Prince Philip 'voluntarily' gives up driving licence | UK News | Sky News

Prince Philip ‘voluntarily’ gives up driving licence | UK News | Sky News

Prosecutors will take into account Prince Philip “voluntarily” surrendering his driving licence as they consider whether to bring charges over a car crash he was involved in last month.
Buckingham Palace confirmed the Duke of Edinburgh gave up his credentials on Saturday.
The 97-year-old was behind the wheel near the Sandringham Estate last month when his Land Rover Freelander collided with a Kia.
He was unhurt but was checked by a doctor.
Both of the women travelling in the Kia received hospital treatment, one for a broken wrist.
The crash sparked a debate as to whether Prince Philip should still be driving at his age. Just 48 hours after the accident, he was pictured driving without a seatbelt .
Image: Prince Philip’s car rolled over after the crash in Norfolk A statement from Buckingham Palace said: “After careful consideration The Duke of Edinburgh has taken the decision to voluntarily surrender his driving licence.”
More from Duke Of Edinburgh Duke apologises for crash that injured two women near Sandringham Duke of Edinburgh crash: Who would be able to stop Prince Philip driving again? The Queen and Prince Philip: 70 years of Royal marriage New photographs celebrate Queen and Prince Philip’s 70th wedding anniversary The Queen and Prince Philip will mark their 70th wedding anniversary in private Prince Philip carries out final royal engagement before retirement A statement by Norfolk Police confirmed the licence had been handed to officers, and that the case was now being considered by prosecutors.
The Crown Prosecution Service stated that the incident file would be reviewed as they considered whether to bring charges, adding they “will take this development into account”.
At the time of the crash, celebrity lawyer Nick Freeman said the duke could be prosecuted for driving without due care and attention, which carries an unlimited fine.
However, he added that Prince Philip could avoid prosecution by handing in his licence as it would lower the chances of a case being in the public interest.
Image: A picture from the scene of the crash shows a vehicle on its side. Pic: KLFM Sky News’ royal correspondent Rhiannon Mills said the decision was likely a difficult one for the prince, a keen motorist.
“I suspect [this] will not have been an easy decision for the Duke of Edinburgh to have made,” she said.
“Since he stepped back from his public duties back in 2017, we understand he has been enjoying a quiet-ish retirement.
“However he has been wanting to stay active, and I think being able to drive around the Sandringham Estate where he spends a great deal of time has actually been a really important part of his independence.
“So I suspect this won’t have been a decision which he has taken lightly.”
Image: Broken glass and car parts on the side of the A149 In the accident on 17 January, Prince Philip’s car flipped over after the collision with the Kia, which was carrying a nine-month-old boy, his mother and another passenger.
More than a week after the crash, the duke wrote a letter to the passengers in the other car to apologise. He blamed the low, bright sun for obscuring his vision.
“I would like you to know how very sorry I am for my part in the accident at the Babingley cross-roads,” Prince Philip said.
Image: Prince Philip driving the Obamas and the Queen into Windsor Castle on the president’s state visit in 2016 While there is no legal limit on driving ages in the UK, motorists have to renew their licence at least 90 days before reaching the age of 70, and then every three years after that.
A licence can only be renewed if the minimum eyesight requirement is met and there is no other reason to prevent a person from driving.
DVLA figures from 2017 show that 100,281 people over the age of 90 hold valid licences, while 248 people over 100 years old have a licence.

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Same-sex penguins raise a baby chick – CBS News

True love has found a way for two male penguins at the Sea Life Sydney Aquarium in Australia”> <link rel="preconnect dns-prefetch" href=

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Chimps use branch as ladder to escape Belfast zoo enclosure | UK news

Breakout is second in recent weeks after runaway red panda found in a nearby garden. Chimpanzees have used a branch to escape from their enclosure at Belfast zoo in the second breach by animals in recent weeks.
They took advantage of damage caused by stormy weather to stage a breakout, which visitors caught on film.
It comes after a red panda cub called Amber was found in a garden less than a mile from the zoo after it escaped from its enclosure last month.
The latest bid for freedom was made by chimps who used a branch as a makeshift ladder and scaled high walls surrounding their pen on Saturday.
Visitors described seeing one of the escapees emerge from the bushes on to a path while others were sitting on top of their enclosure wall.
In footage posted on social media, a child can be heard exclaiming: “Don’t escape, you bad little gorilla.”
Zookeeper Alyn Cairns said trees in the enclosure had been weakened by the storms, allowing the chimps to break them and use them as a ladder to escape.
He told the BBC: “They’re intelligent primates and know they’re not supposed to be out of their enclosure, so got back in themselves.”
Danielle Monaghan, who was at the zoo with her two children, partner and his young nieces, expressed concern about safety.
“I was petrified, obviously, having the kids, and I tried not to show fear but inside I was a bit like: what happens if it attacks us or tries to take the kids or runs over?” she told the BBC.
“But we just had to stay calm. It may have been a different story if it had been aggressive but it absolutely wasn’t. It made us feel at ease. We just walked past it and it was absolutely grand.”
She said they were in disbelief when they saw one of the chimpanzees start to climb out of its enclosure and ended up a foot away when they walked over to take a closer look.
A spokesperson for Belfast city council, which runs the zoo, said one chimpanzee left its enclosure for a short time. “Zookeepers were present as the chimpanzee quickly returned from an adjacent wall to the rest of the group inside the enclosure,” it said.
Topics Belfast Zoos Animals Northern Ireland news

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U.S. steel tariff ‘boondoggle’ offers more exclusions to China than Canada News

If the Trump administration’s tariff policy is meant to target unfair Chinese trade, it sure has a funny way of going about it.
So far, the U.S. Department of Commerce has excluded about 40 per cent of imports of Chinese steel from facing its 25 per cent tariff. But to date, only two per cent of the total volume of Canadian steel imports to the U.S. has been cleared to dodge the tariff.
The head-scratching discrepancy gets even stranger with the United States’ 10 per cent tariff on aluminum imports.
About 86 per cent of Chinese aluminum imports now enter the U.S. tariff-free, while less than one per cent of Canadian aluminum shipments do.
“If the whole point was to do this for China in the first place, then why are the approval rates for China so much higher than other countries?” said Christine McDaniel, a former White House economic adviser, now a senior research fellow with the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.
“It just doesn’t make sense.”
Ottawa says Ontario’s call to drop retaliatory tariffs would mean ‘surrender’ U.S. government shutdown delays ratification of new NAFTA Canada collects $839M in steel and aluminum tariffs, but aid for sector mostly unspent The recent U.S. government shutdown gave McDaniel and her research colleague Danielle Parks an opening to comb through all the exclusion applications submitted last year and group the results by country of origin. Exclusion applications are filed by importers — manufacturers, retailers or construction companies, for example — who want to import tariff-free. McDaniel said the results of their research were so surprising, they ran the numbers a second time just to make sure.
“It does correspond with what we’re hearing anecdotally from steelmakers in Canada — that they’re not getting anything through,” McDaniel said.
Catherine Cobden, the new president of the Canadian Steel Producers Association, said the analysis tells a pretty troubling story.
“Canada’s getting hurt more than others through the tariffs,” she said. “Are these tariffs doing what they were intended to do?”
The tariffs aren’t giving North American suppliers a boost, she said. Quite the opposite.
“Whatever process they’re using, it’s unfairly tilted towards China, which is crazy,” she said. Her association’s members suspected the tariffs were distorting markets, she said, but this work “demonstrates with real data what that picture looks like.”
U.S. steelmakers objecting to exclusions While the results for China conflict with the Trump administration’s rhetoric, the large exporting country that’s been most successful in the exclusion process so far is Japan: 62 per cent of its steel imports to the U.S. no longer face the tariff.
The Japanese manufacture specialty metals; comparable U.S. substitutes tend not to be available for them. It’s possible that what Canadian mills produce is more easily swapped with American product.
Exclusion applications are considered according to specific criteria, such as whether the same product is available in the U.S. Domestic steel companies can monitor these applications and file objections, according to their own business interests. The complicated process also allows for a rebuttal from the company trying to get its shipments excluded.
In some cases, the arguments have sought to interfere in companies’ right to make their own business decisions, McDaniel said. One company, she said, was told it shouldn’t be able to import pipe of a certain length tariff-free when it could buy American pipe and weld pieces together to make up the right length — notwithstanding the extra labour and environmental effects involved.
An employee works next to molten iron at a steel mill of Dongbei Special Steel in Dalian, Liaoning province, China July 17, 2018. “The vast majority of objections are filed by a small handful of U.S. steelmakers,” McDaniel said.
And some aren’t even realistic. “These steelmakers are objecting to way more than they could produce themselves,” based on their annual production capacity, she said.
Those objections are influencing results. Nearly every denied application McDaniel examined resulted from an objection.
The process the U.S. Commerce bureaucrats are using is quite antiquated, she said, and is not tracking cumulative amounts to test what’s realistic, or whether certain countries are emerging as winners or losers: each case is considered in isolation, with no unified strategy driving the results.
“The law firms love this because the more complicated this is, the better for them,” she said. All the separate applications, objections and rebuttals — “they’re billing all of that.
“It’s a big boondoggle.”
Killing jobs instead of creating them? But while profits may be up for the U.S. steel industry, it’s not clear that employment in the sector will rise as well, since automated production at many plants can boost capacity without significantly increasing employment.
Meanwhile, economists like McDaniel warn that — as the second Bush administration’s levying of steel tariffs in 2002 showed — employment in downstream manufacturing suffers from higher metal costs. One analysis of that previous tariff found more jobs were lost in steel-using industries than were protected in steel production.
Separately, Canada’s embassy in Washington is keeping a close eye on the same process McDaniel is analyzing. Its lobbying campaign against the tariffs continues, with Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland in town last week to meet with the head of the Senate finance committee, among others.
According to one estimate based on a range of global trade data and recent U.S. employment and wage trends, #tariffs on steel and aluminum could cost 5,000 jobs in the U.S. auto industry and 400,000 jobs overall – 16 jobs lost for every one created https://t.co/6dcxxfs0aj pic.twitter.com/3itRS9pn8w
— @connect2canada Canada is the top international supplier of both steel and aluminum to the U.S. by a significant margin.
Even though data are only available for the first four months after the steel tariffs took effect last Canada Day, there’s already evidence that Canadian shipments to the U.S. have dropped.
“It’s almost like steel tariffs are just diverting our sources of product. What would normally be from Canada and Brazil and Mexico … now we see the approval rates are much higher for Japan, Thailand, the Netherlands, Poland …” McDaniel said.
For some smaller exporting countries, the U.S. Department of Commerce has approved exclusion requests in volumes far exceeding historical trade volumes. Polish steel, for example, has been approved for exclusions covering nearly nine times the volume of its exports to the U.S. in 2017.
A final analysis of winners and losers in this process is months away: 64 per cent of Canada’s steel applications are still pending, so Canada’s eventual approval rate could improve once the backlog built up during the government shutdown clears.
Only 8 per cent of the applications to exclude Canadian steel from the tariffs have been denied so far. The vast majority of applications for Canadian aluminum (97 per cent) are still sitting in the queue.
Political pressure McDaniel and Parks mapped the exclusions approved so far by Congressional district to enable future analyses to determine whether politics could be playing a role in some of the decisions.
A bipartisan group of senators has endorsed an ongoing D.C. lobbying campaign — “Tariffs Hurt the Heartland” — which is trying to force the administration to bend.
U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington May 18, 2017. (J. Scott Applewhite/The Associated Press) Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey, a Republican who recently made headlines declaring the new NAFTA “dead on arrival” in Congress, outlined how much steel tariffs were costing companies in his state during a news conference Wednesday.
“There are about 140,000 workers who are employed by steel companies who are meant to benefit from these steel tariffs. There are six and a half million people employed in companies that use steel,” he said. “It shouldn’t be so easy … to impose tariffs that can be so economically disruptive and so problematic, and to do it unilaterally.”
Toomey is working on bipartisan legislation to curb the president’s tariff powers.
Politicians are “hearing from their constituents: this is killing us,” McDaniel said.
About the Author Janyce McGregor
Parliamentary Bureau
Janyce McGregor has covered Canadian politics for CBC News since 2001. Send news tips to: Janyce.McGregor@cbc.ca
Follow Janyce on Twitter

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School Shooters: Roots Of Violence Often Include Depression And Desperation : Shots – Health News : NPR

Credit: Ariel Davis for NPR
It’s hard to empathize with someone who carries out a school shooting. The brutality of their crimes is unspeakable. Whether the shootings were at Columbine, at Sandy Hook, or in Parkland, they have traumatized students and communities across the U.S.
Psychologist John Van Dreal understands that. He is the director of safety and risk management at Salem-Keizer Public Schools in Oregon, a state that has had its share of school shootings. In 2014, about 60 miles from Salem, where Van Dreal is based, a 15-year-old boy shot one student and a teacher at his high school before killing himself.
“Someone went out of their way to target and kill children who look like our children, teachers who look like our teachers — and did it for no other reason than to hurt them,” says Van Dreal. “And that’s very personal.”
National WATCH: In A Post-Parkland America, Teens Talk About Gun Culture Still, Van Dreal and other psychologists and law enforcement agents do spend a lot of time thinking about what it’s like to be one of these school shooters, because, they say, that is key to prevention.
How many school shootings?
Tallying up all shootings and instances of school violence is difficult , researchers say; there’s no official count, and various organizations differ in their definitions of school shootings.
For example, an open source database put together by Mother Jones suggests there have been 11 mass shootings (where four or more people died) in schools since the Columbine High School shooting in Colorado in 1999, and 134 children and adults died in those attacks.
NPR Ed Here’s How To Prevent The Next School Shooting, Experts Say Psychologists and law enforcement agencies have been analyzing how these sorts of multivictim attacks came to be, because of what they tell us about many other people who are at risk of becoming violent in schools and the ways we might intervene early, before anger becomes violence.
In the two decades since the Columbine High School shooting, researchers have learned a lot about school shooters. For one thing, many are themselves students, or former students, at the schools they attack. A significant majority tend to be teenagers or young adults.
“There’s no one thing, [but] maybe a couple of dozen different things that come together to put someone on the path to committing an act of mass violence,” says Peter Langman , a clinical psychologist in Allentown, Pa., and the author of two books and several studies about school shootings.
Multiple factors contribute in each case
Most shooters in these cases had led difficult lives, the studies find.
“Adolescent school shooters, there’s no question that they’re struggling and there have been multiple failures in their lives,” says Reid Meloy , a forensic psychologist who has consulted with the FBI.
Many struggle with psychological problems, Meloy says.
Criminal Justice Collaborative Despite Heightened Fear Of School Shootings, It’s Not A Growing Epidemic “We know that mental health issues are very much in the mix,” he says. “The child might be just, you know, very depressed. We also found in one of our early studies that you’ve got this curious combination of both depression and paranoia.”
Studies by the FBI and the U.S. Secret Service have also found that many of the shooters were feeling desperate before the event.
“Whether or not they’ve been diagnosed, or whether or not they’re severely mentally ill, something is going on that could [have been] addressed through some kind of treatment,” says Langman.
But most never got that treatment.
The role of mental health problems
Mental health issues don’t cause school shootings, Van Dreal emphasizes. After all, only a tiny, tiny percentage of kids with psychological issues go on to become school shooters.
But mental health problems are a risk factor, he says, because they can decrease one’s ability to cope with other stresses. And studies have shown that most school shooters have led particularly stressful lives.
Many, though not all, of the perpetrators have experienced childhood traumas such as physical or emotional abuse, and unstable families , with violent, absent or alcoholic parents or siblings, for example. And most have experienced significant losses.
For example, the defendant in the case of the Parkland, Fla., shooting last year had lost his adopted mother to complications from the flu just a couple of months before the school attack. His adopted father had died when he was a little boy.
Shots – Health News If You’re Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed Feeling like an outcast at school may also play a role.
“A lot of these people have felt excluded, socially left out or rejected,” says Van Dreal. Studies show that social rejection at school is associated with higher levels of anxiety, depression, aggression and antisocial behavior in children.
A 2004 study by the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education found that nearly three-quarters of school shooters had been bullied or harassed at school.
Marginalized kids don’t have anchors at school, says Van Dreal. “They don’t have any adult connection — no one watching out for them. Or no one knows who they are anymore.”
And the absence of social support at the school, Meloy says, is a big risk factor.
“People who do these kinds of targeted attacks don’t feel very good about themselves, or where they’re headed in their lives,” says Van Dreal. “They may wish someone would kill them. Or they may wish they could kill themselves.”
For example, Dylan Klebold, one of the perpetrators of the Columbine shooting, had been depressed and suicidal two years prior.
“About half of the school shooters I’ve studied have died by suicide in their attack,” says Langman. “It’s often a mix of severe depression and anguish and desperation driving them to end their own lives.”
Of course, most people who feel suicidal don’t kill others.
So what makes a small minority of kids who have mental health issues and thoughts of suicide turn to violence and homicide?
Meloy and Van Dreal think it’s because these individuals had been struggling alone — either because they were unable to ask for help or their cries went unheard when the adults in their lives didn’t realize the child needed support.
When despair turns to anger and a desire for revenge
When someone has been struggling alone for a while and failing, their despair can turn into anger, the researchers say.
“There’s loss. There’s humiliation. There’s anger. There’s blame,” says Meloy.
That sort of anger can lead to homicidal thoughts, Van Dreal says.
They start out fantasizing about revenge, says Meloy.
“So the fantasy is one where the teenager starts to identify with other individuals who have become school shooters and have used violence as a way to solve their problem,” he says.
These days, Meloy adds, it’s easy for a troubled kid to go online and research how previous shooters planned and executed their attacks.
Easy access to guns — one of the biggest risk factors — then turns these fantasies into reality.
Psychologists say these attacks can be prevented — they are often weeks or months in the planning.
The keys to prevention are to spot the earliest behavioral signs that a student is struggling, Langman says, and also to watch for signs that someone may be veering toward violence.
Some signs can seem obvious in hindsight. “So, I’ve stopped being the kid who went to Boy Scouts, and church and loved his grandmother,” Van Dreal says, “and now I want to be that kid with camouflage who’s isolated and attacks people and hurts them.”
But sometimes, even professionals who see the signs miss their significance.
About a year and a half before he attacked students at Columbine High School, Dylan Klebold, who was a gifted student, started to get into trouble.
He and some friends hacked into his school’s computer system. Then, a couple of months later, he and his friend Eric Harris broke into a van and stole some equipment. They were arrested at that point and sent to a diversion program — an alternative to jail for first-time juvenile offenders — that offered counseling and required community service.
Sue Klebold , Dylan’s mother and subsequent author of the book A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy , tells NPR she was upset and concerned to see the sudden change in her son’s behavior. She says she asked the diversion counselor if his behavior meant something and whether he needed a therapist. The counselor asked Dylan, and Dylan said no.
Sue Klebold says she never realized how deep the problem was.
“The piece that I think I failed [in] is, we tend to underestimate the level of pain that someone may be in,” Klebold tells NPR. “We all have a responsibility to stop and think — someone we love may be suffering, may be in a crisis.”
Beware pitfalls in the search for a solution
The solution, according to psychologists who study kids who become violent, isn’t to expel or suspend a student like Dylan — though that is what happened to him in the fall of 1997, after he hacked into his school’s computer system.
A student like that who’s expelled “can now be bored, can be isolated at home, can be living in a dysfunctional family, and can be ruminating and thinking all the time about how he’s going to avenge what has happened to him,” says Meloy.
Eric Harris, who was Dylan Klebold’s friend and fellow killer that day at Columbine, didn’t seem depressed; he was self-absorbed, lacked empathy and was prone to angry outbursts, according to those who analyzed his journals and earlier behavior.
While Klebold’s journals were “full of loneliness and depression,” Langman says, the writings of Harris were “full of narcissism and rage and rants against people — a lot of contempt.”
Harris’ contempt extended to himself. Significant surgeries during his early teen years to correct a birth condition contributed to self-loathing, Langman’s study of Harris’ journal suggests.
“I have always hated how I looked,” Harris wrote in his journal. “That’s where a lot of my hate grows from.” In his last journal entry, Harris refers to himself as “the weird looking Eric KID.”
“Anyone contemplating getting a gun and killing people needs to be seen as a person in crisis,” says Langman. “And that’s why it’s so important to reach out and connect with that individual.”
Time and time again, psychologists and educators have found that surrounding a young person with the right kind of support and supervision early on can turn most away from violence.
Connecting with these students, listening to them and supporting them, getting them the help they need, these researchers say, can help prevent future attacks and make schools a safer place for all children.

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