Yorkdale mall locked down after reported shooting News

Yorkdale mall locked down after reported shooting News

Toronto’s Yorkdale Shopping Centre was locked down after gunfire rang out at the popular north-end mall Thursday afternoon.
Police received “a number of 911 calls” shortly before 3 p.m. ET Thursday reporting a shooting, Supt. Rob Johnson told reporters at the scene Thursday evening.
Investigators have determined that an altercation broke out between two groups of men in the southeast corner of the mall, he said. At one point, one of the men pulled out a gun and fired at least two shots.
The men fled the scene, he said. Earlier, police tweeted that they were seeking two men in their 20s, one of whom may be carrying a handgun.
Mall closed for the day “We are in the process of interviewing witnesses and looking for evidence,” Johnson said.
No one was injured as a result of the gunfire, he said. However, two people were treated for minor injuries trying to flee, he said.
Earlier, paramedics said they transported one person to hospital for a medical issue unrelated to gunfire.
The mall tweeted that it would be closed until Friday morning.
“Yorkdale is secure and we are co-operating with police to safely evacuate the centre,” the mall said. “We expect to open as scheduled tomorrow morning at 10 a.m.”
Johnson said officers helped employees get back into the mall to retrieve their belongings, and help managers lock up their stores for the night.
Police are helping patrons leave the mall and are not letting anyone in. The mall will be closed for the rest of the day. (Paul Borkwood/CBC) CBC News videographer Mary Webster was in the mall when she heard a loud bang, followed by a second. Patrons huddled in the back of the Roots store while someone set off an emergency alarm.
“People were crying,” Webster reported from the scene.
Mall staff asked patrons to file into a hallway and then escorted them out through an underground parking lot, she said. Some patrons left all of their belongings behind.
‘Was just a lot of chaos’ Alexis Uiga and her daughter Samantha were having coffee together in the mall when they heard the shots.
“We thought it was a balloon or something popping, it just didn’t register what it was,” Uiga told CBC News.
Once they heard another shot they realized what was happening and hid under a ledge, she said.
@CP24 @CBCToronto moment shooting at yorkdale mall happened inside Tesla. pic.twitter.com/E2TJywS9Kn
— @ShaunWinston “I had a little girl who got separated from who she was here with and she was just clenched on to me and another woman and her son were falling over me,” Alexis said about the scramble to take cover.
“It was just a lot of chaos then everything just went quiet and that was it.”
Alexis said all that was going through her mind was to protect her daughter and the strangers around her.
“I can’t describe it. I never thought I’d have been in the middle of a shooting,” she said, adding all you can really do is “take cover, be quiet and just hope that you can get through it and get back home to your loved ones.”
Alexis Uiga and daughter Samantha were having coffee in the mall when they heard gunshots. (Paul Borkwood/CBC ) Another mall patron, Connie Chen, said she was “really terrified” when she heard two shots.
“It was like a firecracker,” she told CBC Toronto. “We saw people running and we started to run. The first sound was really loud.”
Natasha Narine, an employee at the MAC cosmetic store, said the mall was “very crowded” because it’s the last week before school “and everybody is back to school shopping.”
Police have cordoned off the mall entrances and are evacuating the building. (Mary Webster/CBC) In a statement, Mayor John Tory said “people should not have to worry about gun violence,” no matter where they are in the city.
“There are too many guns available to criminals in the city and I am determined to end that with the help of our police and our government partners,” he said. “I am relieved that there are no reports of injuries from gunfire and I hope that remains true.”
CBC’s Journalistic Standards and Practices Report Typo or Error

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Clock changes: EU backs ending daylight saving – News

Image copyright Getty Images The EU Commission is proposing to end the practice of adjusting clocks by an hour in spring and autumn after a survey found most Europeans opposed it.
Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said millions “believe that in future, summer time should be year-round, and that’s what will happen”.
The Commission’s proposal requires support from the 28 national governments and MEPs to become law.
In the EU clocks switch between winter and summer under daylight saving time.
A European Parliament resolution says it is “crucial to maintain a unified EU time regime”.
However, the Commission has not yet drafted details of the proposed change.
In a consultation paper it said one option would be to let each member state decide whether to go for permanent summer or winter time. That would be “a sovereign decision of each member state”, Commission spokesman Alexander Winterstein explained on Friday.
He stressed that the proposal was “to no longer constrain member states into changing clocks twice per year”.
The UK is one of the 28 nations, but is due to leave the European Union in March 2019. Any change would be unlikely to happen before then.
Mr Winterstein rejected a suggestion the proposal could cause particular difficulties in Ireland: “I don’t see the link between our quest which is undiminished, to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland, and our proposal, which will come in due course, to no longer constrain member states into changing clocks twice per year.
“One pertains to the internal market once adopted, the other initiative is to ensure the Good Friday Agreement and other safeguards remain in place.”
The Commission warns that unco-ordinated time changes between member states would cause economic harm.
In the public consultation , 84% of 4.6 million respondents called for ending the spring and autumn clock change.
By far the biggest response was in Germany and Austria (3.79% and 2.94% of the national population respectively). The UK’s response was lowest – 0.02% – but few Italians took part, either (0.04%).
Read more on the world’s time controversies: Changing clocks: a waste of time? How time zones confused the world How do countries swap time zones? Why daylight saving time riles the US Why do many dislike Europe’s daylight saving time? Some studies cited by the Commission point to adverse health impacts from the clock changes.
“Findings suggest that the effect on the human biorhythm may be more severe than previously thought,” it says.
Clocks go forward by an hour on the last Sunday in March and switch back to winter time on the last Sunday in October.
Finland called for daylight saving to be abolished EU-wide, after a petition gathered more than 70,000 signatures from citizens calling for such a change.
The EU made the spring/autumn clock change the rule in all member states in 1996, based on the argument that it would reduce energy costs. But the Commission says the data on energy-saving is inconclusive.
There is also no reliable evidence that the clock changes reduce traffic accidents, the Commission says.
What are the EU’s current time zones? There are three standard time zones:
Three states apply GMT (the UK, Ireland and Portugal) 17 have Central European Time, which is GMT+1 Eight have Eastern European Time, which is GMT+2 The current seasonal clock changes are controversial partly because there is a big difference in daylight hours experienced by Scandinavia and by southern Europe.
Nordic countries have long, dark nights in winter and short nights in summer. The pattern in the south is more even across the seasons.
There are anomalies too. For example, neighbours Portugal and Spain are in different time zones, as are Sweden and Finland.

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New York renamed ‘Jewtropolis’ in map hack – BBC News

New York renamed ‘Jewtropolis’ in map hack 30 August 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Screenshot Image caption The renaming of New York City was an act of vandalism, said Snapchat, which is investigating the matter New York City was briefly renamed “Jewtropolis” in mapping software used by social media site Snapchat and others.
The company called it an act of “vandalism” and said it worked with its partner Mapbox to “get this fixed immediately”.
In a statement, Snap said the defacement was “deeply offensive”.
Mapbox called it an act of “hate speech” but added that the issue had been resolved “within an hour”.
“Our team deleted and removed that information,” the firm said in a blogpost .
It added that the “malicious edit” was made by an unnamed source that attempted “several other hateful edits” which were not successful.
The firm explained that its AI system flags more than 7,000 map changes a day, which are sent for human review.
A “human error” in the manual part of the review process led to the incident, it explained. Snapchat apology
Screenshots on social media showed that other apps had also been affected.
Snap Map allows users to discover content in specific locations, including sporting events and news.
A screenshot of the vandalised map was shared with the Snapchat Support Twitter account.
And Snap thanked the user who had shared it for alerting it to the problem.
In a statement, Snap told BBC News: “Snap Map, similar to other apps, relies on third-party mapping data from OpenStreetMap, which has been subject to vandalism.
“This defacement is deeply offensive and entirely contrary to our values. And we want to apologise to any members of our community who saw it.”
OpenStreetMap has also issued a statement condemning the edit.
It said the act had been carried out a month ago, but there had been a delay in processing the data involved, which had prevented the public from seeing the offensive phrase until now.
“There is ongoing work within the OpenStreetMap community to develop better quality assurance tools, to detect and deal with this sort of issue faster,” it said.
“Unfortunately human error in their processing pipeline led to this incident.” Related Topics

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Anti-Semitism row: Frank Field resigns Labour whip – BBC News

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Field: We must deal with ‘local Labour thuggery’ Veteran Labour MP Frank Field has quit the party’s group in Parliament, saying the leadership is becoming “a force for anti-Semitism in British politics”.
The Birkenhead MP also blamed a “culture of intolerance, nastiness and intimidation” in local parties.
A month ago he lost a confidence vote in his constituency party, after siding with the government in Brexit votes.
Jeremy Corbyn has apologised for hurt caused by anti-Semitism in the party and pledged to stamp it out.
A Labour Party spokesman said: “Jeremy Corbyn thanks Frank Field for his service to the Labour Party.”
But a Labour source claimed “Frank has been looking for an excuse to resign for some time.” A guide to Labour Party anti-Semitism claims
Mr Field, a Eurosceptic who is among a handful of Labour MPs to back the government in some Brexit votes, says he will remain as a member of the party, but will quit the Labour whip in Parliament – which means he will not be subject to the parliamentary party’s disciplinary procedures.
The Labour Party says it is not possible to resign the whip and remain a party member, but Mr Field told BBC Radio 4’s PM he hoped to stand as a Labour candidate at the next election, but would otherwise stand as an independent Labour candidate. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Birkenhead voters react to local MP Frank Field’s decision to resign the Labour whip
In a letter to chief whip Nick Brown, he said the anti-Semitism row in the party was reason enough to resign, suggesting the leadership was “becoming a force for anti-Semitism in British politics”.
“The leadership is doing nothing substantive to address this erosion of our core values. It saddens me that we are increasingly seen as a racist party.”
Mr Field has been a Labour MP since 1979 and is a specialist on welfare issues. He had a spell as welfare reform minister after Tony Blair became prime minister in 1997, but his brief to “think the unthinkable” ended with his resignation a year later.
Since then he has been a backbencher, and has chaired the Commons Work and Pensions Committee for the past three years. Image caption Mr Field said he expected Jeremy Corbyn to lead the party into the next election Analysis, by John Pienaar, BBC deputy political editor
Perhaps the biggest question raised by Frank Field’s resignation from Labour’s group at Westminster is: Will there be more?
Could this even be the beginning of a much wider schism, taking some of the significant minority of Labour MPs who oppose Jeremy Corbyn, not just over the issue of anti-Semitism but wider political issues including Europe, over the edge?
The stresses and strains in the party over anti-Semitism, over Europe and in particular the idea of a fresh referendum – a so-called People’s Vote – on Brexit will dominate Labour’s annual conference in Liverpool in late September.
Talk of a new centrist grouping in politics has been rumbling for months. But those dissident MPs have, so far, been deeply reluctant to translate their private dissent into open insurrection.
They say it’s about deep-rooted loyalty. Their enemies say it’s a lack of nerve. Both loyalty and nerve will be tested in the coming days and weeks.
Last month, Mr Field lost a confidence vote by his constituency party after voting with the government over Brexit plans.
In his letter to Nick Brown, Mr Field complained that intimidation and intolerance were now “sadly manifest within my own Constituency Labour Party” and referred to a complaint he had made “on a specific bullying issue” going back 18 months that, he said, “no decisive action” had been taken on.
He said he intended to remain MP for Birkenhead, as an independent Labour MP, adding: “Few events would give me greater pleasure than to apply to the Parliamentary Labour Party for the whip.
“But great changes in the leadership’s stance on the issues outlined in this letter will need to take place before I will be able to do so.” Jeremy Corbyn apologises for hurt caused by anti-Semitism
Later he told BBC News that his decision was intended as a “wake-up call to the Labour Party” and he had not spoken to other Labour MPs about it: “It is not part of a wider plot, Jeremy will see us into the next election.”
Asked if he was “jumping before being pushed” following the confidence vote, he replied: “No, they’re 30-odd people who voted against me… the idea that 30-odd people could decide the fate of what will be the choice that Labour Party voters get next time is absurd.”
Labour’s deputy leader Tom Watson described Mr Field’s resignation as a “serious loss to the party” which “reflects both the deep divisions in the party and the sense of drift engulfing us”.
He added: “It is a major wake up call. We cannot afford to lose people of such weight and stature.”
But backbench Labour MP Chris Williamson told BBC Newsnight: “He’s obviously lost the confidence of his members and he’s now getting his excuses in, it seems to me, and throwing around grotesque slurs that have no basis in reality – and that is a very regrettable end to Frank’s long career in the House of Commons.”
And Labour’s Shadow Justice Secretary Richard Burgon said Mr Field should face a by-election. He tweeted: Skip Twitter post by @RichardBurgon Politicians who are elected as Labour MPs by their constituents and who then leave the Labour Party should do the right and respectful thing and call a by-election straight away. They should ask for their constituents’ consent to continue to represent them on a different basis. Report End of Twitter post by @RichardBurgon
Former Conservative Party chairman Lord Pickles was among Conservatives who praised Mr Field, writing on Twitter: “Massive blow to Labour. Well respected in Parliament and by the public.”
Labour has been dealing with a row about the extent of anti-Semitism within the party for more than two years.
A 2016 inquiry, carried out by Shami Chakrabarti, concluded that while the Labour Party was not overrun by anti-Semitism, there was an “occasionally toxic atmosphere”.
Recently, the focus has been on a new code of conduct the party has adopted on anti-Semitism, with critics concerned that it does not go as far as the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s guidelines.
Earlier this month, Mr Corbyn again apologised for hurt caused to Jewish people by anti-Semitism in his party and admitted Labour had been too slow in dealing with disciplinary cases.
Mr Corbyn also stressed that people who hold anti-Semitic views “have no place in the Labour Party” and said people who use “anti-Semitic poison” are not his supporters, nor do they speak for him or the party. Related Topics

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