Nigeria school collapse: Fears of trapped children in Lagos – BBC News

Nigeria school collapse: Fears of trapped children in Lagos – BBC News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Deaths confirmed in Lagos school collapse At least 10 people have died and many more are feared trapped after a building containing a school collapsed in the Nigerian city of Lagos.
The school, which was on the top floor of the four-storey building in Ita Faji on Lagos Island, had more than 100 pupils, a rescue official told the BBC.
About 40 pupils had been pulled out alive, the official said.
The building had been identified as “distressed” and listed for demolition, Lagos building officials told the BBC.
The collapse happened at about 10:00 local time (09:00 GMT). There were frantic scenes at the site as rescuers and local men searched for survivors, and family members crowded the area in the hope of finding their loved ones alive.
Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Eyewitness says “everybody had to run for their lives” The collapsed building was a residential block containing a number of apartments as well as the school, residents and rescue officials at the scene told the BBC.
Emergency teams pulled several injured pupils from the rubble, but many worried parents at the scene were unable to find their children, while others went to a local hospital to look for theirs.
Image copyright Reuters Image caption It Is not clear how many children remain trapped Men from the local area were assisting rescuers but large crowds of people were hindering the rescue operation.
Mohammed Muftau, a local resident who witnessed the collapse, told the BBC that the building had been cracking for long time and that complaints had been raised about it.
The Lagos State Building Control Agency confirmed to the BBC that the building had been marked and listed for demolition. It is not unusual for buildings to collapse in Nigeria; materials are often sub-standard and the enforcement of regulations is lax.
In September 2014, 116 people died when a six-storey building collapsed in Lagos during a service given by a celebrity televangelist. And in 2016, more than 100 people died when the roof of a church in Uyo, in the south of Nigeria, caved in.
Image copyright Reuters Image caption Rescuers were working frantically to free those trapped under the rubble At the Lagos Island General Hospital, there was a scene of chaos as parents and family members scrambled after every ambulance that arrived to see if it contained a loved one. Many of the victims brought in were children in school uniforms.
Visiting the hospital, the Lagos state deputy governor, Idiat Oluranti Adebule, offered condolences to the families of the victims and called for calm.
“We plead for their understanding to allow the rescue team to do their work… so that the medical team can take prompt and immediate action as soon as the patients are brought in,” she told the BBC.
President Muhammadu Buhari offered his condolences to the families of the victims.
“It touches one to lose precious lives in any kind of mishap, particularly those so young and tender,” he said. “May God grant everyone affected by this sad incident fortitude and succour.”

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Duterte to Roxas: You’re nothing, I can shoot you for free | Inquirer News

President Rodrigo Duterte and former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas (File photos from Philippine Daily Inquirer)
MANILA, Philippines — “You are nothing to me. I can even shoot you for free.”
President Rodrigo Duterte directed this statement on Wednesday to former Interior Secretary Manuel “Mar” Roxas II, who is senatorial aspirant running in the Otso Diretso opposition slate in the May 2019 elections. ADVERTISEMENT
Speaking at PDP-Laban’s campaign rally in Isabela province, Duterte said his 2016 presidential elections rival had no loyalty, having served in both the Arroyo and Aquino administrations.
“Just because you are a namesake of a Roxas eh mahusay ka. Itong tao na’to walang loyalty ito. Panahon ni [President Gloria] Arroyo, nandiyan siya. Panahon ni [President Benigno] Aquino [III], nandun siya. Wala ito. Pretends to be somebody. Tao na walang prinsipyo,” he said. FEATURED STORIES NEWSINFO US immigration agency to close international office in PH, other countries NEWSINFO Hunt on for 3 men behind skinning, slay of Cebu student NEWSINFO Saudia flight returns to airport after passenger forgets baby at terminal
[Just because you are a namesake of Roxas doesn’t mean you’re good. This person has no loyalty. In the time of Arroyo, he was there. In the time of Aquino, he was there. He’s nothing. Pretends to be somebody. He’s a person without principles.]
Actually, Roxas, a grandson of post-World War II President Manuel Roxas, was first appointed to head the Department of Trade and Industry in 2000 by then President Joseph Estrada.
In January 2001, when Estrada was ousted by the so-called Edsa Dos, then President Arroyo reappointed him to the same position.
Then he served as chief of the Department of Transportation and Communications (now simply the Department of Transportation), from July 2011 to October 2012 under the Arroyo administration.
President Aquino then appointed him as chief of the Department of the Interior and Local Government to replace Jesse Robredo, who had died in a plane crash. He headed the DILG from September 2012 to September 2015.
Just last week, President Duterte also ridiculed Roxas, saying he should just a traffic aide, in reference to a viral video showing the latter directing traffic.
READ: Duterte: Mar Roxas should just be a traffic aide ADVERTISEMENT
In the same speech, the President also took time to poke fun of the Otso Diretso candidates, who he said had done nothing but to criticize his administration. /atm
Click here for more elections stories.
Read Next Malaysia Airlines could be sold or shut down — PM Mahathir LATEST STORIES No pushovers: NU Lady Bulldogs prove they’re more than just a bunch of rookies Paul Lee says Hotshots should be ready for Gin Kings Duterte to Reds: Comply with my terms for peace talks to resume Sandiganbayan erred in denying businessman’s travel request — SC MOST READ Duterte to Roxas: You’re nothing; I can shoot you for free Cebu teenager’s slay: Precise mutilation shocks, baffles authorities Kris posts photos with Nicko on IG: ‘Just in case you miss me’ Malaysia Airlines could be sold or shut down — PM Mahathir Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

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Boeing wants suspension of ‘entire global fleet’ of 737 MAX | News

Aviation Boeing supports suspension of ‘entire global fleet’ of 737 MAX Flight ban ordered by President Trump as new evidence emerges at Ethiopia crash site along with satellite data. 14 Mar 2019 07:36 GMT The United States has grounded Boeing’s 737 MAX aircraft over safety fears, days after other countries halted use of the plane after an Ethiopian Airlines crash killed all 157 people on board. The US was one of the last countries to shut down the Boeing model after two deadly downings in six months, dozens of nations had made the move soon after the Ethiopia disaster. Meanwhile, Boeing – facing its worst crisis in years – recommended a temporary suspension of the “entire global fleet” of the 737 MAX aircraft on Wednesday.
“We are supporting this proactive step out of an abundance of caution,” said Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing’s president, CEO and chairman in a statement on the company’s website.
“We are doing everything we can to understand the cause of the accidents in partnership with the investigators, deploy safety enhancements and help ensure this does not happen again.”
The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ordered the temporary grounding of all 737 MAX aircraft operated by US airlines or in US airspace. Ethiopia airlines crash: Families of victims visit site (3:06)
It said the decision was based on new evidence gathered at the Ethiopia Airlines crash site, near the capital Addis Ababa, as well as “newly refined satellite data”.
“The agency made this decision as a result of the data gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analysed today,” the FAA said in a statement. Emergency order
The grounding was welcomed by aviation workers in the US.
John Samuelsen, international president of the Transport Workers Union of America, which represents aviation workers and flight attendants, said the grounding of the fleet was right “both for air travellers and aviation workers”.
The FAA’s move came minutes after US President Donald Trump issued an emergency order for the grounding of all Boeing 737 MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft in the country.
“I didn’t want to take any chances,” said Trump. “We could have delayed it. We maybe didn’t have to make it at all. But I felt it was important both psychologically and in a lot of other ways.
“The safety of the American people, of all people, is our paramount concern.” Software fix
Sunday’s Ethiopian Airlines crash was the second accident involving the US-based aerospace giant’s MAX 8 model within six months.
Last October, a Lion Air-operated MAX 8 went down in Indonesia, killing 189 people .
Both crashes took place shortly after takeoff and have prompted intense scrutiny of the plane’s control systems.
New information from the wreckage in Ethiopia and newly refined data about the plane’s flight path indicated some similarities between the two disasters “that warrant further investigation of the possibility of a shared cause”, the FAA statement said.
Acting administrator of the FAA, Daniel Elwell, said he did not know how long the US grounding of the aircraft would last. A software fix for the 737 MAX that Boeing has been working on since the Indonesia crash will take months to complete, Elwell told reporters.
Dozens of nations banned the use of 737 MAX models in their airspace immediately after the Ethiopia crash, but for days the US continued to say that was unneccesary.
American lawmakers are now questioning why it took so long for the Trump administration and the FAA to take similar action.
Shares in Boeing fell precipitously on Wednesday, plunging by nearly three percent and putting the stock down more than 13 percent since before Sunday’s crash.
The downturn has wiped billions off the company’s market value.
The single-aisle 737 is central to Boeing’s future in its battle with European rival Airbus SE. The new variant of the 737, the fastest-selling jetliner in Boeing’s history, is viewed as the likely workhorse for global airlines for decades. How safe is Boeing’s 737 MAX 8 aircraft?
SOURCE: Al Jazeera and news agencies

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Frank Cali, Gambino family Mafia boss, shot dead in New York – BBC News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Police at the scene of the shooting in Staten Island The reputed head of New York’s Gambino crime family, Frank Cali, has been killed outside his home, say the city’s police.
Cali, 53, was shot several times in the Todt Hill district of Staten Island on Wednesday evening and died later in hospital.
The unidentified killer fled the scene in a blue car, witnesses said.
New York media say it is the first targeted killing of a mob boss in the city since 1985.
The Gambino operation is said to be one of the five historic Italian-US mafia families in New York.
New York Mafia: What’s happening to the Five Families? Extortion and omerta: The mafia where it all began Police said Cali’s killer shot him at least six times and then ran him over before fleeing the scene. Family members were seen to rush into the street and sit crying next to his body.
The motive was not known, according to police.
“There are no arrests and the investigation is ongoing,” a statement said.
Image copyright AFP Image caption A 2008 image of Frank Cali given out by Italian police NYPD Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea said in a news conference on Thursday that Cali may have been lured outside the home by a car accident before he was attacked.
Detective Shea said his Cadillac SUV, which was parked outside the home, was struck leading to Cali to rush outside.
After a minute-long conversation, the assassin pulled out a gun and opened fire on him, police say.
“Needless to say, with the potential organised crime angle, it gets the utmost importance [of] the NYPD and the entire detective bureau,” the detective said, adding that video exists of the attack.
First ‘mob hit’ since 1985 New York media say it is the first killing of a family boss in the city since the Gambino family’s Paul Castellano was shot dead outside a restaurant in 1985 on the orders of John Gotti.
What happened to crime in New York City? The secret lives of Sicily’s Mafia hunters Gotti then ran the Gambino family until he was convicted in 1992 of racketeering and five counts of murder. He died in prison in 2002.
The Gambino family was once considered the biggest organised crime group in the US, but began to decline after Gotti and other senior figures were jailed.
Image copyright CBS Francesco “Franky Boy” Cali is said to have taken over the running of the organisation from Domenico Cefalu in 2015.
It is believed he only had one criminal conviction, for conspiring to extort money in 2008 for which he served 16 months in prison.
Staten Island’s affluent Todt Hill neighbourhood is renowned for its crime connections. It was used as the location for fictional crime boss Don Corleone’s compound in the 1972 film The Godfather. Paul Castellano also owned a home there.
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption This house in Todt Hill was the setting for the Corleone family residence in the film The Godfather Neighbours Will and Karen Curitore told CBS News the neighbourhood always seemed safe to them.
“We know there used to be a mob presence here,” said Mr Curitore.
“We thought this was one of the safer neighbourhoods on Staten Island.”
“I guess unless you’re in the mafia,” Mrs Curitore added.
The Genovese, Gambino, Lucchese, Colombo and Bonanno mafia families are believed to have controlled organised crime in New York for decades.
Last week, Carmine Persico, the 85-year-old former boss of the Colombo organisation, died after serving 33 years of a 139-year prison sentence.
On Wednesday, two heads of the Bonanno family, Joseph Cammarano Jr and John Zancocchio, were acquitted in a Manhattan court of racketeering and conspiracy to commit extortion.
Last October, 71-year-old Sylvester Zottola, a reputed associate of the Bonanno organisation, was shot dead at a takeaway restaurant in the Bronx, New York. The attack came three months after Zottola’s son, Salvatore Zottola, was also shot, but survived.

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Purdue Pharma And Other Drug Companies Fight Opioid Disclosure : Shots – Health News : NPR

“What’s important to me is that the facts come to light, and we get justice and accountability,” Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said about litigation that has made internal Purdue Pharma documents public. Drew Angerer/Getty Images Drew Angerer/Getty Images “What’s important to me is that the facts come to light, and we get justice and accountability,” Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said about litigation that has made internal Purdue Pharma documents public. Drew Angerer/Getty Images
America’s big drugmakers and pharmacy chains are scrambling to respond to hundreds of lawsuits tied to the deadly opioid epidemic. Billions of dollars are at stake if the companies are found liable for fueling the crisis.
Even before judgments are rendered, companies like Purdue Pharma, Johnson & Johnson and CVS are already suffering damage to their reputations as evidence in civil suits reveals more about their internal workings.
“The narrative is clearly shifting on this story,” said David Armstrong , a senior reporter with ProPublica, who has covered the drug industry for years. “People want some sort of reckoning, some sort of accounting.”
One reason for the shift is that cities and states filing these suits are moving more aggressively to pull back the curtain on the drug industry’s practices, urging courts to make internal memos, marketing strategies and reams of other documents public.
“Our next battle is to get the depositions and the documents that are being produced made available to the public, instead of everything being filed under confidentiality agreements,” said Joe Rice, one of the lead attorneys bringing lawsuits against drug companies on behalf of local governments in Ohio.
A growing number of documents have already been released or leaked to the press, and many of the revelations they contain have been troubling. In internal memos, Purdue executives acknowledged that their prescription opioids are far more addictive and dangerous than the company was telling doctors. At the same time, company directives pushed sales representatives to get even more opioids into the hands of vulnerable people , including seniors and veterans. Lawsuit Details How The Sackler Family Allegedly Built An OxyContin Fortune
Memos also show that Purdue executives developed a secret plan, never implemented, called Project Tango in which they acknowledged the escalating risk of the opioid epidemic. The program was allegedly designed to help Purdue profit from the growing wave of opioid dependency by selling the company’s addiction treatment services to people hooked on products like its own OxyContin.
This increased transparency represents a big shift in the way opioid lawsuits are being handled. “We’ve done something that hasn’t been done before,” said Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey, who appeared in February on NPR and WBUR’s program On Point .
Massachusetts is suing Purdue, like dozens of other states, and Healey fought successfully to make all the documents her office had uncovered public, without redactions. “What Purdue’s own documents show is the extent of deception and deceit. What’s important to me is that the facts come to light, and we get justice and accountability,” Healey said.
Purdue Pharma declined to speak with NPR, but the drug industry has fought these disclosures at every turn. They describe the information in these documents as proprietary, asserting that it should be viewed by the courts as corporate property. For years, governments pursuing these cases mostly went along with those arguments.
In past opioid settlements, companies paid fines but insisted on gag orders. “The way it usually works is the language in the settlement requires either that the records be destroyed very quickly after the settlement or that they physically actually return the records to the drug company,” said ProPublica’s Armstrong.
That happened in 2007 when the Justice Department ended a criminal case against Purdue Pharma. It happened again a few years ago when the state of Kentucky settled a civil case with the company and that state’s attorney general destroyed thousands of pages of documents. As a result, few people in the wider public knew how serious the allegations were.
As more information has been revealed, it’s sparking fury. At a February hearing on Capitol Hill, Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., blasted industry executives. “Companies like Janssen and Purdue Pharma fueled this epidemic, employing deceptive and truly unconscionable marketing tactics despite the known risk, so you could sell more drugs to maximize your profits,” she said.
Jennifer Taubert heads the Janssen Pharmaceuticals unit of Johnson & Johnson, which makes and sells opioids. The company faces escalating lawsuits over its products, but Taubert denied any wrongdoing at the hearing. “Everything that we have done with our products when we’ve promoted opioid products, which we stopped marketing a long time ago, was appropriate and responsible,” she told lawmakers.
Yet according to the drug companies’ internal documents, firms including Johnson & Johnson pushed unscientific theories about drug addiction . They allegedly did so as part of an effort to persuade doctors to prescribe even more opioids after patients showed signs of dependency.
This kind of industry backlash has happened before, such as when tobacco companies faced lawsuits in the 1990s. As those trials unfolded, the public learned for the first time about widespread corporate wrongdoing. Pharmaceutical Company CEOs Face Grilling In Senate Over High Drug Prices
The difference here is that drug companies and their researchers have been seen by many in the public as healers and innovators, part of a trusted health care system.
There could be more revelations. With another big opioid trial set to begin in May in Oklahoma state court , attorneys are still fighting over millions of pages of documents, most of which the public has still never seen.
One possibility is that companies could agree to what is known as a global settlement of these opioid cases, paying billions of dollars in compensation in hopes of winning new secrecy agreements.
If that happens, says ProPublica’s Armstrong, documents that help tell the full story of this drug epidemic could be destroyed or locked away for years. “I worry that we’re going to lose all this valuable information about how we got to this point with this crisis, who knew what when,” he said.

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