Facebook faces £500,000 fine from UK data watchdog – BBC News

Facebook faces £500,000 fine from UK data watchdog – BBC News

Facebook faces £500,000 fine from UK data watchdog 11 July 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Information commissioner Elizabeth Denham says Facebook’s fines will damage its reputation The UK’s data protection watchdog intends to fine Facebook £500,000 for data breaches – the maximum allowed.
The Information Commissioner’s Office said Facebook had failed to ensure another company – Cambridge Analytica – had deleted users’ data.
The ICO will also bring a criminal action against Cambridge Analytica’s defunct parent company SCL Elections.
And it has raised concerns about political parties buying personal information from “data brokers”.
Specifically it named one company used by the Labour Party, Emma’s Diary, which gives medical advice and free baby-themed products to parents.
Facebook said it would respond to the report “soon”.
The ICO also said another company – Aggregate IQ – which worked with the Vote Leave campaign in the run up to the EU Referendum, must stop processing UK citizens’ data.
The fine is modest compared with previous sanctions on Facebook.
In 2017 it was fined 110m euros (£95m) by the European Commission, which in the same year punished Google for 2.42bn euros (£2.1bn).
But information commissioner Elizabeth Denham said companies also worried about reputational damage.
The impact of behavioural advertising, when it came to elections, was “significant” and called for a code of practice to “fix the system”, she said.
Such a code would ensure that “elections are fair and people understand how they are being micro-targeted”.
The action comes 16 months after the ICO began its probe into political campaigners’ use of personal data following concerns raised by whistleblower Christopher Wylie , among others.
The ICO found Facebook had breached its own rules and failed to make sure Cambridge Analytica had deleted this personal data.
While Cambridge Analytica insisted it had indeed wiped the data after Facebook’s erasure request in December 2015 , the ICO said it had seen evidence that copies of the data had been shared with others.
“This potentially brings into question the accuracy of the deletion certificates provided to Facebook,” said an ICO spokesperson. Lifestyle information
The ICO has also written to the UK’s 11 main political parties telling them to have their data protection practices inspected.
It is concerned the parties may have bought lifestyle information about members of the public from data brokers, who might have not have obtained the necessary consent.
Naming Emma’s Diary, the ICO said it was concerned about how transparent the firm had been about its political activities. Image copyright Emma’s Diary Image caption Emma’s Diary requires users to download an app to get a free bundle of baby-themed goods
It said that the Labour Party had confirmed using the firm, but did not provide other details except that it intended to take some form of regulatory action.
The service’s owner Lifecycle Marketing told the BBC it did not agree with the ICO’s initial findings.
“For over 25 years we have operated with integrity and within the spirit of data regulation,” said a spokeswoman.
“As the ICO investigation continues we will freely cooperate… and cannot comment further at this stage.” What else has Facebook been fined for here?
Looking wider, the ICO noted Facebook had been the biggest recipient of digital advertising by political parties and campaigns to date.
Yet, it said, the US firm had neither done enough to explain to its members how they were being targeted as a consequence, nor given them enough control over how their sensitive personal data was used.
As a result, it said, Facebook was guilty of a second breach of the Data Protection Act.
Facebook has a chance to respond to the Commissioner’s Notice of Intent, after which a final decision will be made.
The tech firm’s chief privacy officer issued a brief response.
“As we have said before, we should have done more to investigate claims about Cambridge Analytica and take action in 2015,” said Erin Egan.
“We have been working closely with the ICO in their investigation of Cambridge Analytica, just as we have with authorities in the US and other countries. We’re reviewing the report and will respond to the ICO soon.” How will Cambridge Analytica be dealt with?
Cambridge Analytica, which claimed it could swing elections, and its parent SCL Elections, shut down in May.
But the ICO said it was still taking legal steps to bring a criminal prosecution.
The basis for this would be that SCL Elections had failed to properly respond to an earlier demand that it give a US academic a copy of any personal information it held on him along with an explanation as to its source and usage. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption In March, Cambridge Analytica offices were searched by ICO officers
Bearing in mind SCL Elections is now out of business, the ICO said it might consider taking action against the company’s directors. How is AggregateIQ involved?
The ICO said it had established that the Canadian data analytics firm AggregateIQ – AIQ – had access to UK voters’ personal data provided by the Brexit referendum’s Vote Leave campaign.
It said it was now investigating whether this information had been transferred and accessed outside the UK and whether this amounted to a breach of the data protection act.
The watchdog added that it continued to investigate to what degree AIQ and SCL Elections had shared UK personal data.
And it said it had served an enforcement notice forbidding AIQ from continuing to make use of a list of UK citizens’ email addresses and names that it still holds. What else is the regulator doing?
Other action includes: an investigation into allegations that Arron Banks’ Eldon Insurance Services illegally shared customer data with the Leave.EU group he co-founded, and used the business’ call centre staff to make calls on behalf of the campaign – claims the firm has previously denied a probe into the collection and sharing of personal data by the official Remain campaign – Britain Stronger In Europe – and a linked data broker an audit of the University of Cambridge’s Psychometrics Centre. The department carries out its own research into social media profiles. The ICO said it had been told of an alleged security breach involving one of the centre’s apps and had additional concerns about its data protection efforts a call for the government to introduce a code of practice limiting how personal information can be used by political campaigns before the next general election efforts to ensure ex-staff from SCL Elections and Cambridge Analytica do not illegally use materials obtained from the business before its collapse
The ICO said it expects the next stage of its investigation to be complete by the end of October. Related Topics

Read More…

Fox News Politics Editor: Trump Will ‘Defecate All Over Everything’ In Europe

MEDIA 07/11/2018 01:01 am ET Fox News Politics Editor: Trump Will ‘Defecate All Over Everything’ In Europe Chris Stirewalt said Trump will realign the United States with Russia instead of Europe. By Ed Mazza 250 Fox News politics editor Chris Stirewalt had a colorful way of describing President Donald Trump ’s trip to Europe this week.
Stirewalt told anchor Shannon Bream that Republicans in the U.S. Senate “ will not stop Donald Trump from undermining NATO ” nor will they be able to prevent the president “from realigning U.S. foreign policy to be more favorable towards Russia.”
“He is going to do it,” Stirewalt predicted.
In comments posted on Mediaite, he said:
“And the Republicans who say, ‘Well, we have a broad foreign policy apparatus and we forced him to impose these sanctions, and we forced him to do these things.’ He’s going to fly into Brussels like a seagull. He is going to defecate all over everything, squawk and fly away is what he’s going to do in Brussels. And the Europeans are going to continue to say to each other, ‘We don’t have a reliable partner in the U.S. government right now.’”
He also said Trump will succeed in realigning U.S. policy away from Europe and toward Russia. The only question is whether it’s temporary or lasting.
See the full discussion above. The comments about Europe begin at 26:30.
Download BEFORE YOU GO Ed Mazza Overnight Editor,

Read More…

Heatwave reveals submerged Mourne history at Spelga Dam – BBC News

Heatwave reveals submerged Mourne history at Spelga Dam By Iain McDowell BBC News NI 11 July 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Ivor Anderson Image caption Hundreds of people have made the most of the heatwave to walk the usually-submerged road It is not quite the Lost City of Atlantis but at the gateway to County Down’s Mourne mountains a hidden-underwater history has been revealed.
Spelga Reservoir is often full to the brim with water stored to serve parts of counties Down and Armagh.
But the recent heatwave and dry weather has caused its supply to drop, exposing what lies on the reservoir bed. Image caption The old road cut through Deer’s Meadow before Spelga Dam was constructed in the 1950s
Hundreds of people have been visiting the dam to walk along an old road that usually sits well below the waterline.
The reservoir covers an area known as Deer’s Meadow, which was flooded after Spelga Dam was constructed in the 1950s, creating the 600,000sq m (6.46 million sq ft) basin.
Dividing the meadow was a road that passed between the mountains, connecting Hilltown village on one side of the Mournes with the fishing town of Kilkeel on the other. Image copyright Ivor Anderson Image caption The bridge was built to cross what was the source of the River Bann
It too was submerged, with a new road built in its place on higher ground around the area of the reservoir – it is the one that is used to this day.
Now standing well above the water’s surface is the old, original road that dates back to the early-1800s and features a small bridge that spanned the River Bann, which originates at nearby Slieve Muck.
Dr Arthur Mitchell, a well-known figure in the Mournes, remembers travelling on the old road before the dam was built. Report End of Facebook post by History of Newcastle, Co. Down
He worked as a GP in the area for almost 40 years and formed the Mourne Heritage Trust, a conservation group that looks after the mountain range.
“I lived in Downpatrick at the time and I drove over the old road up through Spelga – it was an exceptionally busy road,” he said.
“The new road had to be built because the old road ran directly through the valley, so the new road had to detour round the dam and fall away down the valley towards Hilltown.” Image copyright Ivor Anderson Image caption The heatwave had led to parts of the reservoir bed being exposed for the first time in years
Even with the introduction of a hosepipe ban in Northern Ireland at the end of June in a bid to save water, Spelga Reservoir has continued to drain.
While its water level does occasionally dip to a point at which you can see the surface of the old road, it is much less frequent to get a chance to see the bridge – the last time was in 2014.
Now in his 80s, Dr Mitchell has passed along the more recent road around the reservoir many hundreds of times. Report End of Twitter post by @JMcMullenEP
“I have seen Spelga very low before but I don’t think it’s been so exposed for such a prolonged time as it has been this summer,” he said.
“The ground around the bridge is exposed too and the original riverbed – the source of the Bann – is clearly visible at the minute under the original road because the water has fallen so dramatically.”
Before Deer’s Meadow was flooded it was a prime site for cutting turf for fuelling fires, with farmers from the nearby towns and villages making their way up to it both for work and for play, according to Dr Mitchell. Image caption Water in Spelga Reservoir is used to supply major towns like Banbridge and Portadown
“Many’s a one, when they were cutting turf, ended up with a woman from Hilltown or a woman from Kilkeel – turf cutting was also a social affair.”
Dairy cows grazed on the neighbouring and aptly-named Butter Mountain and pigs were farmed on Slieve Muck, which overlooks Spelga.
The tree stumps on the reservoir bed – now exposed as the water has receded – have a wartime tale to tell. Image caption Visitors to the reservoir are seeing a special part of Mourne history, says Dr Arthur Mitchell
“They are mostly Scots pine and they provided virtually all of the firewood for the Kilkeel and Hilltown areas during the coal strike after World War One,” said Dr Mitchell.
And the reservoir’s low level is giving new generations an insight in to what were once the ways of life.
“It proves that there was a road through the centre of the Mournes and that those previous social habits and work took place in the mountains – it makes hearsay a reality.”

Read More…

BBC World News: Kylie Jenner to be youngest self-made billionaire – Forbes

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The reality television star is set to hit the milestone earlier than Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg Keeping Up with the Kardashians star Kylie Jenner is worth $900m (£680m) at just 20 years of age, says Forbes.
The business magazine said the social media star is on track to become “the youngest-ever self-made billionaire”.
The fashion guru, the youngest of the Kardashian clan, started selling her own cosmetics three years ago.
Her most famous sibling, Kim Kardashian West, 37, has a notably lower net worth of $350m.
Ms Jenner, who is still currently not old enough even to legally drink alcohol in the US, will turn 21 in August as her Forbes cover edition hits newsstands.
“What her half-sister Kim Kardashian West did for booty, Jenner has done for full lips,” Forbes writes, describing her famous pout.
Earlier this week Ms Jenner, a mother of one daughter named Stormi, announced she would stop receiving lip injections, known as dermal fillers. Image copyright Reuters Image caption The influential beauty mogul has more than 110m followers on Instagram
She admitted during an episode of Keeping Up With The Kardashians in 2015 that her natural lips had been “an insecurity” that she wanted to change with temporary lip fillers.
She later launched her brand Kylie Cosmetics, which included a line of lip products designed to help customers make their lips look bigger through over-lining and filling.

Read More…

Trump’s barrage of attacks ‘beyond belief,’ reeling NATO diplomats say – The White House News

Trump’s barrage of attacks ‘beyond belief,’ reeling NATO diplomats say By Zachary Cohen, Michelle Kosinski and Barbara Starr, CNN Updated 6:29 AM EDT, Thu July 12, 2018
Washington (CNN) NATO diplomats are dumbfounded by President Donald Trump’s barrage of acidic rhetoric at the annual summit in Brussels on Wednesday.
Trump came out brawling in his first public comments, accusing NATO ally Germany of being “a captive of Russia,” calling members of the alliance “delinquent” in their defense spending and insisting they increase it “immediately.”
“It’s like the world has gone crazy this morning,” one senior European diplomat told CNN. “Trump’s performance was beyond belief.”
The President’s remarks sent officials scrambling for answers, triggered ripples of dismay among defense officials and alarmed members of Trump’s own party enough that one worried aloud the President is trying to “tear down” the 29-member alliance. The Republican-controlled House, usually careful to stay in lockstep with Trump, passed a resolution to send a “strong message of support” for NATO.
“This is very confusing,” another senior European diplomat said. Referring to Trump’s targeting of Germany, this envoy said, “the attacks before, and now this tremendous stuff today. It doesn’t make any sense. We’re still in the process of analyzing it.” ‘Punch our friends’
Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker told CNN he was concerned that that Trump is trying to “tear down” NATO and ” punch our friends in the nose .” The Tennessee Republican said he supports the notion of getting NATO countries to increase their defense spending, but he said Trump’s rhetoric is “damaging to us.”
House Speaker Paul Ryan said that he subscribes “to the view that we should not be criticizing our president while he is overseas, but let me say a couple of things. NATO is indispensable.”
Among NATO defense officials, there were quiet questions about how long US Defense Secretary James Mattis — a former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO and strong believer in alliances — could stay on in Trump’s administration. For the second year, Trump was throwing a tantrum at NATO and Mattis was having to clean up after him.
Publicly, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg and European leaders pushed back against Trump’s blistering attacks on Germany and other partner nations, as they attempted to downplay notions that the alliance may be fracturing.
“The strength of NATO is that despite these differences, we have always been able to unite around our core task to protect and defend each other because we understand that we are stronger together than apart,” Stoltenberg told Trump over breakfast.
Other NATO leaders emphasized their public support for the alliance, implicitly pushing back on Trump’s attacks.
British Prime Minister Theresa May used a press conference Wednesday to declare that “NATO is as vital to us today as it ever has been.” At a time when Trump’s provocative bluster increasingly raises questions about his commitment to NATO, May finished her sentence by declaring that “the UK’s commitment to it remains as steadfast as ever.”
One NATO diplomat went as far as to credit Trump for spearheading discussions on burden-sharing — ignoring the President’s tendency to misrepresent statistics in order to bolster his argument.
“Allies are spending more thanks to the President,” the diplomat said. “Last year was the biggest increase in 25 years.”
But public reassurances about the strength of NATO have done little to ease the sense of unease that has been building among the US’ closest allies, particularly as Trump continued to single out Germany.
“What good is NATO if Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for gas and energy? Why are there only 5 out of 29 countries that have met their commitment? The U.S. is paying for Europe’s protection, then loses billions on Trade. Must pay 2% of GDP IMMEDIATELY, not by 2025,” he tweeted Wednesday.
The new German ambassador to the US conveyed some of the simmering unease in her country and beyond during a Wednesday interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, when he asked whether her country thinks Trump would honor Article 5, the alliance commitment to come to a member’s aid if they’re attacked. The only time it’s been invoked was for the US, after the attacks of September 11, 2001. (LtoR) German Chancellor Angela Merkel, US President Donald Trump and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras pose for a family picture ahead of the opening ceremony of the NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) summit, at the NATO headquarters in Brussels, on July 11, 2018. (Photo by LUDOVIC MARIN / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)
The second time Blitzer asked Ambassador Emily Haber, she said, “I understand that all NATO members and all NATO countries stand by in a steadfast manner by Article 5.” It took a third question from Blitzer – “so that is a yes?” – before Haber responded with a definitive “yes.”
“I believe that all NATO members stand by Article 5,” Haber said. “No doubt was cast on the credibility of Article 5.”
Trump, despite his attacks on Germany, insisted to reporters in Brussels that he and Merkel have a “very, very good relationship.”
A third European diplomat said Trump may be targeting Germany and its chancellor in an attempt to win points at home with his base and to deflect attention from his own fawning treatment of Russian President Vladimir Putin ahead of their summit in Helsinki on July 16.
“Targeting Merkel, especially her immigration strategy in the past, is exactly what he wants to attack,” the diplomat said, noting that Trump’s previous criticism of the German leader’s immigration policy has resonated with his own political base at home.
“She has allowed in a lot of immigrants. He’s found that these attacks work, and can produce a great deal of damage. Some will make this a big issue,” the source added. ‘Blaming others’
“Second, the President is under attack himself for the way he treats Putin and the way he may treat Putin in Helsinki,” this diplomat said, who suggested Trump’s approach was “part of his strategy of blaming others.”
The situation only became more complicated later in the day when Trump suggested NATO leaders increase their defense spending to 4% — doubling the 2% target that many NATO countries have yet to meet.
“President Trump wants to see our allies share more of the burden and at a very minimum meet their already stated obligations,” White House press secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed in a statement.
But according to the latest numbers from NATO, the US doesn’t even spend as much as Trump is calling on other countries to.
Asked whether Trump had suggested allies raise their defense spending to 4% of GDP, Stoltenberg said, “I will focus on what we have agreed, and we have agreed on 2%, so let’s start with that. We have a ways to go, but the good news is that we have started.” ‘Things can get nasty’
A second senior European diplomat said Trump’s 4% suggestion was “not good,” highlighting concerns that the conflict over defense spending is fueling perceived cracks within NATO at a time when the alliance should be projecting strength — particularly ahead of the President’s upcoming summit with Putin.
“The summit should send a strong signal to Putin, and not show strong differences between allies. We would prefer a different situation,” a third senior European diplomat told CNN.
“But we’re not worried about it. We compare it to fights among families. Things can get nasty, but it’s still a family,” the diplomat added.
A senior NATO diplomatic source said that alliance countries agree there needs to be a push for more defense spending, but warned that the group should be showing greater unity ahead of Trump’s meeting with Putin.
But the source added that NATO unity is essential as well, saying it will only “increase the President’s negotiating leverage” with Putin. This NATO source suggested that Trump will go into his meeting with Putin with a stronger hand if the NATO alliance is also strong. CNN’s Manu Raju, Jeremy Diamond, Sophie Tatum and Jim Acosta contributed reporting

Read More…