'Austin Powers' star Verne Troyer's death ruled a suicide

‘Austin Powers’ star Verne Troyer’s death ruled a suicide

U.S. news ‘Austin Powers’ star Verne Troyer’s death ruled a suicide The actor’s April death was caused by alcohol intoxication, putting his blood alcohol level more than three times the legal limit. by Doha Madani / Oct.10.2018 / 8:37 PM GMT Breaking News Emails Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings. SUBSCRIBE
The death of “Austin Powers” actor Verne Troyer in April has been declared a suicide .
An autopsy report released by the Los Angeles County medical examiner-coroner said that the actor died from “sequelae of alcohol intoxication,” or alcohol abuse, and that he had a blood alcohol content more than three times the legal limit of 0.08 at the time of his death. Troyer was 49. ‘Austin Powers’ star Verne Troyer dead at 49 Apr.22.2018 01:26
Troyer, best known for his role as Dr. Evil’s sidekick, Mini Me, in the “Austin Powers” films, had a history of depression, according to the report. Troyer had received treatment for alcohol abuse just a year before his death.
The actor’s spokesperson released a statement to Troyer’s social media pages in April hinting at a death by suicide.
“Over the years he’s struggled and won, struggled and won, struggled and fought some more, but unfortunately this time was too much,” the statement said. “Depression and suicide are very serious issues. You never know what kind of battle someone is going through inside. Be kind to one another. And always know, it’s never too late to reach out to someone for help.”
If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text TALK to 741741 or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for additional resources. Breaking News Emails Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings. SUBSCRIBE

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Melania Trump says she might be ‘the most bullied person’

Politics News Melania Trump says she might be ‘the most bullied person’ The first lady said her Be Best campaign is focusing on social media and online behavior in part because of “what people are saying about me.” by Associated Press / Oct.11.2018 / 2:08 PM GMT First lady Melania Trump tours the Egyptian pyramids and Sphinx in Giza, Egypt, Oct. 6, 2018, the final stop on her 4-country tour through Africa. Saul Loeb / AFP – Getty Images Breaking News Emails Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings. SUBSCRIBE
First lady Melania Trump said she could be “the most bullied person” in the world.
She made the remark during a television interview in which she promoted her Be Best initiatives, which tackles online bullying. Critics have pointed out that her husband, President Donald Trump, routinely rips people for their looks, and what he says is a lack of talent or intelligence.
“I could say I’m the most bullied person in the world,” Mrs. Trump said in the ABC News interview, broadcast Thursday on “Good Morning America.” Melania Trump responds to pith helmet backlash Oct.09.2018 04:15
Mrs. Trump said her Be Best campaign is focusing on social media and online behavior in part because of “what people are saying about me.”
“We need to educate the children of social emotional behavior so when they grow up … they know how to deal with those issues,” she said.
The first lady also revealed that there are people in the White House that she and the president can’t trust.
She didn’t name names but said she let her husband know about them.
“Well,” she said, “some people, they don’t work there anymore.”
But, asked if some untrustworthy people still work in the White House, she said, “Yes.”
The Trump administration has dealt with an anonymous senior official’s newspaper op-ed critical of the Republican president and with numerous staff departures. This week, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley announced she’s leaving at the end of the year.
The president, speaking by phone on Fox’s “Fox & Friends,” was asked about why people he and his wife don’t trust are still in his administration.
“I didn’t know people in Washington, and now I know everybody,” he said. “I know some that I wish I didn’t know.”
Her full interview, conducted on her recent trip to Africa, airs Friday night in an ABC News special, “Being Melania — The First Lady.” Breaking News Emails Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings. SUBSCRIBE

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Homeless deaths: At least 449 reported in the past year – BBC News

Andrew’s story: Died after being assaulted Image copyright Sussex Police Image caption Brighton-based homeless man Andrew O’Connell died in August after being assaulted
Andrew O’Connell, who was homeless in Brighton, was attacked just before midnight on 7 August.
The 54-year-old was discovered at Royal Pavilion Gardens the next day and was taken to hospital, but later died.
The man from Kent was described by his family as “a kind, intelligent man with a free spirit who loved to travel”.
They added: “As a family we are utterly devastated, hurt and angry.”
Sergio Lemori, 32, who is also homeless, has been charged with Mr O’Connell’s murder.
Shelter chief executive Polly Neate said: “We see, first-hand, the suffering [homelessness] causes.
“From families trapped in cramped and dingy B&Bs, to those forced to endure the dangers of sleeping rough.”
She called on the government to build more social homes and “ensure housing benefit is enough to cover the cost of rent”.
TBIJ’s investigation, which was produced in conjunction with Channel 4 News , revealed the death toll could be significantly higher as there is no official definition of homelessness used by local authorities.
No official statistics exist that count the number of deceased homeless people, but the Office of National Statistics said it has begun work on an official database.
TBIJ said that its figures for Scotland – where it reported 42 deaths – were particularly likely to be “a big underestimate”.
In Northern Ireland, the figures are comparatively high. Statistics obtained by investigative news website The Detail showed that 148 people registered as homeless died while waiting for social housing. between October 2017 and August 2018.
Some of them may have been in leased accommodation while they waited, but were officially classed as homeless by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption How can someone work, pay taxes and still be homeless?
Homeless charity Crisis says there has been a 169% increase in the number of homeless people in England since 2010.
A Ministry of Housing spokeswoman said the government takes any homeless death “extremely seriously”.
She added: “We are investing £1.2bn to tackle all forms of homelessness, and have set out bold plans backed by £100m in funding to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and end it by 2027.”

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White House Will ‘Look Into’ Fox News’ Decision to Stop Broadcasting Trump Rallies – The Daily Beast

a day ago White House Will ‘Look Into’ Fox News’ Decision to Stop Broadcasting Trump Rallies
The White House has vowed to “look into” a decision taken by Fox New s to stop broadcasting Donald Trump’s rallies live and in full because they’re no longer bringing in high ratings. Politico reports viewing figures for Trump rallies have dropped and tend to be similar to, or even below, those for regular programming. The network only showed clips of his three rallies over the last week, rather than broadcasting the whole events uninterrupted. The report states White House figures are concerned Trump is losing control of a key platform ahead of the midterms. One senior White House official told Politico they were unsure why the network is cutting away from the rallies, saying officials planned “to look into that” and that they expect White House Communications Director Bill Shine, a former Fox News executive, to be in touch with his former colleagues about the move. White House Will ‘Look Into’ Fox Not Showing Trump Rallies Cheat Sheet ®

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WHO voices alarm as academics denied visas to visit UK conference | UK news

The World Health Organization (WHO) has expressed alarm about the impact of the UK government’s immigration policy on international academic cooperation after several foreign scholars were denied visas to attend a conference.
The organisers of the Global Symposium on Health Systems Research in Liverpool , which runs until Friday, are compiling a dossier of immigration problems that are understood to have affected at least 10 of the event’s 2,000 registered delegates.
They include Sabu Kochupurackal Ulahannan, who is researching nutrition and inequality among children in remote tribal communities in Kerala, south-west India. He was one of 291 delegates awarded a scholarship to attend the event, in an initiative – partly funded by the UK government – aimed at low- and middle-income countries.
But Kochupurackal Ulahannan, who is studying for a doctorate at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology in Thiruvananthapuram, the state capital of Kerala, was denied a visa by UK immigration officials. He was told he had an “insufficient balance” on his bank account.
The refusal came after he was was asked to pay 16,000 rupees (£168), equivalent to half his monthly salary, for the visa application. This included a fee to fast-track the paperwork after devastating floods in Kerala meant he could not attend a visa verification interview in Bengaluru until 22 August, six weeks before he intended to travel to Liverpool.
In a blogpost Kochupurackal Ulahannan condemned the actions of the immigration authorities as discriminatory. In an email to the Guardian he added: “It is both racial discrimination and discrimination against [the] poor. My experience shows that people belonging to low income groups from lower and middle countries face double discrimination on the basis of income status and ethnicity.”
Prof Asha George, the chair of Health Systems Global, which is hosting the event, confirmed other academics had faced similar problems.
She said: “We are saddened that some of our colleagues are unable to join us in Liverpool this week for visa reasons. We are committed to finding ways to improve access to forums such as the Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, which promote international debate and exchange on critical global concerns.”
Kochupurackal Ulahannan’s plight has prompted calls for international academic events to be relocated to countries with a less hostile immigration policy.
Dr Masoud Dara, a communicable diseases coordinator at the WHO, said: “International events are better organised in countries where the invited participants can more easily attend. The tough immigration policies may have impact on academic cooperation, if specific measures are not put in place to facilitate scientists’ travel to and from various countries.”
Martin McKee, a professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said it was no longer acceptable for the UK to host international academic events because of visa restrictions.
Martin McKee #FBPE (@martinmckee) It’s no longer acceptable to organise major international meetings in UK or US. If you create hostile environments you can’t expect people to come & spend money. We had problems during @ASPHERoffice meeting in London – eminent colleague unable to get visa. Disgraceful.
October 7, 2018 McKee said: “Academic collaboration is yet another consequence of the government’s ‘hostile environment’ policy. At the same time that it is promoting global health through its international development funding, it is denying visas to those who are working on the ground to improve the health of some of the poorest people in the world as they seek to share their experiences and learn from others at conferences in the UK. In these circumstances, it makes sense to hold such conferences in countries where they can participate more easily.”
He pointed out that Prof Vesna Bjegović-Mikanović, a Serbian former president of The Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region, was prevented from attending the group’s annual directors’ retreat in London in June because of delays to her visa application.
Last month there were warnings that Britain was closing the door on academic collaboration after a Nigerian lawyer was denied entry to attend an African studies conference at Cambridge University.
Kabir Sheikh, the former chair of Health Systems Global, urged members to read Kochupurackal Ulahannan’s blogpost . “The board takes this very seriously and visa access is a key factor among others in host selection,” he tweeted.
In his post Kochupurackal Ulahannan wrote: “The voices of people reporting social injustice and exclusion should emerge from the very communities that face them. However, maintaining a policy of requiring that applicants have a three-month account balance which shows evidence of sufficient means of subsistence, as a crucial criterion for visa approval for conferences on areas of social justice, implicitly implies that a career in those fields is only acceptable for individuals from economically sound backgrounds.”
The Home Office is aware of Kochupurackal Ulahannan’s case, but does not discuss individuals. A spokesman said: “All UK visa applications are considered on their individual merits and in line with UK immigration rules and guidance.
“The onus is on the applicant to demonstrate that they satisfy the immigration rules. In addition to any support provided by a sponsor, decision-makers will take account of an applicant’s own personal and financial circumstances in assessing whether the application meets the requirements of the immigration rules.”
Topics Immigration and asylum World Health Organization Brexit Academics European Union Foreign policy news

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