Yemen war: 'Children killed' in bus attack – BBC News

Yemen war: ‘Children killed’ in bus attack – BBC News

The vehicle was stationary when the attack happened, it added. Image copyright Reuters Image caption The ICRC said it was sending extra supplies to help hospitals deal with the influx
The ICRC said a hospital it supported in Saada had received the bodies of 29 children , all of them under the age of 15, and 48 injured people, among them 30 children.
It sent additional supplies to the hospital to cope with the influx of patients.
Houthi-run Al-Masirah TV reported that 47 people were killed and 77 wounded, and broadcast graphic pictures showing the bodies of several young children, some of them wearing school uniform. What has been the reaction?
Houthi spokesman Mohammed Abdul-Salam accused the coalition of showing “clear disregard for civilian life” by targeting a crowded public place. Skip Twitter post by @RMardiniICRC It is high time for these relapsing tragedies to stop in #Yemen . No one should allow putting children in harm’s way and making them pay such an unacceptable price. Proud of @ICRC_ye and #Yemeni health teams in Saada doing their utmost to save lives. https://t.co/Tx9WW3Y5Kg Report End of Twitter post by @RMardiniICRC
The ICRC stressed that “under international humanitarian law, civilians must be protected during conflict”, while the secretary-general of the Norwegian Refugee Council Jan Egeland called it a “grotesque, shameful” attack that showed “blatant disregard for rules of war”.
Save the Children described the incident as “horrific”, and called for a full, immediate and independent investigation into recent attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure.
It was not immediately clear whether the bus was the target of the air strike, but coalition spokesman Col Turki al-Malki said the attack was “a legitimate military action , conducted in conformity with international humanitarian law”. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Air strikes were reported in the rebel-held capital of Sanaa later on Thursday
He said it had hit “militants responsible for planning and targeting civilians” in the southern Saudi city of Jizan on Wednesday night, where one Yemeni resident was killed and 11 others were injured by fragments from an intercepted ballistic missile that was launched by the Houthis from neighbouring Amran province.
He accused the rebels of using children as “tools and covers for their terrorist acts”.
Later, air strikes were reported in the rebel-held Yemeni capital, Sanaa.
A week ago, at least 55 civilians were killed and 170 others wounded in a series of attacks on the rebel-held Red Sea port city of Hudaydah. The coalition denied that it had carried out air strikes in the area, and blamed the deaths on rebel mortar fire. Why is there a war in Yemen?
Yemen has been devastated by a conflict that escalated in early 2015, when the Houthis seized control of much of the west of the country and forced President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi to flee abroad. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The conflict in Yemen has been raging for years – but what is it all about?
Alarmed by the rise of a group they saw as an Iranian proxy, the UAE, Saudi Arabia and seven other Arab states intervened in an attempt to restore the government.
Almost 10,000 people – two-thirds of them civilians – have been killed and 55,000 others injured in the fighting, according to the United Nations.
The fighting and a partial blockade by the coalition has also left 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid, created the world’s largest food security emergency, and led to a cholera outbreak that is thought to have affected a million people. Related Topics

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Regular exercise ‘best for mental health’ – BBC News

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption All types of exercises were found to improve mental health no matter people’s age or gender Regular physical activity lasting 45 minutes three to five times a week can reduce poor mental health – but doing more than that is not always beneficial, a large US study suggests.
A total of 1.2 million people reported their activity levels for a month and rated their mental wellbeing.
People who exercised had 1.5 fewer “bad days” a month than non-exercisers, the study found.
Team sports, cycling and aerobics had the greatest positive impact.
All types of activity were found to improve mental health no matter people’s age or gender, including doing the housework and looking after the children.
The study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry Journal, is the largest of its kind to date but it cannot confirm that physical activity is the cause of improved mental health.
Depression, anxiety, OCD – running helped us beat them Caring for a child with mental health issues Poor mental health ‘part and parcel of childhood’ Mental health: Children failed at vulnerable point Previous research into the effects of exercise on mental health have thrown up mixed results, and some studies suggest that lack of activity could lead to poor mental health as well as being a symptom of it.
Exercise is already known to reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
Adults taking part in the study said they experienced on average 3.4 days of poor mental health each month. For those who were physically active, this reduced to only two days.
Among people who had been diagnosed previously with depression, exercise appeared to have a larger effect, resulting in seven days of poor mental health a month compared with nearly 11 days for those who did no exercise.
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Being involved in team sport could be good for resilience and reduce isolation How often and for how long people were active was also important.
Being active for 30 to 60 minutes every second day came out as the optimal routine.
But there could be such a thing as doing too much exercise, the study concluded.
Dr Adam Chekroud, study author and assistant professor of psychiatry at Yale University, said: “Previously, people have believed that the more exercise you do, the better your mental health, but our study suggests that this is not the case.
“Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90-minute sessions is associated with worse mental health.”
He said the positive impact of team sports suggested that social sports activities could reduce isolation and be good for resilience, while also reducing depression.
Complicated link The findings back up government guidelines recommending that people should do 150 minutes of physical activity per week.
But the study has some limitations. It is based on self-reporting, which is not always accurate, and there is no way of measuring physical activity.
Dr Dean Burnett, neuroscientist and honorary research associate, from the school of psychology at Cardiff University, said the link between exercise and mental health had been difficult to pin down but this large study “strongly suggests that there is a definite association between the two”.
“However, the nature of the study means it’s difficult to say more than that with any real certainty,” he said.
Prof Stephen Lawrie, head of psychiatry at the University of Edinburgh, said it indicated that social and “mindful” exercise is particularly good for mental health – but not if it is overdone.
“I suspect we all know people who seem ‘addicted’ to exercise and if this starts to impact on other aspects of life – like foregoing social activities because one has to be up at the crack of dawn to run several miles – it might actually be bad for people,” he added.
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Philip Riteman, Holocaust survivor, dead at 96 | CBC News

Holocaust survivor Philip Riteman died in his sleep at his home in Halifax Wednesday morning, his family has confirmed. He was 96.
Riteman survived the concentration camps at Auschwitz and Dachau and he spoke about what he endured during the Holocaust with thousands of students, reporters, business associations and community groups for more than 20 years.
“He came through hell and really showed that people can rise above and live a more compassionate and fuller life than most people ever live in their lives. That’s the real legacy,” said Larry Riteman, Philip’s son.
Survivor with a message Many people across Nova Scotia would have remembered Riteman visiting their school or organization to share his story. One of the most moving parts of his presentation was when he showed his prison tattoo number: 98706.
Philip Riteman grew up in Poland. When he was a teenager, his Jewish family was captured by the German government and sent to Auschwitz. His parents and his seven brothers and sisters were among the millions of people killed in the Holocaust.
He emigrated to Newfoundland and Labrador in 1946 and did not speak about his experience in the concentration camps for 40 years.
Reliving the terror Larry Riteman said his father started talking about what happened to him in the 1980s, when Holocaust deniers started making the news.
“The [Ernst] Zündel trial, Malcolm Ross and all that sort of thing. And that was when he really felt he had to start telling people what had happened,” Riteman said.
“Because there was a lot of people that were insinuating that the Germans weren’t that bad or that the Holocaust was greatly exaggerated or it didn’t happen at all.
“And he knew he had to counter that. So he got out and he told people what he endured. And he relived it every time he told it … it was clear he had seen something absolutely awful. Most people have no grasp,” Riteman said.
Holocaust survivor Philip Riteman honoured by adopted home of N.L. Holocaust survivor Philip Riteman speaks about Auschwitz ‘It is better to love than to hate’ Riteman’s story was shared in the biography, Millions of Souls: The Philip Riteman Story.
He shared his story for two reasons: to make sure the Holocaust and its victims were remembered and to prevent it from happening again.
Riteman’s wife Dorothy, whom he was married to for 68 years, said his message was simple: “It is better to love than to hate.”
Host Amy Smith speaks with holocaust survivor Philip Riteman about his internment in a concentration camp and why he shares his experience with students today. 22:25 Larry Riteman said his father’s health was in decline for weeks. He said the family is spending time together.
“That he lasted as long as he did was more a tribute to his strength than anything else,” Riteman said.
On Thursday, Premier Stephen McNeil said Riteman was a “tremendous educator” who “taught us all about humanity, the good and the bad.”
“He was challenging all of us to ensure that we become the voice to our children and to the next generation of our province and country and world that evil lurks around us,” McNeil said. “And we need to be vigilant to ensure that it doesn’t happen.”
A funeral will be held Thursday at Cruikshank’s Halifax Funeral Home at 2 p.m.
CBC’s Journalistic Standards and Practices Report Typo or Error

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Johnson to face inquiry over burka comments – BBC News

Johnson to face inquiry over burka comments 9 August 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Ex-UK foreign secretary Boris Johnson to be investigated by panel after complaints to Tory party over burka comments
This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version.
You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts.

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Regular exercise ‘best for mental health’ – BBC News

Regular exercise ‘best for mental health’ 9 August 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Getty Images Image caption All types of exercises were found to improve mental health no matter people’s age or gender Regular physical activity lasting 45 minutes three to five times a week can reduce poor mental health – but doing more than that is not always beneficial, a large US study suggests.
A total of 1.2 million people reported their activity levels for a month and rated their mental wellbeing.
People who exercised had 1.5 fewer “bad days” a month than non-exercisers, the study found.
Team sports, cycling and aerobics had the greatest positive impact.
All types of activity were found to improve mental health no matter people’s age or gender, including doing the housework and looking after the children.
The study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry Journal, is the largest of its kind to date but it cannot confirm that physical activity is the cause of improved mental health.
Previous research into the effects of exercise on mental health have thrown up mixed results, and some studies suggest that lack of activity could lead to poor mental health as well as being a symptom of it.
Exercise is already known to reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
Adults taking part in the study said they experienced on average 3.4 days of poor mental health each month. For those who were physically active, this reduced to only two days.
Among people who had been diagnosed previously with depression, exercise appeared to have a larger effect, resulting in seven days of poor mental health a month compared with nearly 11 days for those who did no exercise. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Being involved in team sport could be good for resilience and reduce isolation
How often and for how long people were active was also important.
Being active for 30 to 60 minutes every second day came out as the optimal routine.
But there could be such a thing as doing too much exercise, the study concluded.
Dr Adam Chekroud, study author and assistant professor of psychiatry at Yale University, said: “Previously, people have believed that the more exercise you do, the better your mental health, but our study suggests that this is not the case.
“Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90-minute sessions is associated with worse mental health.”
He said the positive impact of team sports suggested that social sports activities could reduce isolation and be good for resilience, while also reducing depression. Complicated link
The findings back up government guidelines recommending that people should do 150 minutes of physical activity per week.
But the study has some limitations. It is based on self-reporting, which is not always accurate, and there is no way of measuring physical activity.
Dr Dean Burnett, neuroscientist and honorary research associate, from the school of psychology at Cardiff University, said the link between exercise and mental health had been difficult to pin down but this large study “strongly suggests that there is a definite association between the two”.
“However, the nature of the study means it’s difficult to say more than that with any real certainty,” he said.
Prof Stephen Lawrie, head of psychiatry at the University of Edinburgh, said it indicated that social and “mindful” exercise is particularly good for mental health – but not if it is overdone.
“I suspect we all know people who seem ‘addicted’ to exercise and if this starts to impact on other aspects of life – like foregoing social activities because one has to be up at the crack of dawn to run several miles – it might actually be bad for people,” he added. Related Topics

Read More…