Lori Loughlin in FBI custody, to face college bribery scandal charges in court – Fox News

Lori Loughlin in FBI custody, to face college bribery scandal charges in court – Fox News

As part of her bond arrangement, the 54-year-old is being permitted to travel within the continental U.S. as well as British Columbia, where she is currently filming. She will have to surrender her passport in November when her projects are expected to wrap. Loughlin is prohibited from speaking to anyone related to the case with the exception of her famed fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli – who is also a defendant in the case – along with both of her daughters who “could be witnesses.”
Designer Mossimo Giannulli and wife Lori Loughlin in April 2015. (Getty, File)
Earlier on Wednesday, Loughlin was taken into custody in connection with the scheme in which wealthy parents allegedly paid bribes to get their children admitted into top colleges.
A rep for Loughlin told Fox News she had “no information regarding her client.” The actress' attorney did not respond to our multiple requests for comment.
On Tuesday, Giannulli appeared in court and was released on $1 million bond, secured by the couple's home. The judge ordered that Giannulli restrict his travel to the continental United States and surrender his passport.
Lori Loughlin, left, appears in this court sketch at the U.S. federal courthouse in downtown Los Angeles, Calif. on March 13, 2019. (REUTERS/Mona Shafer Edwards)
Loughlin did not appear in court on Tuesday because she was filming a movie in Vancouver at the time of Giannulli's arrest. According to multiple reports, the actress landed at LAX on Tuesday during her husband's court hearing.
Federal law enforcement officials went to Loughlin’s home in Los Angeles on Tuesday and discovered she was out of the country, according to TMZ. She faces charges of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud, according to a criminal complaint .
Fellow actress Felicity Huffman , an Academy Award nominee, was arrested at her home Tuesday for her alleged involvement in the scheme. She appeared in Los Angeles federal court Tuesday looking visibly tired before posting $250,000 bail and surrendering her passport.
Video Loughlin and Giannulli are accused of agreeing to pay $500,000 in bribes to have their two daughters designated as recruits for the University of Southern California crew team despite that fact that neither child participated in the sport. Their daughter, famous YouTube star Olivia Jade, attends USC. It was not clear if their other daughter, Isabella, has attended the university.
Loughlin, Giannulli and Huffman are all ordered to appear in federal court in Boston on March 29 for a preliminary hearing.
More than four dozen people have been charged in the nationwide scam, which is alleged to have placed students in top-tier schools like Yale, Georgetown, Stanford, the University of Southern California, UCLA and the University of Texas. A federal investigation into the matter – dubbed “Operation Varsity Blues” – has been ongoing for more than a year.
Loughlin became famous as the wholesome Aunt Becky in the 1980s and '90s sitcom “Full House.” She more recently has become the queen of the Hallmark channel with her holiday movies and the series “When Calls the Heart.”
Fox News’ Louis Casiano and Jennifer Girdon contributed to this report.
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Extreme weather set to see Australia’s insurance red zones expand – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

*Combines hot days, sea level and rainfall
Such figures are critical for understanding where future risk zones will expand, Dr Mallon says.
Take flood risk in Townsville, for instance. Insurers typically use the one-in-100-year flood zone to set the boundaries of high risk, Dr Mallon says. But by the end of the century, the risk of a one-in-100-year flood will have increased by about 130 per cent, according to Climate Risk’s own estimates.
“If you build a house now, by the end of its operational life that risk will have significantly more than doubled … So what used to be the one-in-200-year flood zone is the new one-in-100-year zone,” Dr Mallon says.
“These are the properties that will become uninsurable.”
Climate Risk has analysed how the expansion of these high-risk zones will impact the number of “uninsurable” homes in Australia.
Its provisional figures estimate that by 2100 the number of “uninsurable” homes — defined as those where the annual premium would exceed one per cent of the property value — will swell to upwards of 850,000 or nearly 10 per cent of residential properties. This is about 220,000 morethan in 2018.
The problem affects far more homes than most people realise because planning laws haven’t kept pace with climate change, Dr Mallon says. We are still building, buying and selling “the wrong kinds of buildings in the wrong kinds of places … A lot of people are sleepwalking into [this]”. How common is extreme weather in your region?
The interactive tool (below) shows how the frequency of different weather extremes has changed for your region. It’s based on a chart like the one above.
The long-term average is represented by a black circle.
Each animated line represents a year. The further it stretches outside the circle, the more frequent the extremes that season. The deeper inside the circle, the less frequent the extremes.
Again, the exception is extreme cold where risk increases with fewer cold days.
Enter your postcode to find your region. Scroll down and select from the smaller charts to compare different types of extreme weather.
This feature is unavailable on the ABC App. Go to the web version via the link above or swipe down to keep reading. ‘Dangerous market failure’
Increased intensity and frequency of extreme weather doesn’t necessarily mean more expensive losses, Mr Sullivan says.
“We can change the built environment to make less brittle homes … And we can build mitigation around existing townships. There’s plenty of evidence to show that when you build it, insurance prices tumble as a result.”
However, he concedes that the industry is no longer heavily involved in setting building codes and if nothing is done to cap the risk “then yes, [premiums] will become far more expensive and you could get to a point where it becomes unaffordable for the average person.”
We’ve arguably passed that point, Mr Andrews says, with flood premiums for people in risk zones already priced out of reach.
“While insurers will offer them cover, most people don’t take it up, so … if it’s not an insurability problem, it’s certainly an affordability problem,” he says.
Regardless of how its framed, the consequences stretch far beyond those currently living in high-risk areas, Dr Mallon warns. Photo: Sea levels have risen faster in Queensland than the south coast of Western Australia. (By Emma Wynne)
“We see a particularly dangerous market failure,” he says.
The cornerstone of that failure, he says, is that insurers can effectively abandon policies or areas from one year to the next if they decide the risk has become too severe.
Because all prospective homeowners need insurance to secure a mortgage, this creates a ripple effect.
“Once insurance becomes very expensive or unavailable it becomes very difficult to sell that house because the next person can’t get proper insurance to get their mortgage,” Dr Mallon says.
“So the effects of insurance becoming unavailable are potentially catastrophic for areas which are exposed to current or future extreme weather.”
Rather than refusing cover or hiking up premiums, insurers should take an active role in helping communities mitigate against climate-related risk, Dr Mallon says.
“They should be … saying to people, ‘We can’t provide cover for your house for, say, flood risk, unless you do something like raise it up or put flood defences around it’, or what have you.”
He also wants insurers to be more transparent about how long they think they can provide a policy.
“If you’re taking on a mortgage, you want to know that you’ve got an insurer over the life of that mortgage,” Dr Mallon says. “You really want 30 years of foresight — and the analytics for that are available.”
But while the industry can continue to influence the debate on how to build appropriately for locations prone to extreme weather, Mr Sullivan insists price remains an important tool.
“We’re not in there in regulation. Nobody needs to consult us … but we are sending a price signal and that’s sending its own line of thought and thinking to the community.” Credits

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Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel peace prize | World news | The Guardian

Climate strike founder shortlisted ahead of global strikes planned in more than 105 countries

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Brexit vote latest news: Theresa May facing Commons defeat after Brexiteers and DUP reject her deal

Brexiteers and the DUP have rejected Theresa May’s deal as Geoffrey Cox warned the UK could be trapped in backstop indefinitely, despite changes secured by Theresa May from Brussels last night.”> <meta name="DCSext.MLC" content=

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Greenpeace Co-Founder: ‘Climate Crisis Is Not Only Fake News. It’s Fake Science’

Greenpeace Co-Founder: ‘Climate Crisis Is Not Only Fake News. It’s Fake Science’ 10:31 AM 03/12/2019 | Politics David Krayden | Ottawa Bureau Chief share on facebook tweet this show comments Share Print Reddit Share Share Article via Email To Your first name Message Send WhatsApp Co-founder of environmental organization Greenpeace Patrick Moore said Tuesday that the climate change crisis driving much of liberal politics today “is not only fake news. It’s fake science.”
Moore also wondered during his appearance on “ Fox & Friends ” why people would be worried about global warming: “A little bit of warming would not be a bad thing, for myself being Canadian.”
Greenpeace Co-Founder Patrick Moore appears on Fox & Friends to discuss “climate change crisis,” on March 12, 2019. Fox News screenshot.
Moore bounced back into the climate change debate last week in an online feud with New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez after he blasted her Green New Deal for being not ambitious but ridiculous. (RELATED: Report: Rep. Ocasio-Cortez Has Violated Her Own Green New Deal)
Watch the latest video at foxnews.com “Well, it’s a silly plan; that’s why I suggested she was a pompous little twit, twit meaning silly in the British lexicon,” Moore told Fox, adding, “She really rubbed me the wrong way when she said she’s ‘the boss ’ because she can make up a proposal that’s completely ridiculous, and nobody else did.”
Moore, who now sits as a director on the CO2 Coalition , a group of American and Canadian scientists who refute man-made climate change, says carbon dioxide is “the main building block of all life” and that it is good for the environment. “There is nothing to be afraid of.”
US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat of New York … (Photo: read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
He doesn’t deny climate change. “Of course climate change is real: it’s been happening since the beginning of time but it’s not dangerous and it’s not created by people … a completely natural phenomenon.”
Moore questioned why so many scientists who promote a climate change crisis receive “perpetual government grants,” insist “the science is settled and say people like myself should just shut up. On the other hand, they keep studying it forever as if there’s something new to find out.”
The former Greenpeace director says the organization has been “hijacked by the extreme left.” (RELATED: Greenpeace Admits Anti-Logging Campaign Is Based On ‘Subjective Opinion’)
Getting back to the Green New Deal, Moore insisted the plan is a recipe for catastrophe: “You cannot do agriculture for 8 billion people, produce the food for 8 billion people without fossil fuels.”
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