"Education most effective way to fight fake news" – PoliticsEnglish

“Education most effective way to fight fake news” – PoliticsEnglish

Prime Minister Ana Brnabic was participating on Monday at the Web Summit in Lisbon. Source: srbija.gov.rs 11:11 Tweet Share (Tanjug) According to Forbes, this is the world’s best technology conference with more than 70,000 participants, the Serbian government said.
At this gathering, where directors and founders of technology companies, start-ups, representatives of governments, international institutions and media participate, Brnabic is representing Serbia in two panels.
The Prime Minister spoke at the panel on false news, together with Executive Director of Mozilla Mitchell Baker and Director of the Guardian Media Group David Pemsel. Matthew Garahan from the Financial Times was moderator at the panel.
Brnabic pointed out that false news, alternative facts and the post-truth phenomenon are not new, but that in today’s world, just because of the Internet, smart phones and social networks, it is spreading much easier, faster and more efficiently.
She recalled one of Churchill’s quotes that “a lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on”, and stressed that in today’s world the truth has not “yet been awakened” and false news has already been spread all over the world.
According to Brnabic, what is the biggest problem with false news is that they create an atmosphere of mistrust and polarise societies.
In a conversation with panel participants, the Prime Minister said that the great challenge of false news is that they have the greatest impact on creating a feeling of mistrust among young people, who have no faith in any idea, or because of that they feel part of society.
With fake news, we will best deal with investing in education, and that’s why Serbia invests in changing the concept of education – let’s teach young people how to think, not what to think, Brnabic said.
She said that the main mechanisms for the fight against false news, in addition to education, and analytical thinking, encouraged young people to question information and various authorities, creative industries, innovation, science, research and development.
Brnabic pointed out that the government’s task is to provide timely and accurate information to prevent speculation, and added that false news would make governments more resilient and transparent.
All participants in the Lisbon meeting agreed that false news is a modern challenge for democracy.
Later during the day, the Prime Minister will talk about the challenges and results that Serbia has achieved in the field of the development of technology and creative industries and the potentials of new technologies for economic development.
The participants and speakers of the Web Summit in Lisbon are United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, Microsoft’s President Brad Smith, EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, Vice President of Apple Lisa Jackson, Founder of Pinterest Ben Silberman, Portuguese President Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa and many others.

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Authorities: 12 people dead in California bar shooting | CTV News

Ventura County sheriff Geoff Dean says 11 victims were killed in a shooting at a crowded Southern California bar.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. PREVIOUS STORY FOLLOWS.
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — A gunman shot 11 people inside a crowded Southern California country dance bar Wednesday, and witnesses described a chaotic scene as panicked patrons smashed windows to get out. The gunman died inside the bar, police said.
Ventura County sheriff’s Sgt. Eric Buschow did not say how the gunman died.
Authorities have not confirmed whether any of the wounded had died.
Ventura County sheriff’s Capt. Garo Kuredjian said hundreds of people were inside the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks at 11:20 p.m., and shots were still being fired when deputies arrived.
Several people from inside the bar told TV stations that a tall man wearing all black with a hood and his face partly covered first shot at a person working the door, then opened fire, seemingly at random, at the people inside.
People screamed and fled to all corners of the bar, while a few people threw barstools through the windows and helped dozens escape, witnesses said.
It was college night and country two-step lessons were being offered Wednesday at the Borderline, according to its website.
Kuredjian said it has been “quite some time” since there was a shooting of any kind in Thousand Oaks, a city of about 130,000 people about 40 miles (64 kilometres) west of Los Angeles, just across the county line.

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Should there be a tax on red meat? – BBC News

Should there be a tax on red meat? 7 November 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Getty Images A “meat tax” could prevent almost 6,000 deaths per year in the UK, according to researchers, but should politicians be telling people what they can and can’t eat?
Scientists at the University of Oxford say governments should consider imposing price hikes on red meat – such as beef, lamb and pork – to reduce consumption.
They say it would save lives and more than £700m in UK healthcare costs, according to new research. So why can red meat be harmful?
Various research has linked eating red meat to an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
In 2015 the World Health Organization warned that processed meats , like bacon, sausages and ham, could cause cancer, while unprocessed red meat could also increase your risk.
And eating lots of red meat doesn’t just have an impact on your own health.
Researchers at the University of Oxford said meat eaters were also increasing the burden on the health service and the economy, due to a loss of workforce from ill health.
There is also a growing awareness of the environmental impact of eating red meat.
The high levels of land and water use and carbon emissions associated with its production mean cutting down is one of the key ways individuals can help tackle climate change . Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Dr Marco Springmann tells Today eating only one portion of red meat a week could help tackle global warming How could a tax work? And what would it do to prices?
Researchers say a meat tax could cut consumption of processed meat by about two portions per week in high-income countries.
In the UK, the study suggests a tax of 14% on red meat and 79% of processed meat.
This would mean the price of a 227g Tesco Sirloin Steak would increase from £3.80 to £4.33.
And for a pack of eight pork sausages from Sainsbury’s the price would increase from £1.50 to £2.69. Has there been anything like this before? Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Sugar tax: Drinks becoming pricier and in smaller bottles
Earlier this year the government introduced a sugar tax on soft drinks, meaning manufacturers have to pay a levy on high-sugar drinks.
The tax has already had an effect, with some leading brands reducing the sugar content in their products to avoid the levy.
But whether it means consumers buy fewer sugary drinks remains to be seen. Will the sugar tax work?
The impact of charging 5p for single-use carrier bags suggests financial incentives can change behaviour.

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Pakistan blasphemy case: Asia Bibi freed from prison – BBC News

Blasphemy laws around the world
Asia Bibi, a mother-of-five, was released from prison in the city of Multan, her lawyer Saif Mulook said.
Also known as Asia Noreen, she was convicted in 2010 of insulting the Prophet Muhammad during a row with neighbours.
Several countries have offered her asylum. Image copyright EPA Image caption Asia Bibi’s acquittal sparked protests by Islamists
The Pakistani government has said it will start legal proceedings to prevent her going abroad after agreeing the measure to end the violent protests.
Many of the protesters were hardliners who support strong blasphemy laws and called for Asia Bibi to be hanged.
One Islamist leader said all three Supreme Court judges also “deserved to be killed”.
A spokesman for the hardline Tehreek-e-Labaik (TLP) party said Asia Bibi’s release was in breach of their deal with the government.
“The rulers have showed their dishonesty,” TLP spokesman Ejaz Ashrafi told Reuters.
The deal also saw officials agree not to block a petition for the Supreme Court to evaluate Asia Bibi’s acquittal in the light of Islamic Sharia law. What was Asia Bibi accused of?
The trial stems from an argument Asia Bibi had with a group of women in June 2009.
They were harvesting fruit when a row broke out about a bucket of water. The women said that because she had used a cup, they could no longer touch it, as her faith had made it unclean.
Prosecutors alleged that in the row which followed, the women said Asia Bibi should convert to Islam and that she made offensive comments about the Prophet Muhammad in response.
She was later beaten up at her home, during which her accusers say she confessed to blasphemy. She was arrested after a police investigation.
Acquitting her, the Supreme Court said that the case was based on unreliable evidence and her confession was delivered in front of a crowd “threatening to kill her”. Why is this case so divisive?
Islam is Pakistan’s national religion and underpins its legal system. Public support for the strict blasphemy laws is strong.
Hard-line politicians have often backed severe punishments, partly as a way of shoring up their support base. The last hours of a Christian sanitary worker in Pakistan
But critics say the laws have often been used to exact revenge after personal disputes, and that convictions are based on thin evidence.
The vast majority of those convicted are Muslims or members of the Ahmadi community, but since the 1990s scores of Christians have been convicted. They make up just 1.6% of the population.
The Christian community has been targeted by numerous attacks in recent years, leaving many feeling vulnerable to a climate of intolerance.
Since 1990, at least 65 people have reportedly been killed in Pakistan over claims of blasphemy. Related Topics

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