it has filed a grievance challenging the league’s new national anthem policy.
In May, NFL owners unanimously approved a new anthem policy that requires players to stand if they are on the field during the performance of the Star-Spangled Banner. The new policy gives players the option to remain in the locker room, if they want. The NFL subjects the teams to a fine, if a player or a member of team personnel does not show respect for the anthem.
Players have been kneeling, sitting and raising fists during the national anthem in an effort to raise awareness for racial and social injustice in America since Colin Kaepernick took a knee before a preseason game in 2016.
“Our union filed its non-injury grievance today on behalf of all players challenging the NFL’s recently imposed anthem policy. The union’s claim is that this new policy, imposed by the NFL’s governing body without consultation with the NFLPA, is inconsistent with the collective bargaining agreement and infringes on player rights.
In advance of our filing today, we proposed to the NFL to begin confidential discussions with the NFLPA Executive Committee to find a solution to this issue instead of immediately proceeding with litigation. The NFL has agreed to proceed with those discussions and we look forward to starting them soon.”
The NFL’s protests during the national anthem have drawn criticism from President Donald Trump. Jerry Jones and Bob McNair are among the NFL owners that have called on players to stand. Kaepernick and his former 49ers teammate Eric Reid have both filed collusion cases against the NFL.

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94. Good Thing – Leon Bridges

℗ 2018 LisaSawyer63, Inc. under license to Columbia Records, a Division of Sony Music Entertainment Leon Bridges Leon Bridges’ first strides as an R&B artist prompted comparisons to legends like Sam Cooke and Otis Redding, but the native Texan quickly came into his own with the remarkably refined Top Ten albums Coming Home (2015) and Good Thing (2018), the former of which led to a pair of Grammy nominations. Bridges expanded his audience with featured appearances on songs by artists ranging from the similarly tradition-rooted likes of Nick Waterhouse, Kacey Musgraves, and Gary Clark, Jr. to rappers Macklemore and Lecrae and production duo ODESZA. These collaborations, along with the broader stylistic scope of the second full-length, demonstrated that the singer, songwriter, and guitarist was no mere throwback stylist.The singer, songwriter, and guitarist born Todd Michael Bridges honed his talent performing in and around his native Fort Worth, Texas, and stirred up music industry interest with SoundCloud uploads of analog recordings produced by Niles City Sound’s Joshua Block and Austin Jenkins, then of White Denim. Signed to major-label Columbia, Bridges’ first singles, including a rich ballad written about his mother, appeared in February 2015 with a sound that evoked mid- to late-’60s soul. His debut album, Coming Home, followed four months later. It debuted at number six on the Billboard 200 and was nominated for a Grammy in the category of Best R&B Album. The video for one of the album’s highlights, “River,” was nominated as well.During 2016 and 2017, Bridges was active primarily as a performer and collaborator. He co-wrote and was featured on Macklemore & Ryan Lewis'”Kevin,” Nick Waterhouse’s “Katchi,” and Kacey Musgraves'”Present Without a Bow.” Additionally, he recorded “On My Own” with Lecrae (for Birth of a Nation: The Inspired by Album) and connected twice with Gary Clark, Jr., as heard on Live North America 2016, and on a collaborative cover of Neil Young’s “Ohio.” Work with Aminé and ODESZA was also out by the end of 2017. Early the following year, Coming Home was certified gold by the RIAA. Shortly thereafter, Bridges released “Bet Ain’t Worth the Hand” and “Bad Bad News,” and then “Beyond,” as the first three songs off his comparatively contemporary and stylistically broader second album, Good Thing, which followed that May and hit the Top Ten. ~ Andy Kellman HOMETOWN

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