Meet Teesside's takeaway owner 'Saigon Sam' – BBC News

Meet Teesside’s takeaway owner ‘Saigon Sam’ – BBC News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Video Meet Teesside’s takeaway owner ‘Saigon Sam’
From Vietnam to Middlesbrough: Teesside’s “Saigon Sam” has been reunited with his rescuer 40 years later.
Sam was a part of the two million people who fled Vietnam in the 1980s by small boats during the civil war.
He was rescued by a British oil tanker called Ebalina, and eventually resettled in Middlesbrough.
Sam tells us what it was like moving to the North East as a refugee to now owning a Chinese takeaway in Teesside.
Video Journalist: Ashni Lakhani

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Brexit: Seaborne Freight no-deal ferry contract scrapped – BBC News

Image copyright EPA Image caption Seaborne Freight planned to launch services from Ramsgate by Brexit day on 29 March The government has axed its no-deal Brexit contract with a ferry company which had no ships, after the Irish company backing the deal pulled out.
Transport Secretary Chris Grayling had faced criticism for the £13.8m deal with Seaborne Freight, which the BBC found had never run a ferry service.
The government said it is in “advanced talks” to find another ferry firm.
But local MP Craig Mackinlay said this could be the “last throw of the dice” for commercial shipping from Ramsgate.
Meanwhile, Labour has called on Mr Grayling to resign or be sacked, describing him as “the worst secretary of state ever”.
Could Channel ports cope with no-deal Brexit? No-deal Brexit ferry contract queried A really simple guide to Brexit What preparations are being made for a no-deal? Seaborne Freight was awarded the £13.8m contract in December to run a freight service between Ramsgate and Ostend, Belgium, in the event that Britain leaves the EU without a deal.
The government was criticised for choosing Seaborne Freight, a company with no ships or trading history, and for leaving too little time to establish the new ferry service before the Brexit deadline of 29 March.
And local politicians in both Ramsgate and Ostend warned that the ports at both ends of the route will not be ready the deadline.
At the time, the government said it awarded the contract “in the full knowledge” that Seaborne, which was formed in April 2017, was “a new shipping provider” but said the company had been “carefully vetted”.
On Saturday, the Daily Telegraph reported that Arklow Shipping, a major Irish shipping firm, withdrew its support from Seaborne “without warning”.
The Department for Transport (DfT) said that it had become clear that Seaborne “would not reach its contractual requirements”, after Arklow Shipping backed out of the deal.
A spokesman said: “The government is already in advanced talks with a number of companies to secure additional freight capacity – including through the Port of Ramsgate – in the event of a no-deal Brexit.”
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The Port of Ramsgate has not had a regular ferry service since 2013 Thanet District Council – which covers Ramsgate – said it was “disappointing” that Arklow Shipping had pulled out of the deal. It said it was in talks with the DfT about the port’s role “in terms of supporting Brexit resilience”.
The council has been pumping money into the port to get it ready for ferry services. Earlier this week, it was considering cutting its budget for the port but, at the request of Mr Grayling, delayed its decision.
Ramsgate has not had a regular ferry service since 2013 and needs to be dredged before services can start.
‘The last throw of the dice’ Following the news that Seaborne Freight had lost the contract, the Conservative MP for South Thanet, Mr Mackinlay, said ferry companies had “come and gone over the last few years” but “none of them have come to anything”.
“For me, this Seaborne operation was potentially the last throw of the dice for a chance for commercial shipping out of Ramsgate,” he said.
“Perhaps it is time that we turned the page on Ramsgate port being for commercial activity and we can start doing something rather more exciting on those acres of land, potentially a marina village, hotels, restaurants, some housing, something really exciting that I think would be more welcomed by many people in Ramsgate.”
Andrew Gwynne, the shadow secretary of state for communities and local government, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “This is yet again another indication of a government that had no plan for Britain should we leave the European Union without a deal.
“It’s another example of a major disaster in the hands of Chris Grayling who must be classed as the worst secretary of state ever.”
The government said that no taxpayer money has been transferred to Seaborne.
It added that its confidence in the viability of the deal with Seaborne was based on Arklow Shipping’s backing of the company and the assurances it received from them.

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Russia islands emergency over polar bear ‘invasion’ – BBC News

Image copyright PA Image caption Polar bears are forced on to land to look for food as sea ice diminishes A remote Russian region has declared a state of emergency over the appearance of dozens of polar bears in its human settlements, local officials say.
Authorities in the Novaya Zemlya islands, home to a few thousand people, said there were cases of bears attacking people and entering residential and public buildings.
Polar bears are affected by climate change and are increasingly forced on to land to look for food.
Russia classes them as endangered.
Hunting the bears is banned, and the federal environment agency has refused to issue licences to shoot them.
The bears had lost their fear of police patrols and signals used to warn them off, meaning that more drastic measures were needed, officials said.
They say that if other means to scare off the bears fail a cull could be the only answer.
Polar bears ‘running out of food’ The ‘face of climate change’? Polar bears travel further on ice The archipelago’s main settlement, Belushya Guba, has reported a total of 52 bears in its vicinity, with between six and 10 constantly on its territory.
Local administration head Vigansha Musin said more than five bears were on the territory of the local military garrison, where air and air defence forces are based.
“I’ve been on Novaya Zemlya since 1983,” he said in an official press release. “There’s never been such a mass invasion of polar bears.”
His deputy said normal life was being disrupted by the threat.
“People are scared, afraid to leave their homes, their daily routines are being broken, and parents are unwilling to let their children go to school or kindergarten,” the deputy head of the local administration, Alexander Minayev, said.
With Arctic sea ice diminishing as a result of climate change, polar bears are forced to change their hunting habits and spend more time on land looking for food – which potentially puts them in conflict with humans.
In 2016 five Russian scientists were besieged by polar bears for several weeks at a remote weather station on the island of Troynoy, east of Novaya Zemlya.

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Jamal Khashoggi murder: Trump fails to point finger – BBC News

Why the Khashoggi crisis is far from over
And on Saturday Baroness Helena Kennedy, member of a UN team of international experts who visited Turkey to investigate the murder, told the BBC the murder was planned at the highest level.
But Saudi officials insist he was murdered by a “rogue” team of Saudi agents not acting on the prince’s orders.
An administration statement said Mr Trump “maintains his discretion to decline to act on congressional committee requests when appropriate”.
However, Democratic senators told the New York Times the president was in breach of the so-called Magnitsky Act, which requires a response within 120 days to requests from Senate committee leaders. That deadline passed on Friday.
Please upgrade your browser to view this content. Timeline: Jamal Khashoggi’s death

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Prince Philip, 97, gives up driving licence – BBC News

Image copyright Albanpix Image caption Prince Philip was seen driving a replacement Land Rover two days after the crash The Duke of Edinburgh is to voluntarily give up his driving licence, Buckingham Palace has said.
It comes after the 97-year-old duke apologised over a car crash near the Sandringham estate in Norfolk, in which his Land Rover Freelander landed on its side after a collision with a Kia.
Two days later Norfolk Police gave him “suitable words of advice” after he was pictured driving without a seat belt.
Buckingham Palace said that he surrendered his licence on Saturday.
In a statement, the palace said: “After careful consideration the Duke of Edinburgh has taken the decision to voluntarily surrender his driving licence.”
Norfolk Police confirmed that the duke had surrendered his licence to officers and it would now be returned to the DVLA.
The investigation file for the collision has been passed to the Crown Prosecution Service, which said it would take the latest development into account.
Police speak to Philip for not wearing seat belt Prince Philip’s car ‘careered’ across road Speed camera delay on duke crash road BBC royal correspondent Jonny Dymond, said the decision to give up his licence was entirely down to the duke, according to Buckingham Palace.
“The duke is reported to have acknowledged that the collision last month was his fault,” he said.
“There was a fair deal of criticism of his decision to drive just two days after the crash. Now he has chosen to give up some of his independence and will have a driver from this point on.”
The duke wrote to a woman injured in the crash, which happened on 17 January on the A149 near the Queen’s country estate.
He escaped injury, but Emma Fairweather, a passenger in the Kia, broke her wrist.
The Kia was carrying three people, including a nine-month-old baby boy, his mother who was driving and Ms Fairweather, 46.
In the letter to Ms Fairweather, dated 21 January and reproduced by the Sunday Mirror , the duke acknowledged the “very distressing experience”.
“I would like you to know how very sorry I am for my part in the accident,” he wrote, on Sandringham House headed paper.
“The sun was shining low over the main road. In normal conditions I would have no difficulty in seeing traffic coming… but I can only imagine that I failed to see the car coming, and I am very contrite about the consequences.”
Ms Fairweather had previously criticised the duke for a lack of communication following the crash.
The mother-of-two told the Sunday Mirror: “I thought it was really nice that he signed off as ‘Philip’ and not the formal title. I was pleasantly surprised because of the personalised nature.”
After the crash, Royal biographer Hugo Vickers told BBC News: “Any kind of car accident at the age of 97 is likely to produce shock.
“Some years ago he gave up flying planes long before he needed to because he was scared that if something happened there would be a lot of criticism.
“You know, why was he, at the age of 55, still flying a plane when he should have retired at 48 or something like that.
“So he does listen to these things – he’s very, very sensible.”
What happens when you surrender your driving licence? There is no legal age at which motorists must stop driving, however doctors can advise drivers to give up their entitlements.
If a motorist has a medical condition which affects their driving, it may mean they have to give up their licence until they can meet the medical standards to drive again.
If a driver decides to surrender their licence, or they are advised to do so by a doctor, they must write a letter to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), accompanied by the existing licence, or a good excuse for not enclosing it.

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