Indonesia quake death toll 'at least 832' – BBC News

Indonesia quake death toll ‘at least 832’ – BBC News

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption It is feared many people remain trapped in collapsed buildings At least 832 people were killed in the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, the national disaster agency says.
Many people were reported trapped in the rubble of buildings that collapsed in Friday’s 7.5-magnitude earthquake, agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho told a news conference.
The quake triggered tsunami waves as high as 6m (20ft), he added.
Vice-President Jusuf Kalla said the final death toll could be thousands.
Rescuers have been digging by hand in the search for survivors in the city of Palu.
“What we now desperately need is heavy machinery to clear the rubble. I have my staff on the ground, but it’s impossible just to rely on their strength alone to clear this,” Muhammad Syaugi, head of the national search-and-rescue agency, told AFP news agency.
There have also been concerns about the town of Donggala, where the impact is still unclear.
The Red Cross estimates that more than 1.6 million people have been affected by the earthquake and tsunami which it described as a tragedy that “could get much worse”.
Strong aftershocks have continued to hit the island since Friday’s earthquake.
President Joko Widodo visited Palu to view sites affected by the disaster, including Talise Beach – the main tourist area that was badly affected by the tsunami.
“I know there are many problems that need to be solved in a short time, including communications,” he said. What is the situation in Palu?
Many remain missing in the city of 335,000, some thought to be trapped in the debris of collapsed buildings.
Rescue teams dug by hand to free 24 people trapped in the rubble of the Roa-Roa hotel in the city of Palu, but there are fears that dozens more remain trapped. Image copyright EPA Image caption The tsunami left a trail of destruction
Bodies have been lying in city streets and the injured are being treated in tents because of damage to hospitals.
Anxious survivors in Palu bedded down in the open air on Saturday night, heeding advice by officials not to return to their homes as a precaution.
“It feels very tense,” Risa Kusuma, who was with her feverish baby boy at an evacuation centre, told AFP.
“Every minute an ambulance brings in bodies. Clean water is scarce. The minimarkets are looted everywhere.” ‘Supplies running out’
By Rebecca Henschke, in Poso
In Poso, a four-hour drive from Palu, supplies are running out. State-owned petrol stations have closed as they have run dry. People are queuing up at roadside stalls, buying petrol in bottles to take into the affected area and to find missing loved ones. Supermarkets have limited food left and it is difficult to find bottled water.
Ermi Liana, who is travelling with our BBC team, doesn’t know if her parents are alive. “They live close to a bridge that collapsed. I can’t reach them by phone,” she says. “I can only pray they are alive.”
We haven’t seen any aid heading in and there is still no communication link to the town of Donggala. Why were so many killed on Friday?
The 7.5 magnitude quake occurred at a shallow depth of 10km (6.2 miles) just off the central island of Sulawesi at 18:03 (10:03 GMT), triggering a tsunami, US monitors say.
Many people were on the beach in Palu, preparing for a festival, and were caught when waves swept in.
Video shows people screaming and fleeing in panic.
As well as destroying homes, the quake wrecked a shopping centre, a mosque, a hotel and a road bridge.
An air traffic controller at Palu airport died ensuring a plane took off safely after the quake. What do survivors say? Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The moment the tsunami hit
When the quake hit, “we all panicked and ran out of the house,” Anser Bachmid, 39, told AFP news agency. “People here need aid – food, drink, clean water. We don’t know what to eat for dinner tonight.”
“I just ran when I saw the waves hitting homes on the coastline,” Palu resident Rusidanto said.
Dwi Haris, who was in the city for a wedding, was staying in a hotel with his wife and daughter when the quake struck.
“There was no time to save ourselves,” he told the Associated Press news agency. “I was squeezed into the ruins of the wall… I heard my wife cry for help but then silence. I don’t know what happened to her and my child. I hope they are safe.”
With back and shoulder injuries, he is being treated outdoors at Palu’s Army Hospital. What is being done to help?
Aid is being flown from the capital Jakarta into Palu airport, using the part of its runway still intact.
Patients are being treated in the open outside city hospitals and at least one military field hospital has been erected.
The regional head of the Indonesian Doctors Association (IDI), Komang, asked the authorities for immediate help.
“We need tents, medicines, medical personnel, tarpaulins, blankets and more of other things,” he said.
The UK-based charity Save the Children is sending an assessment team to the disaster zone.
“Unfortunately the more information that we’re getting, the worse the situation appears to be,” charity spokesman Tom Howells told the BBC from Jakarta.
Have you been affected by the earthquake? If it is safe to do so, share your experience by emailing
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Jefferson Airplane’s Marty Balin dies aged 76 – BBC News

Jefferson Airplane’s Marty Balin dies aged 76 29 September 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright WireImage Image caption Marty Balin was inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996 Marty Balin – the co-founder and vocalist-guitarist of the psychedelic rock band Jefferson Airplane – has died aged 76, his family and publicist say.
They did not specify the cause of death of the US musician.
Balin, real name Martyn Jerel Buchwal, found fame with the group in the 1960s with hits such as White Rabbit.
He left the San Francisco-based band in 1970 – but later got back together with some of its members under the name Jefferson Starship.
He was inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Marty Balin co-founded Jefferson Airplane in 1965
In Friday’s statement, Marty Balin’s family said: “Marty’s fans describe him as having had a substantial impact for the better of the world: ‘One of the greatest voices of all time, a writer of songs that will never fade, and founder of the quintessential San Francisco band of the sixties.’
“His music is known for being the soundtrack to all of life’s monumental moments.”
Jefferson Airplane formed in 1965 when folk artist Balin decided to create a rock group in response to the Beatles-led British Invasion.
The band quickly attracted a local following – and when fledgling promoter Bill Graham opened his legendary Fillmore Auditorium, Jefferson Airplane served as the first headliner.
Signed to RCA Records for the then-princely sum of $25,000, the band scored five gold albums in the US, including 1967’s Surrealistic Pillow and 1968’s Crown of Creation in their first run of success.
The band advocated sex, psychedelic drugs, rebellion and a communal lifestyle.
Paul Kantner, another co-founder of Jefferson Airplane, died in 2016.

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Indonesia tsunami: Aftershocks rock Palu day after disaster – BBC News

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Dramatic video shows buildings being knocked down Strong aftershocks have continued to hit the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, where a major quake and tsunami killed at least 384 people and injured 500.
Dozens remain missing, some thought to be trapped in the debris of collapsed buildings in the city of Palu.
Bodies have been lying in city streets and the injured are being treated in tents because of damage to hospitals.
An air traffic controller at Palu airport died ensuring a plane took off safely after Friday’s quake.
The scale of casualties and damage beyond the city is still unclear.
Anxious survivors in Palu bedded down in the open air on Saturday night, heeding advice by officials not to return to their homes as a precaution. Some buildings were completely flattened. Image copyright Grant Dotulong Image caption It is feared people are trapped in the debris of Palu’s Roa Roa Hotel
Indonesia is prone to earthquakes because it lies on the Ring of Fire – the line of frequent quakes and volcanic eruptions that circles virtually the entire Pacific rim.
In 2004, a tsunami triggered by an earthquake off the Indonesian island of Sumatra killed 226,000 people across the Indian Ocean, including more than 120,000 in Indonesia. ‘We don’t know their fate’
By Rebecca Henschke, BBC News, Sulawesi
As we travel to the area devastated by the huge quake and tsunami we are meeting people heading the same way desperate to find out the fate of their loved ones.
“I know I have already lost three family members,” one man told me, “two of them elderly relatives but one was a young father.” Image copyright AFP Image caption This road near Palu was partially blocked by a landslide
Other members of his family are still missing. “We don’t know their fate,” he tells me.
The images of devastation coming out of Palu are all too eerily familiar to many Indonesians. They evoke memories of the devastating tsunami of 2004 that hit the province of Aceh. Why were so many killed on Friday?
A 7.5 magnitude quake occurred at a shallow depth of 10km (6.2 miles) just off central Sulawesi at 18:03 (10:03 GMT), US monitors say.
A tsunami warning was issued but lifted within the hour.
Indonesia’s meteorological agency has been criticised for its response but officials say the waves struck while the warning was in place.
People including dancers were still busy on the beach in Palu (population: 335,000), preparing for a festival, and were caught when waves up to 3m (10ft) in height swept in. Image copyright EPA Image caption Palu’s landmark Ponulele Bridge came down
Video on social media shows people screaming and fleeing in panic.
“The tsunami… dragged cars, logs, houses,” Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for Indonesia’s disaster agency, told Reuters news agency. “It hit everything on land.”
Some people survived by climbing 6m (18ft) trees, he added.
As well as destroying homes, the quake wrecked a shopping centre, a mosque, a hotel and a road bridge. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Homes were wiped away in Palu
Reports are still coming in of the impact of the disaster on communities further up the coast from Palu and closer to the quake’s epicentre, including the smaller town of Donggala, where there was at least one death and 10 people were injured.
“We have heard nothing from Donggala and this is extremely worrying,” the Red Cross said in a statement.
“This is already a tragedy, but it could get much worse.” What are survivors saying about their ordeal?
When the quake hit, “we all panicked and ran out of the house,” Anser Bachmid, 39, told AFP news agency. “People here need aid – food, drink, clean water. We don’t know what to eat for dinner tonight.”
“I just ran when I saw the waves hitting homes on the coastline,” Palu resident Rusidanto said.
Dwi Haris, who was in the city for a wedding, was staying in a hotel with his wife and daughter when the quake struck.
“There was no time to save ourselves,” he told the Associated Press news agency. “I was squeezed into the ruins of the wall… I heard my wife cry for help but then silence. I don’t know what happened to her and my child. I hope they are safe.”
With back and shoulder injuries, he is being treated outdoors at Palu’s Army Hospital. What is being done to help?
Aid is being flown from the capital Jakarta into Palu airport, using the part of its runway still intact.
Some people injured or affected by the quake were evacuated on a military transport plane.
Patients are being treated in the open outside city hospitals and at least one military field hospital has been erected.
Outside one hospital, dead bodies were laid out in bags for relatives to come and look for loved ones. Image copyright AFP Image caption People have been living out in the open since the quake in Palu
The regional head of the Indonesian Doctors Association (IDI), Komang, asked the authorities for immediate help.
“We need tents, medicines, medical personnel, tarpaulins, blankets and more of other things,” he said.
Relief efforts are being hampered by power cuts and damage to roads and other infrastructure. Image copyright EPA Image caption A field hospital is treating the injuring in Palu
The UK-based charity Save the Children is sending an assessment team to the disaster zone.
“Unfortunately the more information that we’re getting, the worse the situation appears to be,” charity spokesman Tom Howells told the BBC from Jakarta. What happened at the airport? Image copyright EPA Image caption The shattered tower at the airport
The rest had run for their lives when the tower started to sway but Mr Agung stayed behind to ensure Batik Air Flight 6321, which was on the runway, got away safely.
He then jumped from the fourth floor of the tower, fearing it was about to collapse, and was fatally injured.
Yohannes Sirait, spokesman for Air Navigation Indonesia, said he had potentially saved the lives of hundreds of people aboard the plane, losing his own in the process.
Colleagues paid tribute on Twitter, sharing photos of Mr Agung and soldiers carrying his covered body past a guard of honour.

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Tsunami hits Indonesian cities after powerful earthquake | World news

A powerful earthquake that rocked the Indonesian island of Sulawesi and triggered a tsunami has killed at least 384 people, with Indonesia’s vice-president, Jusuf Kalla, warning the death toll could rise into the thousands.
Kalla said there had been “no word” yet about casualties in the Sulawesi city of Donggala, home to 300,000 people.
The Red Cross said in a statement that the situation was “extremely worrying”.
“We’re now getting limited communications about the destruction in Palu city, but we have heard nothing from Donggala and this is extremely worrying.”
Athonius Gunawan Agung, an air traffic controller who jumped off a tower roof as it was collapsing while waving out the last flight from Palu airport on Friday night, was one of the first casualties of the disaster.
The 21-year-old broke several bones, including an arm and a leg as he jumped off the tower. His employers sent a helicopter to take him to another city for treatment, but he died 20 minutes before it arrived.
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Residents trying to salvage belongings from their homes which collapsed after an earthquake and tsunami hit Palu on Sulawesi island. Photograph: Muhammad Rifki/AFP/Getty Images
The 7.5-magnitude earthquake struck Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, just before dusk on Friday, wreaking havoc and destruction across the city and triggering a deadly tsunami on its coast.
In the city of Palu, home to 350,000, at least 384 people have already been confirmed dead, with more than 500 injured.
The quake destroyed thousands of homes in the city, as well as an eight-storey hotel, hospital and a large department store.
The damage has been described as extensive: a main highway was cut off by a landslide and a large bridge washed away by the tsunami wave, which hit Palu’s Talise beach and the coastal town of Donggala.
The tsunami wave reportedly reached as high as 6 metres, and as it approached land was travelling up to 250mph (400km/h).
“The tsunami didn’t come by itself,” said Indonesia’s disaster agency spokesperson Sutopo Purwo Nugroho. “It dragged cars, logs, houses, it hit everything on land.”
Indonesia’s geophysics agency (BMKG) has faced criticism over its handling of a tsunami warning issued after the earthquake was detected.
The agency lifted its tsunami warning 34 minutes after it was first issued following the earthquake based on data available from the closest tidal sensor, around 200 km (125 miles) from Palu.
“We have no observation data at Palu. So we had to use the data we had and make a call based on that,” said Rahmat Triyono, head of the earthquakes and tsunami centre at BMKG.
On Saturday morning as residents awoke to the destruction, with some areas entirely flattened – a horizon of scattered wood, debris and corrugated iron roofs – people have been desperately trying to find their missing relatives.
A Facebook page for information on Palu city has become a pop-up ledger for missing persons, with family members posting pictures of their missing children, wives, fathers and grandparents, in the hope that someone will find them.
Of the almost 400 dead, emergency teams have only identifed 97.
Palu locator map In the aftermath of the disaster, phone communications and seven power stations were knocked out, although on Saturday morning the state electricity company had recovered power at two plants.
With limited communications, it has been impossible for authorities to determine the full extent of the damage or death toll, especially in the coastal town of Donggala, population 270,000.
“Donggala is still unreachable because communications are still cut off,” disaster spokesperson Sutopo, told reporters on Saturday afternoon.
Sutopo said bodies of people killed by the tsunami had been found on the shores of local beaches, but there is yet to be an official tally.
Early witness reports said that people had been killed on Talise beach in Palu.
Facebook Twitter Pinterest A man looks for his belongings amid the debris of his destroyed house in Palu. Photograph: Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images
“Many corpses are scattered on the beach and floating on the surface of the sea,” one local resident, Nining, told kompas.com .
Photos shared on social media showed bodies being lined up on a shoreline, their faces covered in cloth.
Authorities have warned the extent of the tragedy could worsen in the coming days, as more information from currently disconnected areas comes to light.
Hundreds of people planning to attend a beach festival who are now missing, may be among the rising toll.
“When the [tsunami] threat arose yesterday, people were still doing their activities on the beach and did not immediately run – and they became victims,” Sutopo said
Amateur footage that has gone viral on Indonesian social media shows a huge wave hitting the coastline, engulfing the roofs of houses as it crashes into the city, and floods into a nearby mosque.
Search and rescue teams have been deployed to the worst-affected areas, with authorities saying that military transport planes and helicopters would be deployed along with “all national potential”. About 700 army and police officers have also been dispatched to assist in the emergency response.
Indonesia tsunami area graphic The military has also started sending in cargo planes with aid, authorities said, from Jakarta and other cities, but evacuees still badly need food and other basic necessities.
As of Saturday evening, more than 16,000 people had been displaced, evacuating to 24 centres in Palu. Indonesia’s president, Joko Widodo, is scheduled to visit evacuation centres in Palu on Sunday.
Indonesia’s disaster agency is working to restore electricity and communications, as well as address urgent needs, such as the provision of medical treatment, temporary housing and basic supplies such as food and water.
Sulawesi tsunami devastates coast in Indonesia – in pictures Read more
Palu’s airport also sustained damage to its control tower and runway. Commercial flights were suspended on Saturday, with only humanitarian and search and rescue flights permitted, although authorities are assessing whether the airport can be reopened on Sunday.
The air traffic controller, Agung, is being honoured by his employers AirNav Indonesia , in a ceremony in the city of Makassar on Saturday night. His rank will be raised by two levels, before his body is handed over to family members.
The strongest quake, caused by activity in the Palu-Koro faultline, hit at 6.02pm on Friday at depth of 10km, and has been followed by dozens of smaller aftershocks, including one of 6.7. An earlier 6.1 quake in central Sulawesi killed several people, injured 10 and damaged dozens of houses.
The shallow tremor was more powerful than a series of earthquakes that killed hundreds on the Indonesian island of Lombok this July and August.
People living hundreds of miles from the epicentre reported feeling the massive quake on Friday, hours after a smaller jolt killed at least one person in the same region.
Indonesia is prone to earthquakes because of its location on the “ring of fire”, an arc of volcanoes and faultlines in the Pacific basin.
Topics Indonesia Earthquakes Tsunamis Natural Asia Pacific news

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Conservative Party conference app reveals MPs’ numbers – BBC News

Conservative Party conference app reveals MPs’ numbers 29 September 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image caption The Tory party’s app for the conference was readily available to download on the Apple app store Conservative MPs including Boris Johnson have had their phone numbers and other personal details revealed by the party’s conference app.
A Guardian columnist highlighted the security breach on Twitter and the BBC was also able to access private details of people attending the event.
The Conservative Party apologised for “any concern caused” and said “the technical issue has been resolved”.
The Information Commissioner’s Office said it would be making inquiries.
BBC political correspondent Chris Mason said the technical glitch was “deeply, deeply embarrassing” for the party.
The Guardian’s Dawn Foster, who is attending the conference, tweeted about the security breach and said she had been able to access the former foreign secretary’s personal details, including his mobile phone number.
She shared a redacted picture of Mr Johnson’s profile, which did not reveal his phone number.
It appears that people could access an MP’s personal details by entering their email address, without a password, when pressing the attendee’s button in the app.
This button has since been removed on the app, which was created by Australian firm Crowd Comms.
A Tory spokesman said the app was “now functioning securely” and the party would be “investigating the issue further”. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Boris Johnson and Michael Gove are among those whose personal details have been shared on Twitter after the security glitch in the Conservative Party conference app
The Press Association said the details of Environment Secretary Michael Gove had also been shared online.
Pictures on Twitter show people apparently changing individuals’ profile pictures and leaving messages on the app’s internal messaging system.
One Twitter user posted a snapshot of Mr Gove’s profile picture, which had been changed to a snap of media mogul Rupert Murdoch.
Mr Gove previously worked as a journalist at The Times, one of Mr Murdoch’s papers. Image caption Michael Gove’s profile picture was changed to that of media mogul Rupert Murdoch
The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) said it would be making inquiries about the breach and added that “organisations have a legal duty to keep personal data safe and secure”.
The ICO’s statement added under the EU’s new GDPR regulation, the Conservative Party has 72 hours to notify the regulator of a personal data breach that “could pose a risk to people’s rights and freedoms”.
One of Labour’s shadow cabinet, Jon Trickett, criticised the Conservatives for the breach and said: “How can we trust this Tory government with our country’s security when they can’t even build a conference app that keeps the data of their members, MPs and others attending safe?”
The Conservative Party conference is being held in Birmingham and is due to start on Sunday. Related Topics

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