Tsundoku: The art of buying books and never reading them – BBC News

Tsundoku: The art of buying books and never reading them – BBC News

End of Twitter post by @ellafsanders
Prof Andrew Gerstle teaches pre-modern Japanese texts at the University of London.
He explained to the BBC the term might be older than you think – it can be found in print as early as 1879, meaning it was likely in use before that.
The word “doku” can be used as a verb to mean “reading”. According to Prof Gerstle, the “tsun” in “tsundoku” originates in “tsumu” – a word meaning “to pile up”.
So when put together, “tsundoku” has the meaning of buying reading material and piling it up.
“The phrase ‘tsundoku sensei’ appears in text from 1879 according to the writer Mori Senzo,” Prof Gerstle explained. “Which is likely to be satirical, about a teacher who has lots of books but doesn’t read them.”
While this might sound like tsundoku is being used as an insult, Prof Gerstle said the word does not carry any stigma in Japan.

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Ahed Tamimi: Israel frees Palestinian viral slap video teen – BBC News

Ahed Tamimi, Palestinian viral slap video teenager, freed in Israel 29 July 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Ahed Tamimi is released from prison A Palestinian teenager who was filmed assaulting an Israeli soldier in the occupied West Bank has been freed after eight months in jail.
Video showing Ahed Tamimi slapping and kicking the soldier outside her home in Nabi Saleh last year went viral.
For Palestinians, she became a symbol of resistance to Israeli occupation, but many Israelis see her as a publicity-seeking troublemaker.
The 17-year-old was mobbed by well-wishers as she returned to her town.
“Resistance is continuing until the occupation is removed,” she told the crowd.
Speaking to the media later, she said she had resolved “to study law and to focus on holding the occupation accountable”.
Sixteen at the time, she was originally charged with 12 counts of assault, incitement, interference with soldiers and stone throwing.
In March, she agreed to plead guilty to four of the charges, including incitement and assault.
The day before Ahed Tamimi was released, two Italians were arrested for drawing a 4m (13ft) mural of the teenager’s face on the wall that separates Bethlehem from Jerusalem.
Israeli border police said the two Italian men, and a Palestinian who was also arrested, were suspected of “damaging and vandalising the security fence in the Bethlehem area”. Image copyright AFP Image caption The mural was created in the last week
The group then allegedly tried to flee when confronted by police.
Last Wednesday, one of the men identified himself as Italian street artist Jorit Agoch. He posted an appeal for help on his Instagram page on Saturday, saying he had been arrested. How did the incident go viral?
Ahed Tamimi was filmed by her mother, Nariman, shouting at and shoving two soldiers in the driveway of her family home on 15 December 2017.
The incident was streamed on Nariman Tamimi’s Facebook page and video of the confrontation was widely viewed.
In the footage she kicks one soldier and slaps his face, and threatens to punch the other. Image copyright AFP Image caption Both Ahed Tamimi (R) and her mother Nariman served time in jail over the incident
Ahed Tamimi told a pre-trial hearing that she had lashed out at the soldiers because she had seen them shoot her 15-year-old cousin Mohammed in the head with a rubber bullet that same day.
The Israeli military said it had dispatched the soldiers to the Tamimis’ home, where Palestinian youths had been throwing stones at troops sent to quell violent protests.
It also later contested the cause of Mohammed’s head injury , saying last month that the boy had told interrogators he sustained it from falling off a bike. What was the fallout?
Ahed Tamimi’s case sparked an outpouring of deeply opposing views between Israelis and Palestinians.
Many Israelis say Ahed Tamimi has long been exploited by her family, who they accuse of using her to try to provoke Israeli soldiers on film.
Her mother was also charged with incitement on social media and assault, while her cousin Nour, who participated in the incident, was charged with assault.
Israel’s Education Minister Naftali Bennett said Ahed and Nour Tamimi deserved to “finish their lives in prison”.
For Palestinians, Ahed Tamimi has become a national icon for what they see as acts of bravery in standing up to armed soldiers on occupied land.
Her face has appeared on street murals and posters, while an online petition organised by her father calling for her release gathered 1.7m signatures. Related Topics

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New York Times tells Trump: Don’t call reporters enemies of the people – BBC News

Report
He said he told Mr Trump that the phrase “fake news” was “untrue and harmful” but said he was “far more concerned about his labelling journalists ‘the enemy of the people'”.
“I warned that this inflammatory language is contributing to a rise in threats against journalists and will lead to violence,” he said.
Mr Sulzberger said he had told the president that this was particularly true in other countries, where he said Mr Trump’s rhetoric was being used by some regimes to crack down on journalists. Image copyright AFP Image caption The newspaper said it was not asking Mr Trump to stop criticising its coverage
“I warned that it was putting lives at risk, that it was undermining the democratic ideals of our nation, and that it was eroding one of our country’s greatest exports: a commitment to free speech and a free press,” he said.
The New York Times publisher said he was not asking Mr Trump not to criticise his newspaper if he was unhappy with its coverage but asking him to “reconsider his broader attacks on journalism”. When has Trump called journalists ‘enemies of the people’?
In February 2017 he tweeted that the New York Times as well as other outlets NBC, ABC, CNN and CBS were “the enemy of the American people”. He reportedly then used the phrase again during a conference the following week.

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Trump says he called media ‘enemy of the people’ in meeting with N.Y. Times publisher

by Philip Rucker July 29 at 3:48 PM Email the author BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — President Trump escalated his feud with the news media on Sunday, accusing journalists of being unpatriotic and endangering lives after the publisher of the New York Times disclosed that he had warned Trump recently that his inflammatory rhetoric about the media could lead to violence.
Trump — who has made “fake news” a rallying cry and labeled journalists the “enemy of the people” — fired off a Twitter tirade Sunday afternoon from his New Jersey golf estate blasting the media for revealing internal government deliberations and for what he considers unfairly negative coverage of his presidency.
“When the media — driven insane by their Trump Derangement Syndrome — reveals internal deliberations of our government, it truly puts the lives of many, not just journalists, at risk! Very unpatriotic!” Trump wrote.
The president went on to say, “I will not allow our great country to be sold out by anti-Trump haters in the dying newspaper industry,” singling out the Times and The Washington Post for writing “bad stories even on very positive achievements.”
Trump seems to have been responding to the lengthy statement issued earlier Sunday by Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger, who publicly detailed his July 20 meeting at the White House with the president.
Trump first characterized their discussion as “a very good and interesting meeting,” writing in a Sunday morning tweet that he and Sulzberger “spent much time talking about the vast amounts of Fake News being put out by the media & how that Fake News has morphed into phrase, ‘Enemy of the People.’”

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Jeremy Hunt makes ‘terrible’ gaffe about his wife in China | UK news

Jeremy Hunt , Britain’s new foreign secretary, has made an awkward debut in China when he sought to curry favour with his hosts by mentioning his Chinese wife, but accidentally referred to her as “Japanese”.
China and Japan have been traditional rivals for centuries. Although relations have improved somewhat recently, they remain touchy due to issues such as Japan’s bloody occupation of parts of China in the 1930s and 40s. Hunt, who was on his first official visit to China since taking over from Boris Johnson, quickly acknowledged the “terrible” error. “My wife is Japanese – my wife is Chinese. That’s a terrible mistake to make,” he told his counterpart, the Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi. “My wife is Chinese and my children are half-Chinese and so we have Chinese grandparents who live in Xi’an and strong family connections in China,” he added, referring to the ancient city of Xi’an in northern China. A former health minister, Hunt is married to Lucia Guo, with whom he has three children. He succeeds the gaffe-prone Johnson – who once referred to Africans as “flag-waving piccaninnies” with “watermelon smiles” in a newspaper column. Johnson dramatically resigned over Theresa May’s Brexit blueprint earlier this month. Hunt is in China in a bid to strengthen trade ties with Beijing ahead of Britain’s exit from the European Union next year. Other topics on the table are expected to be “the importance of multilateralism and free trade and ways the UK and China can work together on global challenges such as climate change, development, security and non-proliferation and enforcing UN sanctions on North Korea”, his office said ahead of the trip. • This article was amended on 31 July 2018 because an earlier version misspelled Xi’an as Xian.

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