Study: Fox News Is Obsessed with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Study: Fox News Is Obsessed with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Study: Fox News Is Obsessed with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s name is on the lips of nearly everyone at Fox News. Friday Saturday
NEW YORK (AP) — Freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s name is on the lips of nearly everyone at Fox News.
A study found that the New York City Democrat was mentioned 3,181 times on Fox News Channel and its sister Fox Business Network during the six-week period of Feb. 25 to April 7, or just under 76 times a day. Not a day went by when she wasn’t spoken about on Fox.
The liberal watchdog Media Matters for America, which did the research, called it an obsession and said the first term representative has become the network’s latest bogeyman, “someone for hosts and guests to demonize, knock down and refer to whenever grievances need to be aired against the Democratic Party.”
Media Matters for America did not analyze other news shows for this report. Its mission is to monitor conservative news in the U.S. media.
Fox has talked about Ocasio-Cortez’s advocacy for a Green New Deal, called her a hypocrite for using cars and has fed off her social media pronouncements. Fox’s Sean Hannity called her “the real speaker of the House,” instead of Nancy Pelosi.
Tucker Carlson has called her an “idiot wind bag,” a “pompous little twit,” a “fake revolutionary,” ″self-involved and dumb,” a “moron and nasty and more self-righteous than any televangelist.”
Fox personalities like Carlson and Jeanine Pirro have called her “a bartender,” in reference to a pre-politics job. There are also derogatory allusions to her youth, like when commentator Brit Hume said that “she’s kind of adorable in sort of the way that a 5-year-old child can be adorable,” according to the research.
Asked for comment on Saturday, a Fox spokeswoman noted that Ocasio-Cortez, 29, has received plenty of media attention elsewhere, including prominent features in Time magazine, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and the Hollywood Reporter. Fox’s Laura Ingraham — who did a segment during the six-week period questioning whether Ocasio-Cortez would have to go to jail because of an aide’s alleged campaign finance violations — has invited her on her show and said she admired her political rise.
The congresswoman tweeted a link to the Media Matters research, adding the comment, “that’s how hard they’re fighting against dignified health care, wages and justice for all; and turning their fire power on the youngest congressional woman in history to do it.
“Too bad for them, because we don’t flinch,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote.
Beyond politics, Fox Business Network’s Stuart Varney illustrated another reason that Fox would pay so much attention to Ocasio-Cortez.
“We have an AOC segment every day, almost every single hour,” he said. “She’s good for our ratings.”

Read More…

Brexit: Boris Johnson ‘wrong on no-deal polling claim’ – BBC News

Image copyright Reuters Boris Johnson was wrong to claim there was polling evidence that a no-deal Brexit was the public’s preferred option, the press regulator has ruled.
Ipso ordered the Daily Telegraph to print a correction after finding the MP’s column was inaccurate.
The claim was made in a piece headlined “The British people won’t be scared into backing a woeful Brexit deal nobody voted for” in January.
The Telegraph had argued it was “clearly comically polemical”.
The column appeared a week before MPs rejected Theresa May’s Brexit deal for the first time , by a historic margin. The Commons went on to reject the withdrawal agreement in a further two votes.
Brexit: What happens now? Brexit jargon explained In his piece, prominent Brexiteer Mr Johnson, who quit as foreign secretary over Mrs May’s Brexit strategy last July, wrote: “Of all the options suggested by pollsters – staying in the EU, coming out on Theresa May’s terms, or coming out on World Trade terms – it is the last, the so-called no-deal option, that is gaining in popularity.
“In spite of – or perhaps because of – everything they have been told, it is this future that is by some margin preferred by the British public.”
According to Ipso, the newspaper argued that it was clearly an opinion piece and readers would understand that it was not invoking specific polling – and that the Conservative MP’s column was “clearly comically polemical” and would not be read as a “serious, empirical, in-depth analysis of hard factual matters”.
‘Hyperbole and melodrama’ And it argued that various combinations of results in four polls reflected support for a no-deal scenario over Theresa May’s deal or remaining in the EU.
But following a complaint that it was inaccurate, Ipso said the article, published on 7 January, failed to provide accurate information with “a basis in fact” and ordered a correction to be printed.
In its ruling, Ipso said that while columnists were free to use “hyperbole, melodrama and humour”, they must take care “over the accuracy of any claims of fact”.
It said the Telegraph had not provided data to back up the claims and had “construed the polls as signalling support for a no deal, when in fact, this was the result of the publication either amalgamating several findings together or interpreting an option beyond what was set out by the poll, as being a finding in support of a no-deal Brexit”.
It found it was a “significant inaccuracy, because it misrepresented polling information” and upheld a complaint that it had breached clause 1 of the Editors’ Code of Practice.

Read More…

Doug Ford government scrapping law that compensates crime victims | CBC News

The Doug Ford government is scrapping an Ontario law that provides financial help to the victims of violent crime.
Legislation to repeal the Compensation for Victims of Crime Act is contained in the 194-page bill tabled as part of Finance Minister Vic Fedeli’s budget on Thursday.
Ontario budget features child-care credit, dental care for seniors, drinking in parks Booze at 9 a.m., online gambling and more combat sports feature heavily in PC budget Ontario budget: College and university funding to be tied to ‘performance outcomes’ The existing act allows for lump-sum payments of up to $25,000 or monthly payments of up to $1,000 to the families of those killed during a crime and to people who are injured in a criminal act, including sexual or domestic assault.
The Ford government’s budget bill would also dissolve Ontario’s Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, the tribunal that has awarded financial assistance to crime victims since 1971. The money is given to cover such items as funeral costs, physical therapy and loss of income.
A spokesperson for Attorney General Caroline Mulroney said the move is being made because crime victims are waiting too long for compensation from the board.
“Instead of having to appear before an adjudicator to decide how much compensation should be paid, a claimant would submit his or her paperwork and receipts to the Ministry or another administrative body who would issue its payment quicker,” said Mulroney’s press secretary Jesse Robichaud in a statement emailed to CBC News on Friday.
A spokesperson for Ontario Attorney General Caroline Mulroney said the legislation would update outdated procedures and codify common law. (CBC) The government has plans “that will reduce administrative costs to provide financial assistance to victims,” according to a passage in Fedeli’s budget.
The budget says “an enhanced victims’ financial assistance program would be offered by the Ministry of the Attorney General” after the current act is repealed and the board dissolved.
52 lose jobs as child advocate and French-language watchdog offices close Ford government promises auto insurance reforms to reduce premiums The budget says the government is “reforming victim compensation services by replacing the adjudicative model with an administrative model to ensure that victims receive financial assistance faster and more efficiently with less administrative burden.”
This would save up to $23 million annually starting in 2021–22, says the budget, and the government would “reinvest” $6 million annually in “victim services.”
The date when the board would be dissolved is not in the budget bill. Until that happens, compensation paid to victims for “pain and suffering” would be capped at $5,000. The maximum lump-sum total payment would rise to $30,000 from the current limit of $25,000.
Former Ontario ombudsman André Marin revealed in 2007 that it took an average of three years for people to receive compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board. He blamed the Ministry of the Attorney General for ‘starving the board of resources.’ The board came under sharp criticism in a 2007 report by then-ombudsman André Marin for delays that meant it took the average victim three years to receive compensation .
But Marin pinned much of the blame on the Ministry of the Attorney General for “starving the board of resources” to carry out its duties and for at times ordering the board to delay compensation to victims to stay within its budget.
PCs threaten gas stations with $10,000/day fines if they don’t display carbon-tax stickers During the 2011 election campaign, then-leader of the PCs Tim Hudak slammed the board as a “horror show,” and promised to cut red tape around victim compensation, but not to dissolve the board.
“Our goal is to provide support to victims in a timely and compassionate manner,” says the Attorney General’s current webpage for the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board,
“Compensation can play a vital role in a victim’s financial, physical and emotional recovery,” says a brochure on the board’s website .

Read More…

Fox mentions Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for 42 days running – 3,181 times | US news

Democrat receives 3,181 mentions on Fox News and Fox Business suggesting rightwing media obsession with congresswoman

Read More…

‘Holy Stairs’ climbed by Jesus before crucifixion opens for first time in 300 years News

The 28 steps of Rome's Scala Santa, or “Holy Stairs,” are believed to be part of Pontius Pilate's Jerusalem palace where Jesus was tried before being sentenced to crucifixion. EGGS SHOW KIDS THE 'TRUE MEANING' OF THE HOLIDAY “I already did it when it was wooden steps but it's much more moving now,” one pilgrim told AFP News. “If you think about the fact that Jesus was here, and where he was held and where he suffered, it's very emotional.”
Faithful kneel on the newly restored Holy Stairs (Scala Sancta), which according to Catholic Church is the stair on which Jesus Christ stepped leading on his way to the crucifixion, during a special opening, in Rome, Thursday, April 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
According to tradition, the marble stairs were brought to Rome by St. Helena, Emporer Constantine's mother, around 300 years after Christ's death and when Christianity was the religion of the Roman Empire.
The stairs were opened to pilgrims Thursday until Pentecost, a total of 60 days. The stairs have been encased in wood since 1723 to protect them from being worn down further when Pope Innocent XIII decided it could no longer stand the wear and tear of millions of pilgrims.
“If you close your eyes for a moment, you can imagine yourself back in the medieval era, the last time that people scaled these steps on their knees,” said Guido Cornini, a curator from the Vatican Museums.
A view of the newly restored Holy Stairs (Scala Sancta), which according to Catholic Church is the stair on which Jesus Christ stepped leading on his way to the crucifixion, during a special opening, in Rome, Thursday, April 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Cardinal Angelo De Donatis, Vicar General of the diocese of Rome, blessed the staircase before crowds of Catholic congregants got down on their hands and knees to ascend the deeply worn marble stairway, as is the tradition.
There are three crosses along the stairs, believed to be the locations where Jesus fell and there are drops of his blood. Pilgrims kissed the crosses as they made their way up, with protective covers over their shoes to maintain the marble.
The steps lead to the Sancta Sanctorum, or Holy of Holies, which was once the private chapel for popes and where several Roman Catholic sacred relics are stored.
The restoration of the steps was funded by Patrons of the Arts in the Vatican Museums and will be open until June 9, after which they will be covered once again.
Caleb Parke is an associate editor for FoxNews.com. You can follow him on Twitter @calebparke ADVERTISEMENT U.S.

Read More…