Bloody Sunday: One former British soldier to be charged over Northern Ireland massacre | UK News | Sky News

Bloody Sunday: One former British soldier to be charged over Northern Ireland massacre | UK News | Sky News

One former British soldier is to be charged with the murders of two men and the attempted murders of four others over the Bloody Sunday shootings in Londonderry.
There was insufficient evidence to provide a reasonable prospect of conviction for the other 16 ex-soldiers, said Northern Ireland’s Public Prosecution Service.
Families and friends of the dead and injured said they were “disappointed” with the decision.
Listen to “Bloody Sunday: Families insist justice for one family is justice for all” on Spreaker. :: Add to Apple Podcasts , Google Podcasts , Spotify , Spreaker .
Prosecutors also considered files on two former members of the old “Official IRA” and said they would not face prosecution.
The veteran paratrooper – who can only be identified as soldier F – will face prosecution for the murders of James Wray and William McKinney and the attempted murders of Joseph Friel, Michael Quinn, Joe Mahon and Patrick O’Donnell.
Image: The soldier will be charged over the murders of James Wray (L) and William McKinney Thirteen people were killed and 15 others injured on 30 January 1972 when troops of the 1st Battalion of the Parachute Regiment fired on demonstrators during a civil rights march in Derry.
More from Northern Ireland The Troubles left a legacy like no other army deployment Bloody Sunday: 17 former British soldiers to find out whether they face charges Bloody Sunday: A ‘watershed’ in the history of the Troubles Northern Ireland: Allison Marimon-Herrera, 15, was strangled, police say Northern Ireland Secretary Karen Bradley admits there are ‘no excuses’ for her Troubles comments Hyde Park bomb suspect to be extradited to Northern Ireland over 1972 murders On Thursday, families gathered outside The Museum of Free Derry, close to where the killings took place 47 years ago, and marched together to the Guildhall in the city centre to hear the decision.
John Kelly, whose 17-year-old brother Michael was killed, said: “We have walked a long journey since our fathers and brothers were brutally slaughtered on the streets of Derry on Bloody Sunday.”
Image: Families of the victims say the campaign for justice is ‘not finished yet’ He said many had received a “terrible disappointment”, but welcomed the news of the prosecution for the families impacted by the decision to prosecute soldier F.
“Their victory is our victory,” he said.
The group expressed regret that over how the investigation was handled at the time, saying: “[This decision] does not mean that those soldiers acted in a dignified and appropriate way, it simply means that if these crimes had been investigated properly when they happened and the evidence gathered at the time then the outcome would be different.”
Image: The families of those killed or injured on Bloody Sunday said they were ‘disappointed’ They also called for the ex-soldier to be prosecuted to be named, saying “killers should not benefit from anonymity” and their campaign for justice was “not finished yet”.
Ciaran Shiels, a solicitor for a number of the relatives, said: “This is a remarkable achievement by the families and victims of Bloody Sunday.
“We are disappointed that not all of those responsible are to face trial.
“We will give detailed consideration to the reasons provided for decisions not to prosecute the other soldiers, with a view to making further submissions to the Prosecution Service and we shall ultimately challenge in the High Court, by way of judicial review, any prosecutorial decision that does not withstand scrutiny.”
Image: The Saville inquiry criticised the decision to send troops into the Bogside estate in vehicles During the 1972 shootings, an image of a Catholic priest waving a blood-stained handkerchief as he tried to help a victim to safety was seen around the world.
The troops were sent into the Bogside nationalist housing estate to deal with riots which followed the march defying a ban on public processions.
In 2010, a public inquiry under Lord Saville – ordered by former prime minister Tony Blair in 1998 – concluded the killings to have been “unjustified and unjustifiable”.
The investigation, which lasted 12 years and cost around £195m, dismissed suggestions those who were shot at had been armed with guns and nail bombs.
It also criticised the decision to send soldiers into the estate in vehicles.
Image: Thirteen people were killed by British soldiers on Bloody Sunday Papers before prosecutors included 668 witness statements and numerous photos, video and audio evidence.
Stephen Heron, Northern Ireland director of public prosecutions, said much of the material which was available for consideration was not admissible in criminal proceedings, due to the strict rules of evidence that apply.
He said he was aware it had been “a long road for the families to reach this point and today will be another extremely difficult day for many of them”.
Mr Heron stressed the decisions in no way undermined the findings of the Saville inquiry – that those shot were not posing a threat to the soldiers.
Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said the Ministry of Defence would support soldier F and pay the legal costs.
Image: The Saville inquiry dismissed suggestions the demonstrators were armed with weapons He said: “We are indebted to those soldiers who served with courage and distinction to bring peace to Northern Ireland.
“The welfare of our former service personnel is of the utmost importance… and the government will urgently reform the system for dealing with legacy issues. Our serving and former personnel cannot live in constant fear of prosecution.”
Founder of the Justice for Northern Ireland Veterans group Alan Barry said: “It’s one soldier too many as far as we’re concerned.
“It’s very one-sided. No soldier should be charged. It happened 47 years ago, a line in the sand needs to be drawn and people need to move on.
“Under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement veterans are being left open to prosecution while terrorists have been cleansed of their past crimes.”
Image: Victims’ families marched through the Bogside estate before the announcement The paratroopers involved were not identified by the Saville inquiry. They were known only by a sequence of letters.
The outcome of the inquiry opened up the possibility of criminal charges being made against the troops involved.
Then prime minister David Cameron also apologised to the families of the victims in a statement in the House of Commons.
An investigation by the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) followed the inquiry and files on 18 soldiers were submitted to prosecutors in 2016 and 2017 for consideration. One veteran has since died.
Four other soldiers included in the Saville report died before police had completed their investigation.

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Re: Duterte exposes 43 ‘narco politicians’ | Inquirer News

Rep. Jesus Celeste, 1st district, Pangasinan
Rep. Jeffrey Khonghun; 1st district, Zambales
Ferdinand Dancel Aguindaldo, Vice Mayor; Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte
Mayor Marjorie Salazar; Lasam, Cagayan
Mayor Jefferson Khonghun; Subic, Zambales
Mayor Erlon Agustin; Camiling, Tarlac
Mayor Cipriano Violago Jr.; San Rafael, Bulacan ADVERTISEMENT
Mayor Larry Alilio; Lemery, Batangas
Mayor Raul Palino; Teresa, Rizal,
Mayor Illiong Hernandez; Rodriguez, Rizal
Mayor Loreto Amante; San Pablo, Laguna
Mayor Juan Toreja; Ibaan, Batangas
Mayor Roderick Alcala Lucena City, Quezon
“For the time being ito lang muna. Kasi validated na e. Yung iba I just want to be doble sure I’m not really interested in releasing it before and after the election because I do not have the slightest intention to hurt anybody or to be a cause of a failure of election of a certain man who wants to serve the public wala akong ano so yung iba wag na muna kasi hindi ko sigurado e,” Duterte said in the televised briefing in Davao City.
INQUIRER.net is contacting these politicians to get their side. / gsg Read Next

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Police Searching For Missing Brookline Teen

4:00 PM KDKA-TV News at 4 5:00 PM KDKA-TV News at 5 6:00 PM KDKA-TV News at 6 7:00 PM CBS Evening News with Jeff Glor Police Find Missing Brookline Teen March 13, 2019 at 11:59 pm
Follow KDKA-TV : Facebook | Twitter
PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – The Pittsburgh Police located a missing teenage boy on Wednesday.
Julian Duffy, 16, of Brookline, was reported missing Wednesday evening but was found, according to an update on the Pittsburgh police facebook page.

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China blocks effort at UN to ban Jaish chief Masood Azhar for 4th time | India News

NEW DELHI/WASHINGTON: China yet again put on hold a proposal at the UN for a ban on Jaish-e-Muhammed (JeM) chief Masood Azhar , bringing to a halt a renewed push by France, US and UK to blacklist the Pakistan-based terrorist after the Pulwama attack.
China has thrice earlier put the same proposal on a ‘technical hold’ before finally terminating the proposal. The hold can last up to a maximum of nine months, after which China can again use its veto power to formally block, or terminate, the proposal.
The Indian government said it was disappointed by the outcome. “This has prevented action by the international community to designate the leader of Jaish-e-Muhammed, a proscribed and active terrorist organization which has claimed responsibility for the terrorist attack in J&K on February 14, 2019,” it said in a statement.
“The ISIL (Da’esh) and al-Qaida sanctions committee (1267 Sanctions Committee), upon completion of the no-objection period on March 13, 2019, was not able to come to a decision on the proposal for listing Mohammed Masood Azhar Alvi under the UN Sanctions regime, on account of a member placing the proposal on hold,” it added.
The government said it was grateful for the efforts of the member states who moved the designation proposal. “We will continue to pursue all available avenues to ensure that terrorist leaders who are involved in heinous attacks on our citizens are brought to justice,” it said.
But behind vague inanities was the hard realism of standing by Pakistan, an ally that has attracted global opprobrium for hosting terrorists, many of whom could pose a threat to Chinese economic interests in Pakistan should Beijing agree to lift its objection to designating them as global terrorists. In effect, China is seen as buying protection for its investments in Pakistan even at the risk of global shaming.
China was the only UNSC member to object to the proposal. India said it was grateful to Member States who moved the proposal and the unprecedented number of UNSC members as well as non-members who joined as co-sponsors.
Big,Small & Many… 1 big state holds up, again … 1 small signal @UN against terror Grateful to the many states… https://t.co/g0UoaNyJIF
— Syed Akbaruddin (@AkbaruddinIndia) 1552501464000
“We will continue to pursue all available avenues to ensure that terrorist leaders who are involved in heinous attacks on our citizens are brought to justice,” it said.
China had in the past blocked the same proposal in 2011, 2016 and again in 2017. Government sources here said the latest ‘hold’ was another sign of China’s “double standards” on terrorism.
This was the first time that the proposal for a UN ban on Azhar came within weeks of a major terror strike. China’s decision on this occasion will rankle with India a lot more as it comes within a year of the Xi-Modi summit in Wuhan which was said to have taken the bilateral relationship to another level altogether. Both countries had cited the “Wuhan spirit” to repeatedly claim that ties had been completely transformed since the Doklam standoff. Chinese ambassador to India Luo Zhaohui said last year that the relationship was passing through one of the best phases in history.
Like in the past, China communicated its decision to put on hold the ban an hour or so before the expiry of the deadline for raising objection. There was no proposal for a UN ban on Azhar last year as India sought to improve ties with China in the aftermath of the Doklam standoff. The Pulwama attack by JeM though changed all that, bringing ties under strain as Azhar continues to head the terror organisation and inspire attacks on India.
With US not sure of support from China, France took the lead in introducing another proposal for proscribing Azhar. The US and UK too backed the proposal and worked to mobilise support for it.
“The United States and China share a mutual interest in achieving regional stability and peace, and that a failure to designate Azhar would run counter to this goal,” a US State Department spokesperson said Tuesday.
Within an hour of the outcome, the hashtags #ChinaBacksTerror and #BoycottChina were trending on Twitter. Calls to boycott Chinese goods have periodically surfaced on social media, and Beijing’s intransigence in backing Pakistani terrorists is expected to further fire up this demand. India imports about $ 55 billion worth of goods and products from China.

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Another costly federal IT glitch gets resolved – ten years later | CBC News

Another costly federal IT glitch gets resolved – ten years later Social Sharing Another costly federal IT glitch gets resolved – ten years later The computer system that manages CPP payments was upgraded in 2009 – with one major flaw. An IT glitch prevented the government from chasing down people who owed $66 million in overpaid benefits. The problem has been fixed – a decade later – and some 15,000 people are again on the hook. Social Sharing About $66 million in CPP debt owed to Ottawa has gone uncollected because of a technical bug Dean Beeby The federal government has finally fixed a 10-year-old computer glitch and is again chasing down people who owe $66 million in Canada Pension Plan overpayments.(CBC)
A computer glitch dating back to 2009 has been fixed at last, allowing the federal government to resume chasing down thousands of Canadians who owe the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) about $66 million due to erroneous overpayments.
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) reinstated the collection of these old debts last November, going after 15,000 individuals or their estates after almost a decade of inaction.
“[T]he collection of debts on inactive accounts receivable stopped due to systems-related issues following the implementation of a new IT platform in 2009, which prevented an accurate determination of amounts owing,” says an Oct. 4 memo for Families, Children and Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos.
“ESDC has resolved these issues and will reinstate the collection of debts …”
A parallel technical glitch is also preventing the collection of Old Age Security (OAS) overpayments on inactive accounts, something which the department is still working to resolve. Dormant debt debacle
CBC News obtained the memo and other information about the dormant debt problem through the Access to Information Act.
ESDC currently claws back CPP and OAS overpayments for individuals who are still receiving their monthly benefits. In 2016, for example, the department recovered about $134 million of the $233 million in outstanding overpayments.
But since 2005, the department has left to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) the job of collecting overpayments that were made to people who are no longer receiving any benefit cheques — the so-called “inactive” accounts. Once all of the system issues have been resolved, collection will begin … – ESDC spokesperson, on plans to resume collections of Old Age Security overpayments after technical glitches prevented any activity
Some of these people improperly received CPP disability benefits or children’s benefits under the program — and some estates continued to cash cheques even after the intended recipients had died.
After 2009, the CRA was unable to collect anything — and could no longer accurately calculate the amounts owed — because the department had migrated its CPP system to a new IT platform.
Most of the 15,000 people who still owe the government CPP money received a notice in the mail over the last two years about their debt, but there’s been no active collection — until now.
ESDC estimates that 95 per cent of the individuals owe less than $25,000 each, and most owe less than $5,000. Magali Picard, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada, leads a protest on the three-year anniversary of the launch of the Phoenix pay system on Laurier Avenue in Ottawa on Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)
The department says it has an “undue hardship” policy to deal with people in financial difficulty, and can arrange to spread out payments over a longer term.
The newly resumed collections, which are being phased in, will ensure “equity” with other Canadians who paid back government benefits they weren’t supposed to get, says the memo.
A spokesperson for the department, Josh Bueckert, said the first wave of fresh collection notices has reached 1,730 people since November, and 266 of those notices resulted in repayments worth just over half a million dollars. No date provided
Bueckert did not offer a date for the resumption of debt collection for OAS overpayments in inactive accounts.
“Once all of the system issues have been resolved, collection will begin in a similar way [to how] CPP inactive accounts are being collected,” he said in an email.
The long-unresolved IT glitch is one of many that have dogged the federal government for years. The Phoenix payroll system fiasco, which started in 2016, continues to leave thousands of public servants overpaid, underpaid or not paid at all.
CBC News recently reported on internal government documents indicating it may take a decade to achieve “overall stability” for the Phoenix system.
Follow @DeanBeeby on Twitter Dean Beeby Senior reporter, Parliamentary Bureau Dean Beeby is a CBC journalist, author and specialist in freedom-of-information laws. Follow him on Twitter: @DeanBeeby

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