Why Ecuador ended asylum for 'spoiled brat' Julian Assange – NBC News

Why Ecuador ended asylum for ‘spoiled brat’ Julian Assange – NBC News

Tech & Media Why Ecuador ended asylum for ‘spoiled brat’ Julian Assange Ecudaor, which prides itself on its hospitality and spent almost $1 million a year protecting the WikiLeaks founder, saw his behavior as a national insult. April 12, 2019 01:56 Breaking News Emails Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings. SUBSCRIBE April 12, 2019, 8:54 AM GMT / Updated April 12, 2019, 11:17 AM GMT By Associated Press QUITO, Ecuador — The dramatic end to Julian Assange’s asylum has sparked curiosity about his seven-year stay inside Ecuador’s Embassy in London that was marked by his late-night skateboarding, the physical harassment of his caretakers and even the smearing of his own fecal matter on the walls of the diplomatic mission. It would’ve tested the patience of any host. But for tiny Ecuador, which prides itself on its hospitality and spent almost $1 million a year protecting Assange, it was also seen as a national insult. “We’ve ended the asylum of this spoiled brat,” a visibly flustered President Lenin Moreno said Thursday in a fiery speech explaining his decision to withdraw protection of Assange and hand him over to British police. “From now on we’ll be more careful in giving asylum to people who are really worth it, and not miserable hackers whose only goal is to destabilize governments.” Others, including former Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa, who granted Assange asylum in 2012, said that while Assange violated the terms of his asylum and was a burden on Ecuador “that’s no excuse for throwing him to the lions.” Related A timeline of Assange’s nearly 7 years in the Ecuadorian Embassy Ecuador emerged as a haven for the WikiLeaks founder in 2012 as his legal options to evade extradition to Sweden over sex crime accusations dried up in the United Kingdom. On a June day, he moved into the country’s embassy near the upscale Harrods department store for what most thought would be a short stay. Instead, the cramped quarters, where a small office was converted into a bedroom, became a permanent address that some likened to a de facto jail. As the asylum dragged on, his relations with his hosts soured and his behavior became more erratic. Embassy staff complained of him skateboarding at night, playing loud music and walking around in his underwear with no apparent concern for others in the tiny embassy. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks from a balcony at Ecuador’s Embassy in London in May 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas / AFP – Getty Images file One senior Ecuadorian official described his room as a “sovereign territory within a sovereign territory” that none of the staff at No. 3 Hans Crescent could enter. But the stench from going weeks without a shower, and dental problem born of poor hygiene, was a constant nuisance, according to the official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he isn’t authorized to discuss details of Assange’s behavior. Download the NBC News app for breaking news and politics Then there was the issue of Assange’s poop, which authorities said he spread across embassy walls on at least one occasion in an act of open defiance showing how little he thought of his hosts. “When you’re given shelter, cared for and provided food, you don’t denounce the owner of the house,” Moreno said Thursday to applause. Within months of taking office in 2017, Moreno’s government scolded Assange again for meddling in international affairs by voicing his support for Catalan secessionists from the Ecuadorian Embassy. Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno. AFP – Getty Images Relations grew so prickly that last year Ecuador increased its restrictions on his Internet access and required him to clean up after his cat James . The rules said that if the feline wasn’t properly fed and cleaned up after, it would be sent to the pound. Assange tried challenging the restrictions in Ecuadorian court, to no avail. More recently, as the feuding became more public, he started physically and verbally harassing his caretakers, accusing them of being U.S. spies looking to exchange information on WikiLeaks in exchange for debt relief for Ecuador. Foreign Minister Jose Valencia said in an audio recording a few months ago captured a moment when Assange threatened Ambassador Jaime Merchan with pressing something of a panic button that he said would bring devastating consequences for the Embassy in the event of his arrest. Although it wasn’t clear what he meant by the threat, authorities shared their concerns with British authorities and in carrying out the raid Thursday were careful to prevent Assange from returning to his room to execute any possible emergency plans. The final straw for Moreno was WikiLeaks’ decision to spread information about a purported offshore account controlled by the president’s brother. Personal photographs of Moreno lying in bed, as well as images of close family members dancing, were also leaked, further incensing him. Associated Press

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Bounty pregnancy club fined £400,000 over data handling – BBC News

Pregnancy club Bounty UK has been given a £400,000 fine for illegally sharing the personal information of more than 14 million people.
The fine was issued by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in what it said was an “unprecedented” case.
Bounty compiled personal data but did not tell people that it was shared with 39 other organisations, said the ICO.
Bounty said it “acknowledged” the ICO’s findings and had now made changes to how it handled member data.
‘Careless’ data-sharing The Bounty pregnancy and parenting club offers free samples, vouchers and guides to prospective and new parents via packs given out in hospitals or sent to people who use its apps.
Bounty gathered information from apps, its website, cards in merchandise packs and from new mothers in hospital.
The ICO said that while many knew Bounty as a pregnancy club, few knew that it was also a data broker supplying information to third parties that would use it to fine-tune direct marketing.
Bounty breached the 1998 Data Protection Act by not being “open and transparent” with people about what would be done with their personal data.
Image caption Bounty took data in hospitals and from apps and merchandise packs It shared 34.3 million records from June 2017 to April 2018 with 39 organisations including marketing agencies Acxiom, Equifax and Indicia.
The data shared was of “potentially vulnerable” people including new mothers and very young children, said the ICO.
“The number of personal records and people affected in this case is unprecedented in the history of the ICO’s investigations into the data broking industry and organisations linked to this,” said Steve Eckersley, the watchdog’s director of investigations.
Mr Eckersley said the “careless” data-sharing was likely to have caused distress to many people because they did not know it was being shared so widely.
Jim Kelleher, Bounty’s managing director, said: “In the past, we did not take a broad enough view of our responsibilities and as a result our data-sharing processes, specifically with regards to transparency, were not robust enough.”
He added that the ICO had recognised that Bounty had changed its data-handling policies and that it now kept fewer records for less time. It had also ended relationships with all data brokers. Staff had also been trained to handle data to comply with the latest legislation.
In addition, said Mr Kelleher, Bounty planned to appoint an independent data expert to carry out an annual survey to ensure it did not breach data protection laws.

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DILG exec files complaints vs 52 barangay officials engaged in partisan politics | Inquirer News

BREAK: Ex-military comptroller convicted of perjury
“Fifty-two lang ito (There were only 52) from all over the Philippines. May Misamis Oriental, may Cavite, may Taguig, Cavite, Bulacan, Quezon City [and] Caloocan,” Densing added.
Densing said only the President, Vice President, and other elected officials are allowed to engage in partisan politics (except barangay officials) as per the joint memorandum from Comelec and Civil Service Commission.
“May joint memorandum ang Comelec, Civil Service Commission na 001-2016 na dine-define na tinatawag na political offices at pino-prohibit ang mga civil servants na magkampanya during elections,” Densing said.
(There is a joint memorandum from the Comelec and the Civil Service Commission that defines political offices and prohibits civil servants to campaign during elections.)
“Ang nakalagay dun, ang allowed lang na magkampanya presidente, bise presidente ng pilipinas at (It was stated there that those who are allowed to campaign are the president, the vice president and) other elected officials except barangay officials and of course the confidential staff of these officials,” he added.
The DILG official said they received 700 reports of barangay officials allegedly engaged in partisan politics but will file only 52 initial complaints for now.
Densing noted that they are validating the reports with the help of lawyers from DILG’s Bantay Korapsyon. ADVERTISEMENT
“Hindi ko alam kung aabutin ang (I am not sure if we can come up with) 700 but we will file cases as many as we can,” he said.
Densing, however, did not identify the officials facing the complaints. /ee Read Next

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‘Immunity can wear off over time’: doctors highlight undervaccination in adults | CBC News

‘Immunity can wear off over time’: Doctors highlight undervaccination in adults Social Sharing Health ‘Immunity can wear off over time’: Doctors highlight undervaccination in adults Vaccinations are commonly considered a childhood health issue, but if adults think they’re protected, doctors say that’s not always the case. Some adults may need a vaccination booster for highly contagious infectious diseases like measles. Social Sharing Some adults may need a vaccination booster for highly contagious infectious diseases Amina Zafar · CBC News · Posted: Apr 12, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: April 12 Aysha, 4, suffered from measles, in Lahore, Pakistan, in 2013. Since the highly contagious viral disease is common outside of North America, adults who plan to travel may need a measles booster before flying.(Mohsin Raza/Reuters)
Vaccinations are commonly considered a childhood health issue, but if adults think they’re protected, doctors say that’s not always the case. Some adults may need a vaccination booster for highly contagious infectious diseases like measles.
Amid travel-related measles cases in British Columbia’s Lower Mainland, New York City, New Jersey, California, Michigan, Washington state, as well as outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America, some doctors are raising awareness about adults who may be inadvertently undervaccinated.
Many people are unaware that their immunity can wear off over time. People born in Canada between 1970 and 1996 may need an extra dose of the vaccine to protect themselves — particularly if they are planning to travel abroad.
This week’s news of an Ottawa cancer patient who contracted measles despite being vaccinated drew attention to the issue. In Jayda Kelsall’s case, she’d been vaccinated against measles, but local public health officials told her some people with weakened immune systems can still be vulnerable to the virus.
Most other pathogens spread by droplets, meaning for instance you have to touch a contaminated surface and then your face. But measles is highly contagious: it can be spread to an unprotected person just by breathing in the same air as someone with the illness, said Dr. Jeff Kwong, a family physician at Toronto Western’s family health team and a scientist at ICES, formerly the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Measles is making a comeback. So how did we get here?
Measles most commonly causes fever, rash or a runny nose. Symptoms can also include tiny white spots in the mouth, followed by a characteristic blotchy rash three to seven days after the first symptoms appear.
“It can cause complications like pneumonia, infections in the brain and even death, and so that’s why we want to prevent these infections as much as possible so that we can prevent these serious outcomes,” Kwong said.
People born before 1970 are generally considered immune since measles infections were so common then. But those born in Canada after 1970 and before 1996 likely received only one dose of the vaccine that protects against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) and may not be fully protected.
“What we know is that the immunity can wear off over time, so those people should really have a second dose,” said Dr. Kimberly Wintemute, a family physician with the North York Family Health Team in Toronto. Measles ‘undoubtedly spreading’
In the mid-1990s, medical researchers realized the MMR immunity from a single dose wears off in about 15 per cent of people, Wintemute said. Now, such people are typically offered a blood test to check their immunity. A second shot of the vaccine was introduced for children in Canada in 1996-97.
Staff members in her office searched their electronic medical records for potentially vulnerable adults born between 1970 and the mid- 1990s who might need a measles shot. The data manager discovered about a quarter of patients in the practice may be undervaccinated . People born in Canada after 1970 and before 1996 likely received only one dose of the vaccine that protects against measles, mumps and rubella and may not be fully protected. (Eric Risberg/Associated Press)
Some of those patients could be contacted to notify them and to be asked if they’ve received a second dose, perhaps at a travel clinic or after giving birth in hospital, which wouldn’t be recorded at Wintemute’s office.
International destinations such as the Philippines and Israel have been hard hit with measles, she said.
“It’s undoubtedly spreading because people are moving around the globe on airplanes and whatnot,” Wintemute said. “I can think of a patient last week who said you know they were going away in two days’ time and we wouldn’t have been able to get the blood test back in two days. We just gave that person a booster.”
In Canada, anyone born before 1970 who doesn’t remember having measles in childhood should probably have their immunity checked with a blood test, she said. That’s particularly the case for adults planning to travel outside of North America or where measles is known to be circulating. About a quarter of the adult patients at Dr. Kimberly Wintemute’s family medicine practice may be undervaccinated, a search of electronic medical records suggested.(CBC)
The advice is similar for people born outside of Canada.
“If that individual has immunization records for themselves, they should show those to their health care provider and have a conversation about whether their vaccines are up to date — frankly, not just for measles, but for all sorts of vaccine preventable diseases,” said Dr. Sarah Wilson, a public health physician at Public Health Ontario.

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“fbi criticism” – Google News: Trump bulldozes across the presidency’s red lines – Politico

President Donald Trump has broken precedent by trying to bulldoze through institutions he feels get in his way. | Alex Wong/Getty Images Analysis
Trump bulldozes across the presidency’s red lines In recent weeks, the president has labored to reshape a federal government he feels is frustrating his agenda.
By NANCY COOK
04/12/2019 05:05 AM EDT

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