Johnson to face inquiry over burka comments – BBC News

Johnson to face inquiry over burka comments – BBC News

Boris Johnson facing Tory investigation over burka comments 9 August 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Getty Images Boris Johnson is facing a possible investigation into breaches of the Conservative Party code of conduct.
The party has received dozens of complaints about the ex-foreign secretary’s comments about Muslim women wearing burkas.
The complaints will be looked at by an independent panel which could refer Mr Johnson to the party’s board, which has the power to expel him.
The party declined to comment on the details of the investigation.
A Conservative Party spokesman said: “The code of conduct process is strictly confidential.” A source close to Mr Johnson offered no comment.
Mr Johnson has rejected calls to apologise for saying people wearing burkas looked like “letter boxes” or “bank robbers”, in a Daily Telegraph column in which he also argued against a ban on full-face veils.
Critics have accused him of stoking Islamophobia to boost his Tory leadership ambitions but his supporters have said he was speaking up for “liberal values”.
It comes as a watchdog which advises ex-ministers on taking new jobs ruled that Mr Johnson broke ministerial rules by taking up his weekly column at the Telegraph without consulting it first. Why some Muslim women wear the veil
The Conservative Party has been accused of not doing enough to tackle anti-Muslim prejudice in its ranks, despite an initiative to boost tolerance and diversity.
The party’s code of conduct states that Tory officials and elected representatives must “lead by example to encourage and foster respect and tolerance” and not “use their position to bully, abuse, victimise, harass or unlawfully discriminate against others”.
The independent panel will decide whether to refer Mr Johnson to the party’s board. Possible action includes suspension of membership or expulsion from the party among other, lesser sanctions. Image copyright PA Image caption Cressida Dick: Johnson did not commit an offence
Conservative Party chairman Brandon Lewis and leader Theresa May have both called on Mr Johnson to apologise for his comments.
The founder of the Conservative Muslim Forum, Lord Sheikh, has written to Mr Lewis demanding “serious action”, while former attorney general Dominic Grieve said he would quit the party if Mr Johnson became prime minister.
A hundred Muslim women who wear the niqab or burka have signed a letter to Mr Lewis, calling on him to withdraw the Conservative whip from Mr Johnson and launch an independent inquiry into Islamophobia in the party.
“We are not forced to make these clothing choices, nor are we oppressed,” the women write in their letter, which has been issued to the media by the Muslim Council of Britain.
They say Mr Johnson’s words will “inflame tensions in a way that makes it easier for bigots to justify hate crimes against us”. ‘Legitimate debate’
Earlier, Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick said that while many have found Mr Johnson’s remarks offensive, officers had decided that he did not commit an offence.
She also confirmed that police have not received any criminal complaint against the former foreign secretary.
“I also know that many other people believe strongly that in the whole of the article, what Mr Johnson appears to have been attempting to do was to say that there shouldn’t be a ban and that he was engaging in a legitimate debate,” she added.
Asked what she made of the language used by the ex-cabinet minister, Ms Dick told the BBC Asian Network: “Some people have clearly found it offensive.
“I spoke last night to my very experienced officers who deal with hate crime and, although we have not yet received any allegation of such a crime, I can tell you that my preliminary view having spoken to them is that what Mr Johnson said would not reach the bar for a criminal offence. He did not commit a criminal offence.”
She added: “I am proud to police in a liberal democracy in which people have the right to express their opinions.
“What Mr Johnson said, if it is not criminal, is a matter for Mr Johnson and his friends and colleagues and indeed for the Conservative Party.”
The police and Crown Prosecution Service define a hate crime as “any criminal offence which is perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice, based on a person’s disability or perceived disability; race or perceived race; or religion or perceived religion; or sexual orientation or perceived sexual orientation or transgender identity or perceived transgender identity”. Related Topics

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Russia faces US action over Skripal attack – BBC News

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the measures were to counter “malicious actors” working to “increase Russia’s offensive cyber-capabilities”. Russia likely to resist
Analysis by Gary O’Donoghue, BBC News, Washington
After pressure from Republican members of Congress, the State Department has determined Moscow broke international law by using a military grade chemical weapon on the Skripals.
While the US expelled some five dozen diplomats shortly after the poisoning, the administration stopped short of making a formal determination that Russia had broken international law.
But Congress has been pushing for such a decision and now the state department has confirmed Russia’s actions contravened 1991 US legislation on the use of chemical weapons. That breach automatically triggers the imposition of sanctions and places requirements on Russia to avert further restrictions in three months’ time.
Those requirements could include opening up sites in Russia for inspection – a move Moscow would probably resist.
So far President Donald Trump has been silent on this latest move – which could well derail his attempts to develop a new, warmer relationship with Vladimir Putin. What was the nerve agent?
Following the incident, the British government said the military-grade nerve agent Novichok, of a type developed by Russia, had been used in the attack. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Laura Foster explains how the Novichok nerve agent works
Relations between Russia and the West hit a new low. More than 20 countries expelled Russian envoys in solidarity with the UK, including the US. Washington ordered 60 diplomats to leave and closed the Russian consulate general in Seattle.
Three months after the Salisbury attack, two other people fell ill at a house in Amesbury, about eight miles from the city. Dawn Sturgess later died while her partner, Charlie Rowley, spent three weeks recovering in hospital.
After tests, scientists at the UK’s military research lab, Porton Down, found the couple had also been exposed to Novichok.
Mr Rowley told ITV News he had earlier found a sealed bottle of perfume and given it to Ms Sturgess, who sprayed the substance on her wrists. Related Topics

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Yemen war: ‘Children killed’ in bus attack – BBC News

The vehicle was stationary when the attack happened, it added. Image copyright Reuters Image caption The ICRC said it was sending extra supplies to help hospitals deal with the influx
The ICRC said a hospital it supported in Saada had received the bodies of 29 children , all of them under the age of 15, and 48 injured people, among them 30 children.
It sent additional supplies to the hospital to cope with the influx of patients.
Houthi-run Al-Masirah TV reported that 47 people were killed and 77 wounded, and broadcast graphic pictures showing the bodies of several young children, some of them wearing school uniform. What has been the reaction?
Houthi spokesman Mohammed Abdul-Salam accused the coalition of showing “clear disregard for civilian life” by targeting a crowded public place. Skip Twitter post by @RMardiniICRC It is high time for these relapsing tragedies to stop in #Yemen . No one should allow putting children in harm’s way and making them pay such an unacceptable price. Proud of @ICRC_ye and #Yemeni health teams in Saada doing their utmost to save lives. https://t.co/Tx9WW3Y5Kg Report End of Twitter post by @RMardiniICRC
The ICRC stressed that “under international humanitarian law, civilians must be protected during conflict”, while the secretary-general of the Norwegian Refugee Council Jan Egeland called it a “grotesque, shameful” attack that showed “blatant disregard for rules of war”.
Save the Children described the incident as “horrific”, and called for a full, immediate and independent investigation into recent attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure.
It was not immediately clear whether the bus was the target of the air strike, but coalition spokesman Col Turki al-Malki said the attack was “a legitimate military action , conducted in conformity with international humanitarian law”. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Air strikes were reported in the rebel-held capital of Sanaa later on Thursday
He said it had hit “militants responsible for planning and targeting civilians” in the southern Saudi city of Jizan on Wednesday night, where one Yemeni resident was killed and 11 others were injured by fragments from an intercepted ballistic missile that was launched by the Houthis from neighbouring Amran province.
He accused the rebels of using children as “tools and covers for their terrorist acts”.
Later, air strikes were reported in the rebel-held Yemeni capital, Sanaa.
A week ago, at least 55 civilians were killed and 170 others wounded in a series of attacks on the rebel-held Red Sea port city of Hudaydah. The coalition denied that it had carried out air strikes in the area, and blamed the deaths on rebel mortar fire. Why is there a war in Yemen?
Yemen has been devastated by a conflict that escalated in early 2015, when the Houthis seized control of much of the west of the country and forced President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi to flee abroad. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The conflict in Yemen has been raging for years – but what is it all about?
Alarmed by the rise of a group they saw as an Iranian proxy, the UAE, Saudi Arabia and seven other Arab states intervened in an attempt to restore the government.
Almost 10,000 people – two-thirds of them civilians – have been killed and 55,000 others injured in the fighting, according to the United Nations.
The fighting and a partial blockade by the coalition has also left 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid, created the world’s largest food security emergency, and led to a cholera outbreak that is thought to have affected a million people. Related Topics

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Portland, Maine Is the 2018 Restaurant City of the Year – Bon Appetit « Portland Talks

Portland , Maine Is the 2018 Restaurant City of the Year Bon Appetit Full disclosure: I’ve got a thing for Maine . I went to college there, I got married there, I regularly vacation there. And I’ve always believed that Portland has one of the more vibrant, compelling food scenes, thanks in no small part to all that …
August 7th, 2018 | Tags: google , Maine , news , portland | Category: Google News Leave a Reply

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Dead baby found in American Airlines plane at LaGuardia – NY Daily News

Dead baby found in toilet on American Airlines plane at LaGuardia By Thomas Tracy and and Graham Rayman Aug 07, 2018 | 10:55 AM Port Authority police are investigating the discovery of a dead baby in a toilet on this American Airlines plane (no credit) Workers found a dead baby in a toilet on a plane at LaGuardia Airport early Tuesday, officials and sources said.
The infant, believed to be about 6 months old, was found about 6 a.m. in a toilet on American Airlines flight 1942 out of Charlotte, N.C., sources said. Advertisement
The Airbus A321 was just outside a hanger at the time of the discovery, the sources said. The plane had arrived at LaGuardia at 10:44 p.m. Monday.
Port Authority police and Queens prosecutors are investigating.
The plane was not scheduled to depart LaGuardia again until Wednesday morning, records show.
The city Medical Examiner transported the baby to the Queens morgue, sources said. Advertisement

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