Indonesia quake death toll 'at least 832' – BBC News

Indonesia quake death toll ‘at least 832’ – BBC News

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption It is feared many people remain trapped in collapsed buildings At least 832 people were killed in the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, the national disaster agency says.
Many people were reported trapped in the rubble of buildings that collapsed in Friday’s 7.5-magnitude earthquake, agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho told a news conference.
The quake triggered tsunami waves as high as 6m (20ft), he added.
Vice-President Jusuf Kalla said the final death toll could be thousands.
Rescuers have been digging by hand in the search for survivors in the city of Palu.
“What we now desperately need is heavy machinery to clear the rubble. I have my staff on the ground, but it’s impossible just to rely on their strength alone to clear this,” Muhammad Syaugi, head of the national search-and-rescue agency, told AFP news agency.
There have also been concerns about the town of Donggala, where the impact is still unclear.
The Red Cross estimates that more than 1.6 million people have been affected by the earthquake and tsunami which it described as a tragedy that “could get much worse”.
Strong aftershocks have continued to hit the island since Friday’s earthquake.
President Joko Widodo visited Palu to view sites affected by the disaster, including Talise Beach – the main tourist area that was badly affected by the tsunami.
“I know there are many problems that need to be solved in a short time, including communications,” he said. What is the situation in Palu?
Many remain missing in the city of 335,000, some thought to be trapped in the debris of collapsed buildings.
Rescue teams dug by hand to free 24 people trapped in the rubble of the Roa-Roa hotel in the city of Palu, but there are fears that dozens more remain trapped. Image copyright EPA Image caption The tsunami left a trail of destruction
Bodies have been lying in city streets and the injured are being treated in tents because of damage to hospitals.
Anxious survivors in Palu bedded down in the open air on Saturday night, heeding advice by officials not to return to their homes as a precaution.
“It feels very tense,” Risa Kusuma, who was with her feverish baby boy at an evacuation centre, told AFP.
“Every minute an ambulance brings in bodies. Clean water is scarce. The minimarkets are looted everywhere.” ‘Supplies running out’
By Rebecca Henschke, in Poso
In Poso, a four-hour drive from Palu, supplies are running out. State-owned petrol stations have closed as they have run dry. People are queuing up at roadside stalls, buying petrol in bottles to take into the affected area and to find missing loved ones. Supermarkets have limited food left and it is difficult to find bottled water.
Ermi Liana, who is travelling with our BBC team, doesn’t know if her parents are alive. “They live close to a bridge that collapsed. I can’t reach them by phone,” she says. “I can only pray they are alive.”
We haven’t seen any aid heading in and there is still no communication link to the town of Donggala. Why were so many killed on Friday?
The 7.5 magnitude quake occurred at a shallow depth of 10km (6.2 miles) just off the central island of Sulawesi at 18:03 (10:03 GMT), triggering a tsunami, US monitors say.
Many people were on the beach in Palu, preparing for a festival, and were caught when waves swept in.
Video shows people screaming and fleeing in panic.
As well as destroying homes, the quake wrecked a shopping centre, a mosque, a hotel and a road bridge.
An air traffic controller at Palu airport died ensuring a plane took off safely after the quake. What do survivors say? Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The moment the tsunami hit
When the quake hit, “we all panicked and ran out of the house,” Anser Bachmid, 39, told AFP news agency. “People here need aid – food, drink, clean water. We don’t know what to eat for dinner tonight.”
“I just ran when I saw the waves hitting homes on the coastline,” Palu resident Rusidanto said.
Dwi Haris, who was in the city for a wedding, was staying in a hotel with his wife and daughter when the quake struck.
“There was no time to save ourselves,” he told the Associated Press news agency. “I was squeezed into the ruins of the wall… I heard my wife cry for help but then silence. I don’t know what happened to her and my child. I hope they are safe.”
With back and shoulder injuries, he is being treated outdoors at Palu’s Army Hospital. What is being done to help?
Aid is being flown from the capital Jakarta into Palu airport, using the part of its runway still intact.
Patients are being treated in the open outside city hospitals and at least one military field hospital has been erected.
The regional head of the Indonesian Doctors Association (IDI), Komang, asked the authorities for immediate help.
“We need tents, medicines, medical personnel, tarpaulins, blankets and more of other things,” he said.
The UK-based charity Save the Children is sending an assessment team to the disaster zone.
“Unfortunately the more information that we’re getting, the worse the situation appears to be,” charity spokesman Tom Howells told the BBC from Jakarta.
Have you been affected by the earthquake? If it is safe to do so, share your experience by emailing
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Elon Musk reaches deal with regulators – BBC News

Elon Musk reaches deal over tweets about taking Tesla private 29 September 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Who is Elon Musk? Elon Musk must step down as Tesla chair and pay a fine after reaching a deal with US regulators over tweets he posted about taking the firm private.
It follows Thursday’s decision by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to sue Mr Musk for alleged securities fraud.
Under the deal, Mr Musk will remain as Tesla CEO but must step down as chairman for three years.
Both he and Tesla will also have to pay a $20m (£15m) fine. The weird and wonderful life of Elon Musk
Under the terms of the deal, he will also have to comply with company communications procedures when tweeting about the firm.
The fraud allegation relates to his August tweet in which he said he was considering taking Tesla off the stock market and into private ownership.
He wrote he had “funding secured” for the proposal, which would value Tesla at $420 per share.
The SEC said those claims were “false and misleading”.
“In truth and in fact, Musk had not even discussed, much less confirmed, key deal terms, including price, with any potential funding source,” the regulator said.
Mr Musk initially responded to the charges by saying the action was “unjustified” and he acted in the “best interests of truth, transparency and investors”. Related Topics

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Kanye West: Rapper changes his name to Ye – BBC News

Who is India’s hugging saint Kanye West tweeted about?
As well as being an abbreviation of his current professional name, West has previously said the word has religious significance for him.
“I believe ‘ye’ is the most commonly used word in the Bible , and in the Bible it means ‘you,'” West said earlier this year, discussing his album title with radio host Big Boy.
“So I’m you, I’m us, it’s us. It went from Kanye, which means the only one, to just Ye – just being a reflection of our good, our bad, our confused, everything. The album is more of a reflection of who we are.” the being formally known as Kanye West I am YE

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Indonesia tsunami: Aftershocks rock Palu day after disaster – News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Dramatic video shows buildings being knocked down Strong aftershocks have continued to hit the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, where a major quake and tsunami killed at least 408 people and injured 500.
Dozens remain missing, some thought to be trapped in the debris of collapsed buildings in the city of Palu.
Bodies have been lying in city streets and the injured are being treated in tents because of damage to hospitals.
An air traffic controller at Palu airport died ensuring a plane took off safely after Friday’s quake.
The scale of casualties and damage beyond the city is still unclear.
In pictures: Indonesia earthquake and tsunami Anxious survivors in Palu bedded down in the open air on Saturday night, heeding advice by officials not to return to their homes as a precaution. Some buildings were completely flattened.
Image copyright Grant Dotulong Image caption It is feared people are trapped in the debris of Palu’s Roa Roa Hotel Indonesia is prone to earthquakes because it lies on the Ring of Fire – the line of frequent quakes and volcanic eruptions that circles virtually the entire Pacific rim.
In 2004, a tsunami triggered by an earthquake off the Indonesian island of Sumatra killed 226,000 people across the Indian Ocean, including more than 120,000 in Indonesia.
‘We don’t know their fate’ By Rebecca Henschke, BBC News, Sulawesi
As we travel to the area devastated by the huge quake and tsunami we are meeting people heading the same way desperate to find out the fate of their loved ones.
“I know I have already lost three family members,” one man told me, “two of them elderly relatives but one was a young father.”
Image copyright AFP Image caption This road near Palu was partially blocked by a landslide Other members of his family are still missing. “We don’t know their fate,” he tells me.
The images of devastation coming out of Palu are all too eerily familiar to many Indonesians. They evoke memories of the devastating tsunami of 2004 that hit the province of Aceh.
Why were so many killed on Friday? A 7.5 magnitude quake occurred at a shallow depth of 10km (6.2 miles) just off central Sulawesi at 18:03 (10:03 GMT), US monitors say.
A tsunami warning was issued but lifted within the hour.
Indonesia’s meteorological agency has been criticised for its response but officials say the waves struck while the warning was in place.
People including dancers were still busy on the beach in Palu (population: 335,000), preparing for a festival, and were caught when waves up to 3m (10ft) in height swept in.
Image copyright EPA Image caption Palu’s landmark Ponulele Bridge came down Video on social media shows people screaming and fleeing in panic.
“The tsunami… dragged cars, logs, houses,” Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for Indonesia’s disaster agency, told Reuters news agency. “It hit everything on land.”
Some people survived by climbing 6m (18ft) trees, he added.
As well as destroying homes, the quake wrecked a shopping centre, a mosque, a hotel and a road bridge.
Image copyright Reuters Image caption Homes were wiped away in Palu Reports are still coming in of the impact of the disaster on communities further up the coast from Palu and closer to the quake’s epicentre, including the smaller town of Donggala, where there was at least one death and 10 people were injured.
“We have heard nothing from Donggala and this is extremely worrying,” the Red Cross said in a statement.
“This is already a tragedy, but it could get much worse.”
What are survivors saying about their ordeal? When the quake hit, “we all panicked and ran out of the house,” Anser Bachmid, 39, told AFP news agency. “People here need aid – food, drink, clean water. We don’t know what to eat for dinner tonight.”
“I just ran when I saw the waves hitting homes on the coastline,” Palu resident Rusidanto said.
Dwi Haris, who was in the city for a wedding, was staying in a hotel with his wife and daughter when the quake struck.
“There was no time to save ourselves,” he told the Associated Press news agency. “I was squeezed into the ruins of the wall… I heard my wife cry for help but then silence. I don’t know what happened to her and my child. I hope they are safe.”
With back and shoulder injuries, he is being treated outdoors at Palu’s Army Hospital.
What is being done to help? Aid is being flown from the capital Jakarta into Palu airport, using the part of its runway still intact.
Some people injured or affected by the quake were evacuated on a military transport plane.
Patients are being treated in the open outside city hospitals and at least one military field hospital has been erected.
Outside one hospital, dead bodies were laid out in bags for relatives to come and look for loved ones.
Image copyright AFP Image caption People have been living out in the open since the quake in Palu The regional head of the Indonesian Doctors Association (IDI), Komang, asked the authorities for immediate help.
“We need tents, medicines, medical personnel, tarpaulins, blankets and more of other things,” he said.
Relief efforts are being hampered by power cuts and damage to roads and other infrastructure.
Image copyright EPA Image caption A field hospital is treating the injuring in Palu The UK-based charity Save the Children is sending an assessment team to the disaster zone.
“Unfortunately the more information that we’re getting, the worse the situation appears to be,” charity spokesman Tom Howells told the BBC from Jakarta.
What happened at the airport? Anthonius Gunawan Agung, 21, was the only person left in the airport’s control tower after the earthquake , Australian broadcaster ABC reports.
Image copyright EPA Image caption The shattered tower at the airport The rest had run for their lives when the tower started to sway but Mr Agung stayed behind to ensure Batik Air Flight 6321, which was on the runway, got away safely.
He then jumped from the fourth floor of the tower, fearing it was about to collapse, and was fatally injured.
Yohannes Sirait, spokesman for Air Navigation Indonesia, said he had potentially saved the lives of hundreds of people aboard the plane, losing his own in the process.
Colleagues paid tribute on Twitter, sharing photos of Mr Agung and soldiers carrying his covered body past a guard of honour.
Skip Twitter post by @AirNav_Official Telah wafat saat menjalankan tugasnya sebagai personel layanan navigasi penerbangan, Saudara Anthonius Gunawan Agung, Air Traffic Controller (ATC) AirNav Indonesia Cabang Palu pada Sabtu (29/09). #RIPAgung #DoaUntukSulteng #PrayforDonggala #PrayforPalu pic.twitter.com/6Wpobp3R7m
— AirNav Indonesia (@AirNav_Official) September 29, 2018 Report End of Twitter post by @AirNav_Official
Skip Twitter post 2 by @AirNav_Official #RIPAgung pic.twitter.com/hLLaLRDCCC
— AirNav Indonesia (@AirNav_Official) September 29, 2018 Report End of Twitter post 2 by @AirNav_Official
In another development, more than half the 560 inmates at Palu’s prison escaped after its walls collapsed, the Associated Press reports.
“It was very hard for the security guards to stop the inmates from running away as they were so panicked,” said its warden, Adhi Yan Ricoh.
How big a hazard are quakes for Indonesia? More than half of the world’s active volcanoes above sea level are part of the Ring of Fire.
Just last month, a series of deadly earthquakes struck the Indonesian island of Lombok. The biggest, on 5 August, killed more than 460 people.
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