US shutdown: Thousands of federal employees miss payday – BBC News

US shutdown: Thousands of federal employees miss payday – BBC News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption ‘I don’t need a wall, I want money to plant crops’ Hundreds of thousands of US government workers have missed their first payday of the year as the partial shutdown of federal agencies bites deeper.
Employees such as prison guards, airport staff and FBI agents have been working without pay.
The government shutdown, which began last month, will become the longest in history on Saturday on its 22nd day.
President Donald Trump is refusing to approve a federal budget unless it includes funding for a border wall.
But Democrats have rejected his request for $5.7bn (£4.5bn).
About a quarter of the federal government is out of operation until a spending plan is agreed, leaving 800,000 employees unpaid.
How much has shutdown hit US economy? On Friday, those workers missed their first payday of this shutdown. Some shared their blank payslips on social media.
Oscar Murillo, an aerospace engineer at Nasa, posted his $0 cheque on Twitter and said he had actually lost money because of mandatory deductions.
Another Twitter user, Cat Heifner, shared what she said was her brother’s payslip, showing he had been paid one cent for his work as an air traffic controller.
Image Copyright @catheifner @catheifner Report Image Copyright @catheifner @catheifner Report Meanwhile, the classified advertising website Craigslist has been flooded with listings from federal workers trying to sell their possessions.
Items ranging from beds to old toys have been listed as “government shutdown specials”.
“Sells for $93.88 at Walmart. Asking $10,” one advert for a child’s rocking chair reads. “We need money to pay bills.”
A food bank in Washington, DC reported an influx of federal workers.
Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Just why has the US government partially shut down? Radha Muthiah, head of Capital Area Food Bank, said that dozens of volunteers are working to pack bags of food for affected staff.
Of the 800,000 federal employees going unpaid, about 350,000 are furloughed – a kind of temporary lay-off – while the rest are continuing to work.
Thousands have reportedly applied for unemployment benefits amid the financial uncertainty.
One major airport, Miami International, will close an entire terminal this weekend because so many security staff have called in sick.
Sixteen ways the US shutdown is hurting Where do we go from here? What is Washington doing to resolve the stalemate? The House and Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill on Friday to ensure all government workers receive retroactive pay after the shutdown ends. The president is expected to sign the legislation.
But that may be small consolation to those federal employees currently in dire straits, with no end in sight to the impasse.
At a roundtable discussion about border security on Friday with state and local leaders, Mr Trump again demanded that Democrats approve funding for a wall or steel barrier.
How much of Trump’s wall has been built? What border politicians think of Trump’s wall “Name it ‘peaches’,” the Republican president said. “I don’t care what they name it, but we need money for that barrier.”
However, the Democratic leader of the US House of Representatives said the ball was in Mr Trump’s court.
Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters: “When the president acts, we will respond to whatever he does.”
Image copyright Reuters Image caption Mr Trump visited the US-Mexico border in Mission, Texas, on Thursday What about the president’s plan to declare an emergency? Mr Trump has been threatening to declare a national emergency, which would allow him to bypass Congress and build the wall by raiding military budgets.
But on Friday he stepped back from such a move, which would provoke constitutional uproar and legal challenges.
He maintained he had a right to declare the emergency, but added: “I’m not going to do it so fast.”
Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Five questions about Trump’s border wall According to the Associated Press, senior White House aide Jared Kushner is among those who have urged caution to Mr Trump on the issue.
US media report the White House is considering diverting some of the $13.9bn allocated last year by Congress for disaster relief in such areas as Puerto Rico, Texas and California to pay for the wall.
But Republican congressman Mark Meadows, who is close to the president, said that option was not under serious consideration.

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US partial government shutdown becomes longest on record – BBC News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Just why has the US government partially shut down? The partial shutdown of the US government has become the longest ever, with no end in sight to the political standoff.
On Saturday it reaches its 22nd day, overtaking the previous record – the 21-day shutdown in 1995-96 under then-President Bill Clinton.
President Donald Trump is refusing to approve a budget unless it includes funds for a wall on the Mexican border.
Democrats have rejected his request for $5.7bn (£4.5bn).
About a quarter of the federal government is still out of operation until a spending plan is agreed, leaving 800,000 employees unpaid.
On Friday, those workers – including prison guards, airport staff and FBI agents – missed their first salaries of the year.
Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption ‘I don’t need a wall, I want money to plant crops’ Meanwhile, President Trump has calmed speculation that he is about to declare a national emergency in order to bypass Congress and get the money he needs. His proposed border wall was a key election pledge.
He described an emergency declaration as an “easy way out” and said he would prefer Congress to resolve the problem.
How much has shutdown hit US economy? But he added: “If they can’t do it… I will declare a national emergency. I have the absolute right.”
Correspondents say Democrats would mount an immediate legal challenge if Mr Trump made such a move.
How have workers reacted? On Friday, some workers who missed their first payday of the year shared their blank payslips on social media.
Oscar Murillo, an aerospace engineer at Nasa, posted his $0 cheque on Twitter and said he had actually lost money because of mandatory deductions.
Another Twitter user, Cat Heifner, shared what she said was her brother’s payslip, showing he had been paid one cent for his work as an air traffic controller.
Skip Twitter post by @catheifner If you wonder how the shut down is really affecting folks… my brother’s pay stub as an Air Traffic Controller… be better America pic.twitter.com/6XhZ5ROqvx
— cat heifner (@catheifner) January 10, 2019 Report End of Twitter post by @catheifner
A food bank in Washington DC is arranging five pop-up markets on Saturday for unpaid federal workers.
Radha Muthiah, head of Capital Area Food Bank, said dozens of volunteers were working to pack bags of food for affected staff.
Meanwhile, the classified advertising website Craigslist has been inundated with listings from government employees trying to sell their possessions.
Items ranging from beds to old toys have been listed as “government shutdown specials”.
“Sells for $93.88 at Walmart. Asking $10,” one advert for a child’s rocking chair reads. “We need money to pay bills.”
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption President’s Trump’s promised wall – or barrier – on the Mexican border is a key issue in the shutdown Of the 800,000 federal employees going unpaid, about 350,000 are furloughed – a kind of temporary lay-off – while the rest are continuing to work.
Thousands have reportedly applied for unemployment benefits amid the financial uncertainty.
One major airport, Miami International, will close an entire terminal this weekend because of a shortage of security agents caused by the shutdown.
The agents are “essential” federal workers and expected to work – despite not being paid until the shutdown ends.
Instead many agents are calling in sick in protest at the situation, the Miami Herald reports.
What is the political situation? The House and Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill on Friday to ensure all government workers receive retroactive pay after the shutdown ends. The president is expected to sign the legislation.
But that may be small consolation to those federal employees currently in dire straits, with no end in sight to the impasse.
Image copyright EPA Image caption President Trump shows no signs of backing down At a roundtable discussion about border security on Friday with state and local leaders, Mr Trump again demanded that Democrats approve funding for a wall or steel barrier.
How much of Trump’s wall has been built? What border politicians think of Trump’s wall However, the Democratic leader of the US House of Representatives said the ball was in Mr Trump’s court.
Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters: “When the president acts, we will respond to whatever he does.”
According to the Associated Press, senior White House aide Jared Kushner – Mr Trump’s son-in-law – is among those who have cautioned the president against declaring a national emergency.
US media report the White House is considering diverting some of the $13.9bn allocated last year by Congress for disaster relief in such areas as Puerto Rico, Texas and California to pay for the wall.
But Republican congressman Mark Meadows, who is close to the president, said that option was not under serious consideration.
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YouGov survey: British sarcasm ‘lost on Americans’ – BBC News

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption “With the greatest respect…” Britons like to think they have a “special relationship” with the US, based on a common language and cultural, historical and political ties.
But, according to one of the UK’s most respected polling companies, there’s one chasm the English language can’t always bridge – the British love of passive-aggressive statements.
In the words of YouGov , “half of Americans wouldn’t be able to tell that a Briton is calling them an idiot”.
YouGov showed a number of common British phrases, including “with the greatest respect”, “I’ll bear it in mind” and “you must come for dinner”, to Britons and Americans.
“While not all the phrases show a difference in transatlantic understanding, there are some statements where many Yanks are in danger of missing the serious passive aggression we Brits employ,” YouGov said.
The starkest difference was in the phrase “with the greatest respect” – which most Britons took to mean “I think you are an idiot”, but nearly half of Americans interpreted as “I am listening to you”.
Skip Twitter post by @YouGov Half of Americans wouldn’t be able to tell that a Briton is calling them an idiot, finds our new study on British subtext
What does “with the greatest respect” mean?
“I think you are an idiot”: 🇬🇧 68% / 🇺🇸 40%
“I am listening to you”: 🇬🇧 24% / 🇺🇸 49% https://t.co/9EZXEJjUtM pic.twitter.com/Us8OsMPgc3
— YouGov (@YouGov) January 11, 2019 Report End of Twitter post by @YouGov
YouGov based its survey on a popular meme of British phrases and their subtext.
It’s not clear who came up with the table , although it’s done the rounds online for several years – and was first seen by the BBC in 2011 in a blog by Oxfam .
What the British say What the British mean What others understand I hear what you say I disagree and do not want to discuss it further He accepts my point of view With the greatest respect… I think you are an idiot He is listening to me That’s not bad That’s good That’s poor That is a very brave proposal You are insane He thinks I have courage Quite good A bit disappointing Quite good I would suggest… Do it or be prepared to justify yourself Think about the idea, but do what you like Oh, incidentally/by the way The primary purpose of our discussion is… That is not very important I was a bit disappointed that I am annoyed that It doesn’t really matter Very interesting That is clearly nonsense They are impressed I’ll bear it in mind I’ve forgotten it already They will probably do it I’m sure it’s my fault It’s your fault Why do they think it was their fault? You must come for dinner It’s not an invitation, I’m just being polite I will get an invitation soon I almost agree I don’t agree at all He’s not far from agreement I only have a few minor comments Please re-write completely He has found a few typos Could we consider some other options? I don’t like your idea They have not yet decided YouGov decided to show the same phrases, and each of the meanings, to about 1,700 Brits and 1,900 Americans , and asked them which matched their own interpretation the most closely.
The survey showed that some – though not all – of the stereotypes in the table were statistically correct.
There was plenty of common ground – for example, a majority of both British and US adults consider “I was a bit disappointed that” a polite way of saying “I am annoyed that” – rather than “it doesn’t really matter”.
But those in the UK are much more likely to consider “I’ll bear it in mind” and “I hear what you say” to be attempts to brush you off.
And a higher proportion of Britons than Americans (44% to 31%) think “that is a very brave proposal” actually means “you are insane”.
Image caption The British have a long history of sarcasm Plenty of Americans working in the UK have complained about British passive-aggressiveness, or their annoying tendency to beat around the bush.
Idiosyncrasies of the Brits at work Why do Brits and Americans swear so differently? What do Brits think about Americans? Why you may find US colleagues ‘more polite’ than Brits But UK expats have also complained about American insults directed at Brits.
One writer for BBC America came up with the following translations for American English :
Americans say This means I love it! You just don’t CARE, do you? What the hell did you just do? I’m dying of embarrassment here Oh, you can get away with it, you’re British An American wouldn’t be seen dead wearing what you’re wearing or doing what you just did Bless her heart! This phrase is a bit of a put down, effectively allowing the speaker to slag off someone without recrimination. At the end of the day, while the British may like to think they have a more sophisticated sense of sarcasm, they might have more in common with their American cousins than they think.
We’ll bear that in mind.

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Florida governor suspends Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel | Fox News

Florida School Shooting Published 12 hours ago Last Update 10 hours ago Florida governor suspends Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel By Matt Richardson | Fox News close Video Florida Gov. DeSantis suspends Sheriff Scott Israel over his handling of Parkland high school shooting Raw video: Florida Governor Ron DeSantis stands with family members from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School to announce he has suspended Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel and appointed Gregory Tony as the new sheriff.
Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel , who faced criticism over his department’s response to the deadly Parkland, Florida, school shooting last year, was officially suspended by new Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday.
“Sheriff Israel has repeatedly failed and has demonstrated a pattern of poor leadership,” DeSantis said in a statement.
“He failed to protect Floridians and visitors during the tragic Fort Lauderdale International Airport shooting in 2017. He failed in his duties to keep our families and children safe during the devastating shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb.14, 2018,” the statement read. “These incidents demonstrate Sheriff Israel’s repeated incompetence and neglect of duty. The families of the victims deserve accountability. It is my job as governor to ensure that the safety of our local communities, especially the safety of our children, is paramount. Government officials must be held accountable for their actions, and/or inactions.
“For these reasons, I am suspending Sheriff Israel from office effective immediately.”
DeSantis later tweeted that he was suspending Israel for “his repeated failures, incompetence and neglect of duty.”
DeSantis formally announced the appointment of Gregory Tony as sheriff. Tony, a former Coral Springs Police sergeant, will be Broward County’s first African-American sheriff, according to a statement released by the governor.
“It is my intention to embark on this enormous task to restore the confidence of families and residents of Broward County toward the Broward Sherriff’s Office, which also requires that I fix the problems that exist,” Tony said.
Seventeen people were killed in the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland . The suspect was identified as Nikolas Cruz.
Calls for Israel to resign came shortly after the deadly shooting unfolded and in April, the Broward Sheriff's Office Deputies Association voted “no confidence” in him. The association cited the national criticism surrounding Israel and his office following the shooting.
Minutes after DeSantis' announcement, Israel said he would fight the suspension.
“There was no wrongdoing on my part. I served the county honorably,” he said. “False narratives,” Israel claimed, are continuing “but not in a court of law. In a court of law, only the facts matter.”
Israel said he “wholeheartedly” rejected the governor's order and would fight it in court, arguing that DeSantis was making a “power grab” against the will of the county's people who elected him.
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Under Florida law, the governor can suspend elected officials for criminal activity, misfeasance, incompetence or neglect of duty. Israel's lawyer, Stuart Kaplan, said this week the sheriff did nothing warranting removal and his future should be left to Broward voters in the 2020 election.
Israel had been sheriff six years.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Matt Richardson is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @MRichardson713 .

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Blocking Brexit could cause far right surge – Grayling – BBC News

These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Brexit Image copyright AFP Blocking Brexit could lead to a surge in far-right extremism in the UK, a cabinet minister has said.
Transport Secretary Chris Grayling told the Daily Mail that not leaving the EU would cause the 17 million people who voted for Brexit to feel “cheated”.
This could end centuries of “moderate” politics in the UK, he said, as he urged his colleagues to back Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal.
A vote on the agreement takes place in the Commons on Tuesday.
MPs are widely expected to reject the deal, negotiated between the EU and UK, with more than 100 Conservative MPs among those opposing it.
Some ministers have warned the UK faces Brexit “paralysis” if this happens. ‘Nastiness in politics’
Just days before the critical vote, Mr Grayling, who campaigned to leave the EU, told the Daily Mail there would be a “different tone” in British politics if the UK failed to leave the EU, and predicted a “less tolerant society” and a “more nationalistic nation”.
“It will open the door to extremist populist political forces in this country of the kind we see in other countries in Europe,” Mr Grayling told the paper.
“If MPs who represent seats that voted 70% to leave say ‘sorry guys, we’re still going to have freedom of movement’, they will turn against the political mainstream,” he added.
“There’s already a nastiness and unpleasantness in our politics, more people with extreme views, more people willing to behave in an uncivilised way,” he said.
Lord Hattersley, a former deputy Labour Party leader, dismissed Mr Grayling’s comments, saying not many would regard him as “an expert in these matters”.
He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that he did not believe a general election – which Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has pushed for – would happen.
Lord Hattersley, a minister in the Wilson and Callaghan governments, called for another referendum, saying the party had to risk losing the support of Labour supporters who voted to leave the EU in order to do the “right” thing. Quick guide: What is a no-deal Brexit?
A “no-deal” Brexit is where the UK would cut all ties with the European Union overnight.
Theresa May’s government, and many others, believe this would be hugely damaging and want a more gradual withdrawal. But if Parliament can’t agree on that, and nothing else takes its place, the UK will leave without a deal.
This would mean the UK would not have to obey EU rules. Instead, it would need to follow World Trade Organization terms on trade. Many businesses would see new taxes on imports, exports and services, which are likely to increase their operating costs. That means the prices of some goods in UK shops could go up.
The UK would also lose the trade agreements it had with other countries as a member of the EU, all of which would need to be renegotiated alongside the new agreement with the EU itself.
Manufacturers in the UK expect to face delays in components coming across the border.
The UK would be free to set its own immigration controls. However some UK professionals working in the EU and UK expats could face uncertainty until their status was clarified. The European Commission has said that even in a no-deal scenario, UK travellers won’t need a visa for short visits of up to 90 days.
The border between Northern Ireland and the Irish republic would become an external frontier for the EU with customs and immigration controls, though how and where any checks would be made is not clear.
Some Leave supporters think that leaving without a deal would be positive if the right preparations were made. They say criticism is scaremongering and any short term pain would be for long term gain.
But critics – including both Brexit supporters and opponents – say that leaving without a deal would be a disaster for the UK: driving up food prices, leading to shortages of goods and gridlock on some roads in the South East resulting from extra border checks. Image copyright PA

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