Nancy Pelosi shows no restraint on disparaging young progressive women | Arwa Mahdawi | World news

Nancy Pelosi shows no restraint on disparaging young progressive women | Arwa Mahdawi | World news

The House speaker refused to comment on Trump while traveling, but has been openly critical of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar. Sign up for the Week in Patriarchy, a newsletter​ on feminism and sexism sent every Saturday.
Nancy Pelosi’s sisterly civility problem Have you heard of the “inappropriate in Ireland” rule? No, I haven’t either. But according to Nancy Pelosi it’s a thing. On Friday, the House speaker was asked whether Congress was planning to impeach Donald Trump, a question that’s kinda top of mind at the moment. Pelosi, who was in Belfast, refused to comment , telling journalists it wouldn’t be appropriate to criticize the president while she’s abroad.
It’s strange that Pelosi should care about the etiquette of when and where it is appropriate to criticize a morally bankrupt demagogue who is clearly unfit for office. Particularly as she doesn’t seem bound by any geographical restrictions when it comes to disparaging the progressive young women in her own party.
Fox mentions Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for 42 days running – 3,181 times Read more
There seems to be no rule about not insulting Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez from abroad, for example. On Monday, Pelosi told an audience at the London School of Economics that a “glass of water” could have won a seat in Ocasio-Cortez’s “solidly Democratic” district. Which rather glosses over the fact that 28-year-old Ocasio-Cortez defeated Joe Crowley, a 10-term incumbent, in the primaries. And completely misses the point that Ocasio-Cortez was elected because people are desperate for real change, not more establishment centrists like Crowley. (Who, by the way, then went off to join a corporate lobbying firm that reps clients from the fossil fuel industry.)
Pelosi also doesn’t seem to find it necessary to treat Minnesota congresswoman Ilhan Omar with much respect. She has made it abundantly clear that she sees Omar as a nuisance to be dealt with, rather than a colleague to be defended. When Trump recently tweeted a racist video dishonestly accusing Omar of minimizing 9/11, the likes of Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders jumped to Omar’s defence. Pelosi’s reaction , meanwhile, was to not mention Omar’s name and tweet a thinly veiled jab about the memory of 9/11 being sacred ground.
Pelosi has been very vocal about the fact that she thinks the way Democrats will beat Trump is by staying firmly in the centre, and has repeatedly downplayed the influence of Ocasio-Cortez and other progressives. Just a day before her “glass of water” insult, Pelosi dismissed the more left-leaning faction of the Democratic party as “like, five people” during an interview on 60 Minutes . She’s also sneered at initiatives like the Green New Deal, which she has described as “ the green dream, or whatever they call it ” . The House speaker has been happy to wax lyrical about how young and diverse her party is, but clearly isn’t so happy to actually listen to those new voices.
Which is a shame because those new voices are doing what Pelosi should be doing: calling for a more equitable America, and unambiguously calling for Trump to be impeached. In the wake of Robert Mueller’s report, Ocasio-Cortez and Omar have both said they will sign Rashida Tlaib’s impeachment resolution. Pelosi should be doing the same, rather than comparing women in her party to glasses of water.
Bring on American ‘homocracy’ A Virginia pastor has warned that if Pete Buttigieg was elected president, the openly gay politician and his LGBTQ supporters would turn America into a “homocracy ” . He wasn’t entirely clear about what this homocracy would look like, but one imagines it would be fabulous.
Bangladeshi teenager murdered after reporting sexual harassment Nineteen-year-old Nusrat Jahan Rafi has died after being set on fire at her school . The attack seems to have been retaliation for Nusrat accusing her headteacher of sexual harassment. “The teacher touched me. I will fight this crime till my last breath,” Nusrat says in a video recorded in the ambulance before she died. What an incredibly brave woman.
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Nusrat Jahan Rafi. Photograph: Handout Malaysian women investigated for ‘dehijabbing’
Islamic officials in Malaysia are investigating three women who held a panel discussion about not wearing the hijab . In a joint statement the women said they “condemn this unnecessary investigation as abuse of power to harass and intimidate women activists who are speaking up on issues affecting women”. Over the last few years there has been a worrying rise in hardline Islam in Malaysia, and women’s rights seem increasingly in jeopardy.
Gender-based TV channels Italy’s state broadcaster is thinking about having separate TV channels for men and women . Someone apparently forgot to tell them that it is 2019.
Eagle parenting duties Two male bald eagles, and one female, have formed a very modern family in north-west Illinois. The trio have hatched three eggs and are taking turns feeding the babies and tending the nest. Meanwhile, in the human world, women still spend a lot more time on housework and childcare than men.
The first female leprechaun For the first time in history , the University of Notre Dame has chosen a woman to serve as a leprechaun, the school’s official mascot. A big moment for little girls everywhere who thought they could never grow up to be green, gold-hoarding fairies.
Topics US politics The week in patriarchy Nancy Pelosi House of Representatives Feminism Women comment

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Bees living on Notre-Dame cathedral roof survive blaze – BBC News

Cathedral beekeeper Nicolas Geant says the bees would have got “drunk” on smoke from the fire Notre-Dame’s smallest residents have survived the devastating fire which destroyed most of the cathedral’s roof and toppled its famous spire.
Some 200,000 bees living in hives on the roof were initially thought to have perished in the blaze.
However Nicolas Géant, the cathedral’s beekeeper, has confirmed that the bees are alive and buzzing.
Mr Géant has looked after the cathedral’s three beehives since 2013, when they were installed.
That was part of an initiative to boost bee numbers across Paris.
The hives sit on top of the sacristy by Notre-Dame’s south side, around 30m (98 ft) below the main roof. As a result, Mr Géant says they remained untouched by the flames.
The story of Notre-Dame How new tech might help Notre-Dame rebuild Notre-Dame inspires US black churches help European bees – unlike other species – stay by their hive after sensing danger, gorging on honey and working to protect their queen.
High temperatures would have posed the biggest risk, but Mr Géant explained that any smoke would have simply intoxicated them.
“Instead of killing them, the carbon dioxide makes them drunk, puts them to sleep,” he told AP.
Beekeepers commonly use smoke to sedate the insects and gain access to their hive.
Why Notre-Dame’s beauty wins hearts around the world Notre-Dame before the fire in 360° video In pictures- Notre-Dame interior damage “I was incredibly sad about Notre-Dame because it’s such a beautiful building ,” Mr Géant said in an interview with CNN.
“But to hear there is life when it comes to the bees, that’s just wonderful.”
“Thank goodness the flames didn’t touch them,” he added. “It’s a miracle!”

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‘Church’ to offer ‘miracle cure’ despite FDA warnings against drinking bleach | US news | The Guardian

Group to hold ‘effective alternative healing’ event in Washington state in which they peddle a ‘sacrament’ known to be industrial cleaner

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The ‘debate of the century’: what happened when Jordan Peterson debated Slavoj Žižek | World news

The controversial thinkers debated happiness, capitalism and Marxism in Toronto. It was billed as a meeting of titans – and that it was not. But it did reveal one telling commonality. T he event was billed as “the debate of the century”, “The Rumble in the Realm of the Mind”, and it did have the feel of a heavyweight boxing match: Jordan Peterson, local boy, against the slapdash Slovenian Slavoj Žižek , considering “Happiness: Capitalism vs Marxism” in Toronto.
Peterson, in his opening remarks, noted that scalped tickets were selling at higher prices than the Maple Leafs playoff game happening on the other side of town. He couldn’t believe it. Who could?
Peterson and Žižek represent a basic fact of intellectual life in the twenty-first century: we are defined by our enemies.
Peterson has risen to fame on the basis of his refusal to pay the usual fealties to political correctness. The size and scope of his fame registers more or less exactly the loathing for identity politics in the general populace, because it certainly isn’t on the quality of his books that his reputation resides. Žižek is also defined, and has been for years, by his contempt for postmodern theory and, by extension, the more academic dimensions of political correctness.
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Jordan Peterson, Canadian psychology professor and author Photograph: Mikko Stig/REX/Shutterstock
Peterson’s opening remarks were disappointing even for his fans in the audience. They were a vague and not particularly informed (by his own admission) reading of The Communist Manifesto. His comments on one of the greatest feats of human rhetoric were full of expressions like “You have to give the devil his due” and “This is a weird one” and “Almost all ideas are wrong”.
I’ve been a professor, so I know what it’s like to wake up with a class scheduled and no lecture prepared. It felt like that. He wandered between the Paleolithic period and small business management, appearing to know as little about the former as the latter. Watching him, I was amazed that anyone had ever taken him seriously enough to hate him.
He said things like “Marx thought the proletariat was good and the bourgeoisie was evil”. At one point, he made a claim that human hierarchies are not determined by power because that would be too unstable a system, and a few in the crowd tittered. That snapped him back into his skill set: self-defense. “The people who laugh might do it that way,” he replied. By the end of his half-hour he had not mentioned the word happiness once.
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Slavoj Žižek, psychoanalytic philosopher, cultural critic, and Hegelian Marxist. Photograph: Antonio Olmos/The Observer
Žižek didn’t really address the matter at hand, either, preferring to relish his enmities. “Most of the attacks on me are from left-liberals,” he began, hoping that “they would be turning in their graves even if they were still alive”. His remarks were just as rambling as Peterson’s, veering from Trump and Sanders to Dostoevsky to the refugee crisis to the aesthetics of Nazism. If Peterson was an ill-prepared prof, Žižek was a columnist stitching together a bunch of 1,000-worders. He too finished his remarks with a critique of political correctness, which he described as the world of impotence that masks pure defeat.
The great surprise of this debate turned out to be how much in common the old-school Marxist and the Canadian identity politics refusenik had.
One hated communism. The other hated communism but thought that capitalism possessed inherent contradictions. The first one agreed that capitalism possessed inherent contradictions. And that was basically it. They both wanted the same thing: capitalism with regulation, which is what every sane person wants. The Peterson-Žižek encounter was the ultra-rare case of a debate in 2019 that was perhaps too civil.
They needed enemies, needed combat, because in their solitudes, they had so little to offer. Peterson is neither a racist nor a misogynist. He is a conservative. He seemed, in person, quite gentle. But when you’ve said that, you’ve said everything. Somehow hectoring mobs have managed to turn him into an icon of all they are not. Remove him from his enemies and he is a very poor example of a very old thing – the type of writer whom, from Samuel Smiles’ Self-Help to Eckhart Tolle’s The Power of Now, have promised simple answers to complex problems. Rules for Life, as if there were such things.
The mere dumb presence of the celebrities on the stage mattered vastly more than anything they said, naturally. But there was one truly fascinating moment in the evening. It came right at the end of Žižek’s opening 30-minute remarks.
Pity Jordan Peterson. Can a giant lobster analogy ever replace a sense of humour? Read more
“We will probably slide towards apocalypse,” he said. And Peterson agreed with him: “It is not obvious to me that we can solve the problems that confront us.” They are both self-described “radical pessimists”, about people and the world. It made me wonder about the rage consuming all public discussion at the moment: are we screaming at each other because we disagree or because we do agree and we can’t imagine a solution?
Both of these men know that they are explicitly throwbacks. They do not have an answer to the real problems that face us: the environment and the rise of China as a successful capitalist state without democracy. (China’s success makes a joke out of the whole premise of the debate: the old-fashioned distinction between communism and capitalism.) Neither can face the reality or the future. Therefore they retreat.
Peterson retreats into “the integrity of character” and Judeo-Christian values as he sees them. Žižek is more or less a Gen X nostalgia act at this point, a living memento from a time when you would sit around the college bar and regale your fellow students about the time you saw that eastern European prof eating a couple of hot dogs in the street.
Unfortunately, this brief moment of confrontation of their shared failure couldn’t last. They returned to their natural subject: who is the enemy? Žižek asked what Peterson meant by cultural Marxists when postmodern thinkers, like Foucault, weren’t Marxist at all. Peterson was an expert on this subject, at least. He gave a minor history of the French critical theorists who transposed categories of class oppression for group oppression in the 1960s.
And they both agreed, could not have agreed more, that it was all the fault of the “academic left”. They seemed to believe that the “academic left”, whoever that might be, was some all-powerful cultural force rather than the impotent shrinking collection of irrelevances it is. If the academic left is all-powerful, they get to indulge in their victimization.
And that was the great irony of the debate: what it comes down to is that they believe they are the victims of a culture of victimization. They play the victim as much as their enemies. It’s all anyone can do at this point.
In the end Peterson-Žižek was less of a heavyweight boxing match than a WWE Grand Slam. Not that I was disappointed. I did see “the debate of the century”, the debate of our century. It was full of the stench of burning strawmen. A big deal, with huge numbers, and really very little underneath.
Topics Philosophy Slavoj Žižek Communism comment

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P.E.I. Green Party candidate dies days before provincial election | CBC News

P.E.I. Green Party candidate Josh Underhay and his young son died in a canoeing accident in the Hillsborough River on Friday.
Underhay was the party’s candidate in District 9, Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park.
Elections P.E.I. said, in accordance with the Election Act, a byelection will be held in his riding in the coming weeks. The election is set for Tuesday.
Queens District RCMP received a call Friday at about 4:20 p.m. reporting two people missing on the Hillsborough River, said Sgt. Leanne Butler. She said the pair had gone canoeing in the afternoon, but had not returned to the agreed pickup spot at the appointed time.
Rescue crews found the man and boy at about 7 p.m. in the water near Heartz Road in East Royalty, Butler said. They both had been wearing flotation devices, and their capsized canoe was nearby.
Green Party Leader Peter Bevan-Baker called Underhay a “dear friend and colleague” for many years. (Elisa Serret/Radio-Canada) They were taken to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Charlottetown, where they were declared deceased. The P.E.I. coroner’s office will determine the cause of death, Butler said.
Underhay is survived by his wife and another child.
Underhay was also a teacher at Birchwood Intermediate School in Charlottetown, a community volunteer and an avid trumpet player.
Josh Underhay and his young son were found in the Hillsborough River near their capsized canoe on Friday. Police say they were both wearing flotation devices. (Brittany Spencer/CBC) “Josh has been a dear friend and colleague of mine for many years, as a volunteer, musician, passionate cycling advocate and Green Party supporter,” said P.E.I. Green Party Leader Bevan-Baker in a written statement.
“He has touched the lives of everyone who knew him, including the students he taught, fellow musicians and members of the party.”
Counselling support at Birchwood In a statement, P.E.I.’s Public Schools Branch expressed condolences and said counselling support would be available at Birchwood when classes resume on Tuesday.
“Our entire education community is deeply saddened by the tragic death of Josh Underhay and his young son. A Birchwood Intermediate teacher, Josh was a passionate educator who was loved and respected by his students and colleagues,” the statement said.
Bevan-Baker said all party activities will be suspended for the remainder of the election campaign, which is set to wrap up when Islanders go to the polls on Tuesday.
Josh Underhay was the Green Party candidate for District 9: Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park. Some of the other candidates in the district took their signs down on Saturday. (Brittany Spencer/CBC) The three other political parties on the Island expressed condolences and have suspended campaign activities. Some candidates in District 9 took their signs down on Saturday.
Voters in his riding will not be casting ballots for a candidate on Tuesday, but have the option of voting in the poll on electoral reform.
Information sessions on electoral reform were cancelled on Saturday.
“Josh brought humour, enthusiasm and boundless energy to every situation,” said Bevan-Baker. “I simply cannot imagine how much he will be missed.”
Many people wrote messages in honour of Underhay at the Haviland Club in Charlottetown on Saturday. (Brittany Spencer/CBC) Along with police, fire departments from Charlottetown, Stratford and North River were called in for the search, as well as the Department of Fisheries and P.E.I. Ground Search and Rescue.
A GoFundMe campaign set up Saturday for Underhay’s family has raised tens of thousands of dollars.
On Saturday afternoon, a large crowd gathered at the Haviland Club to honour Underhay.
So many of us are in pain tonight. Press release from @peigreens on the loss of a friend #peipoli https://t.co/UJ3Q3cgeqg
— @peterbevanbaker

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