Brexit full legal advice published – BBC News

Brexit full legal advice published – BBC News

DUP ‘would back Tories in confidence vote’
While the UK would have no unilateral right to withdraw from the backstop – a measure designed to prevent the return of physical checks on the Irish border by the UK and EU sharing a single customs territory – she insisted neither the UK nor the EU wanted it to come into force in the first place.
But the Democratic Unionists said the advice was explicit that Northern Ireland would end up subject to different EU regulatory and customs rules from the rest of the UK and be treated as a “third country” in terms of trade with England, Scotland and Wales.
The BBC’s political editor Laura Kuenssberg said that, amid fears Mrs May was heading for a heavy defeat in next Tuesday’s vote on the final deal, there was talk among MPs about a compromise amendment being tabled on the backstop, giving Parliament some kind of check on it coming into force. Report What does the full advice to PM say?
The government argued that Mr Cox’s analysis of the Brexit deal, published on Monday, was adequate and disclosing his full and final advice would be against the national interest.
Labour and other opposition parties said ministers had “wilfully” refused to comply with a binding vote in the Commons last month which demanded full disclosure and MPs agreed with this in a vote on Tuesday.

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Brexit full legal advice published – BBC News

DUP ‘would back Tories in confidence vote’
While the UK would have no unilateral right to withdraw from the backstop – a measure designed to prevent the return of physical checks on the Irish border by the UK and EU sharing a single customs territory – she insisted neither the UK nor the EU wanted it to come into force in the first place.
But the Democratic Unionists said the advice was explicit that Northern Ireland would end up subject to different EU regulatory and customs rules from the rest of the UK and be treated as a “third country” in terms of trade with England, Scotland and Wales.
The BBC’s political editor Laura Kuenssberg said that, amid fears Mrs May was heading for a heavy defeat in next Tuesday’s vote on the final deal, there was talk among MPs about a compromise amendment being tabled on the backstop, giving Parliament some kind of check on it coming into force. Report What does the full advice to PM say?
The government argued that Mr Cox’s analysis of the Brexit deal, published on Monday, was adequate and disclosing his full and final advice would be against the national interest.
Labour and other opposition parties said ministers had “wilfully” refused to comply with a binding vote in the Commons last month which demanded full disclosure and MPs agreed with this in a vote on Tuesday.

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Brexit: Arron Banks firm has ‘no address’ – BBC News

Leave.EU and Banks firm face £135,000 fines
Mr Banks is a multimillionaire insurance mogul behind the Go Skippy car insurance brand.
He loaned £8m to the Leave.EU campaign before the 2016 EU referendum and says the money came from his company, Rock Services, based at his office in Catbrain Lane, Bristol.
The Electoral Commission suspects the money may have come from another Banks entity, Rock Holdings , based on the Isle of Man.
They, along with the National Crime Agency, are examining whether “impermissible money” may have been used to help fund the Leave campaign before the 2016 EU referendum.
The law on political money is simple. The source should be clear, transparent and British.
If the £8m came from Rock Holdings, then the money would be impermissible and Mr Banks would be in trouble.
Mr Banks says he is a British taxpayer and the money was generated in Britain. Following the trail to Rock Holdings
For more than a year, accountant and investigative journalist Iain Campbell has been looking into Mr Banks’s financial empire, all of which is private and some is held offshore in Gibraltar and the Isle of Man.
Mr Campbell noted that Rock Services has successfully qualified for a limited disclosure exemption under the Companies Act, allowing it to provide less information in its accounts.
But in order to gain this exemption, it had stated in its notes that the accounts of its parent company, Rock Holdings, were “publicly available” at Catbrain Lane.
So last month, Mr Campbell tested this out in person. He went to the Catbrain Lane base, only to be told that they were not available “that day”.
Since then, lawyers for Rock Services, Browne Jacobson, have written to the accountant setting out a series of restrictions on how, when and where the “publicly available” accounts could be viewed and how their contents could be recorded. Mr Campbell told Newsnight: “This is completely unacceptable.”
Newsnight made its own trip to Catbrain Lane this week but when reporter John Sweeney requested an opportunity to inspect the “publicly available” accounts of Rock Holdings, he was asked to leave and escorted out of reception. Image caption Newsnight’s John Sweeney went to Catbrain Lane to inspect the “publicly available” accounts, but was asked to leave.
Browne Jacobson later emailed the BBC with an explanation – referring to a “risk assessment” by Mr Banks’s company on “safety and security” – which, in effect, denied the BBC sight of the accounts at Catbrain Lane. Where to find Rock Holdings?
At the time of the referendum, Rock Holdings’ address had been registered at Murdoch Chambers, South Quay, Douglas, Isle of Man.
Newsnight visited island this week and its first stop was to Murdoch Chambers, which now appears to be an accommodation address, facing a gas showroom overspill car park. The door was locked and no-one answered.
The Newsnight team then moved on to 18 Athol Street, also in Douglas. This was the address, albeit “care of Greystone”, that Rock Holdings filed with the Isle of Man registry in November this year.
But when Newsnight dropped by, it was told by Greystone that Rock Holdings “was neither approved nor agreed by or known to any director or officer of the company or ourselves”.
This means the company that the Electoral Commission suspects may be the true source of the biggest donation in British political history is a closed book in a secrecy jurisdiction with no official address and when you try to look at its accounts you cannot Any further questions to answer?
Newsnight has separately investigated Ural Properties. This company name appeared in an internal email chain sent by Mr Banks’s team to the BBC, to prove his innocence of the charge that the money might have come from Russia.
Mr Banks faced controversy after his three meetings with the Russian ambassador became public knowledge and over whether he travelled to Russia in 2016, the year of the referendum. He previously told Newsnight: “No money came from the men with snow on their boots.”
One internal email in the documents sent to the BBC contained the comment: “Redact the reference for Ural Properties and any references which include sensitive info e.g. the account numbers that the money was sent from.”
An online website, Source Material, obtained the accounts of Ural Properties in Gibraltar and passed them on to Newsnight.
Two nominee companies have owned Ural Properties and the first is linked to a known associate of Mr Banks, Alan Kentish. Last year Mr Kentish was arrested by the Gibraltar authorities for alleged non-disclosure of information. No charges followed.
The company owns two flats in Gunwharf, Portsmouth, overlooking the sea lane into the Royal Navy base.
Newsnight asked Mr Banks specific questions about Rock Holdings, the fact that it was in default and its lack of a registered address. Mr Banks was also asked about Ural Properties. He made no substantive reply.
However, he did provide the following statement: “This is the seventh programme designed to smear me and discredit Brexit. I have repeatedly stated that I am a UK taxpayer and the funds were from UK. The NCA have had ‘full disclosure’ of the relevant bank accounts and an explanation of the where the money came from. We will be doing a victory lap of the TV studios once this matter is resolved and look forward to being interviewed by John ‘the Trot’ Sweeney or the ever ‘professional’ Kirsty or Emily.”
You can watch Newsnight on BBC 2 weekdays 22:30 or on iPlayer . Subscribe to the programme on YouTube or follow them on Twitter . Related Topics

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Data problems hit O2 mobile network – BBC News

Image copyright Getty Images O2 says it does not know when full service will be restored to millions of customers who cannot access data services on their smartphones.
The mobile network said it was working “flat out” with Ericsson to fix the technical problems.
The Swedish company, which makes mobile network equipment, confirmed that an issue with its software was to blame.
Services such as bus timetable information have also been affected, while many businesses faced disruption.
O2 has 25 million customers and also provides services for the Sky, Tesco, Giffgaff and Lycamobile networks, which have another seven million users.
“The network issue we are currently experiencing remains a top priority for us and we are working as quickly as possible to fix the issue,” O2 said.
Its chief executive, Mark Evans, tweeted to “reassure our customers that we are doing everything we can to fix the issue with our network”.
Image Copyright @MarkEvansO2 @MarkEvansO2 Report Image Copyright @MarkEvansO2 @MarkEvansO2 Report Ericsson said there had been network disruption for customers in multiple countries.
President Börje Ekholm, said: “The faulty software that has caused these issues is being decommissioned and we apologise not only to our customers but also to their customers. We work hard to ensure that our customers can limit the impact and restore their services as soon as possible.”
Knock-on effects Network services on most of the affected networks had been restored on Thursday, he added. “We are working closely with the remaining customers that are still experiencing issues.”
Japan’s Y!Mobile network, owned by Softbank, was one also affected by the outages.
The difficulties in the UK were first reported at about 05:30 on Thursday.
Network down: how people are coping without a signal
Spain’s Telefonica owns O2, which has the UK’s second-largest mobile network after EE, which is now part of BT.
The company has said voice calls are not affected by the problem, but some O2 customers say they cannot make calls or send texts either.
The outage is having knock-on effects for other services that use the O2 network, including Transport for London’s electronic timetable service at bus stops, which has stopped working.
William Webb, a tech consultant and former Ofcom director, said it was unusual to take this long to resolve the problem: “It’s probably some kind of a software update that one of the suppliers to the network has issued that for some reason proved incompatible or failed – and I guess now they’re going to be looking at whether they can reverse that out again or fix that.”
Tom Morrod at market research firm IHS Markit said data was increasingly important to consumers, with half of UK mobile users prioritising internet connectivity above calls and texts.
“As well as the inconvenience to consumers and the associated frustration, having a major network out of action creates productivity challenges for businesses. Many businesses will have employees commuting or out in the field that have lost work time today,” he said.

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Male suicide rates in Wales ‘a national emergency’ – BBC News

Male suicide rates in Wales ‘a national emergency’ By India Pollock BBC Wales social affairs correspondent 5 December 2018 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Rhian Burke Image caption Rhian Burke’s late husband Paul took his own life shortly after the death of their baby son George – her charity supports bereaved families The number of men who die by suicide should be considered a “national emergency”, a group of AMs has said.
There should be as big a focus on mental health as physical health in order to reduce the number of suicides, the health, social care and sport committee said.
Last year, 360 people took their own lives in Wales – the highest figure since 1981 – and 278 of those were men.
The Welsh Government said it would consider the group’s recommendations.
The 31 recommendations in the wide-ranging report on suicide prevention included calls for: The Welsh Government, health boards and councils to fund suicide prevention A suicide prevention training framework to be implemented across all public services in a similar way to domestic violence training A target be introduced for waiting times for psychological therapies
The committee said it was shocked by the lack of support services for those bereaved by suicide.
It said a few organisations provided support, but they received little public money and there was not a consistent approach across Wales. Why construction firms are prioritising mental health
Rhian Burke set up the charity 2 Wish Upon A Star to provide support to bereaved families who have lost a child or young adult under the age of 25.
In 2012 her husband Paul took his own life five days after their baby son George died suddenly from bronchial pneumonia and influenza.
She said following the death of their son the couple received no support and, after her husband’s suicide, “the same thing happened again”.
“Everyone we spoke to was lovely, but there wasn’t much support and not much support immediately. The family liaison [police officers] had no in-depth training and I had GPs Googling support. You ring and you get answer phones and you wait for people to reply.”
The charity receives referrals from A&E departments, critical care units and mortuaries and tries to avoid families having to self-refer. The aim is to contact the family within 24 to 48 hours to offer them support.
She said in 2017 around a third of their referrals were because of suicide.
“When you lose someone through suicide, you live with the guilt, thinking ‘could I have stopped it?’ You need someone to sit with you to help you rationalise.” Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Talking to someone in distress will not make things worse, says Dr Dai Lloyd AM
The committee also said: It was concerned by evidence that showed that only 60% of children who end up in hospital after self-harming received psychological assessments The Welsh Government needed to take urgent action to ensure all doctors in Wales understood the guidelines about sharing information so they could share concerns to prevent anyone taking their own life without fear of being sacked for breaching confidentiality More needed to be done to reduce the stigma associated with mental health which prevented people from talking about it.
Dr Dai Lloyd AM, who chairs the committee, said everyone had a part to play in reaching out and offering support to those in need.
“We know that if someone is having suicidal thoughts, receiving support from someone else can make a big difference,” he said.
A Welsh Government spokesman said they welcomed the publication of the report.
“We will consider the recommendations in detail, along with those in the Talk to me 2 [the Wales suicide and self-harm prevention action plan] mid-point review, before responding in due course,” he added.
If you are struggling to cope, you can call Samaritans free on 116 123 (UK and Ireland) or visit the BBC Action Line website .
You can also contact the Community Advice and Listening Line for Wales , which offers free confidential support with help to find local mental health services, on 0800 132 737 or text ‘Help’ to 81066. Related Topics

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