TV news war: Newshub journos brace for cost-cutting

TV news war: Newshub journos brace for cost-cutting

Share on Reddit reddit MediaWorks journalists are bracing for a restructure announcement today designed to save money and improve the company’s flagship Newshub Live at 6. An email sent to Newshub staff this morning – and promptly leaked to the Herald – reveals a shakeup of the newsroom that will involve cost-cutting measures. The email was sent by Newshub chief news officer Hal Crawford and explains that a series of changes in “newsroom roles and structures” would be proposed today. “I will be meeting with affected individuals through day,” Crawford says in the email. Advertisement Advertise with NZME. “The key focus will be on the Newshub@6pm bulletin, with proposals that bolster the show’s promotional power. The bulletin’s performance has very good this year and I think it can be even better.” Crawford said the proposed changes would aim to improve editorial quality and ratings for Newshub Live at 6, fronted by Mike McRoberts and Samantha Hayes, who recently announced she is pregnant with her first child . Newshub’s respected head of broadcast news Richard Sutherland recently defected to RNZ. Reducing costs was also a focus, as was improving “cross platform output”, the email said. An email sent out by Newshub boss Hal Crawford reveals changes are on the cards. Photo/ File The email also hints at changes across other parts of the business. “In the current media environment, we can’t stand still,” Crawford says. Related articles:

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Alabama to vote on bill banning abortion – BBC News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The heated debate over Alabama’s abortion bill Alabama has become the latest US state to move to restrict abortions by passing a bill to outlaw the procedure in almost all cases.
The law includes a ban on abortion in cases of rape or incest.
Supporters say they expect the law to be blocked in court but hope that the appeals process will bring it before the Supreme Court.
They want the court, which now has a conservative majority, to overturn the 1973 ruling legalising abortion.
Alabama’s 35-seat Senate is dominated by men, and none of its four female senators backed the ban which will now go to Governor Kay Ivey.
She has said she will only sign it into law once she has considered it.
How US abortion debate got to this point What’s behind Georgia’s anti-abortion ‘heartbeat bill’? ‘Sex strike’ urged in abortion law protest Sixteen other states are seeking to impose new restrictions on abortion.
Earlier this year the Supreme Court blocked implementation of new abortion restrictions in Louisiana. However the ruling was made by a narrow margin and the case is due to be reviewed later this year.
Why is this happening now? The bill’s architects expect that it will be defeated in the lower courts, but hope that it will therefore eventually come before the Supreme Court.
They have been emboldened by the addition of two conservative justices nominated by President Donald Trump, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, who give the nine-member court a conservative majority.
Their aim, they say, is for the landmark 1973 Roe v Wade ruling to be undermined or overturned completely.
Alabama’s Lieutenant Governor Will Ainsworth said: “Roe must be challenged, and I am proud that Alabama is leading the way.”
Eric Johnston, who founded the Alabama Pro-Life Coalition that helped draft the bill, told NPR: “The dynamic has changed.
“The judges have changed, a lot of changes over that time, and so I think we’re at the point where we need to take a bigger and a bolder step.”
What is in the Alabama bill? Under the bill, doctors face 10 years in prison for attempting to terminate a pregnancy and 99 years for carrying out the procedure.
A woman who has an abortion would not be held criminally liable, and abortion in cases where the mother’s life is at serious risk are allowed.
The state Senate approved the law by 25 votes to six, rejecting exemptions for cases of rape or incest, with some noting all those voting for the bill were men.
Skip Twitter post by @SikhProf 22 Senators voted against including an exception for rape or incest in Alabama’s new draconian abortion law.
Notice any similarities? pic.twitter.com/QNxFC1JU2u
— Simran Jeet Singh (@SikhProf) May 15, 2019 Report End of Twitter post by @SikhProf
‘Why are we here again?” by Ritu Prasad, BBC News, Alabama
Democrats here in Alabama knew they had no chance of stopping this controversial bill, but that only seemed to make the debate on the senate floor even more heated. Activists packed the senate gallery to watch the drama play out – reacting with laughter and gasps in turn.
The few women who spoke on the floor were quick to highlight a key fact: this decision about women’s bodies was being made almost entirely by men.
As one female lawmaker introduced a sure-to-fail amendment to the bill to make it illegal for men to get vasectomies, the gallery and overflow watch room upstairs burst into laughter.
Image copyright Reuters Image caption Pro-choice protesters gathered outside the senate building On the senate floor, when the amendment failed, the lawmaker made her point, saying: We have never policed men’s bodies the way we do women’s.
Just outside the stark white walls of the state legislature were still more pro-choice advocates, raising signs that called for women’s equality, for protecting Planned Parenthood, for men to stay out of women’s rights issues.
One exasperated young woman told me: “We’ve already had this vote about women before. In the 70s. Why are we here again now?”
What restrictions are other states enacting? Earlier this year the governors of four states – Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi and Ohio – signed bills banning abortion if an embryonic heartbeat can be detected.
Opponents say this amounts to a ban on abortion because cardiac activity in an embryo can be detected as early as the sixth week, before a woman may be aware that she is pregnant.
You may also be interested in: S Korea ‘must end abortion ban’ Woman jailed over stillbirth is freed Concerns as Irish abortion services start The Guttmacher Institute, which campaigns for reproductive rights, says none of these bans are yet in effect, but their introduction is part of the same strategy to get the cases heard by the Supreme Court, it says.
Overall 28 states are currently considering legislation that would ban abortion in a variety of ways, it says.
What reaction has there been? Dr Yashica Robinson, who is one of the few doctors left providing abortion in Alabama, told BBC Radio Four’s PM programme that she would continue to do her job while fighting for women’s access to abortion in the state.
“I will still be here taking care of women and doing the things I can legally do,” she said. “Then, I will be helping women to the places they need to be in order to get the healthcare that they desire or need if they are going to make it difficult here.”
Alabama Democratic state Senator Bobby Singleton said the bill “criminalises doctors” and was an attempt by men “to tell women what to do with their bodies”.
Several Democratic presidential hopefuls also reacted on social media, including Kamala Harris.
Skip Twitter post by @KamalaHarris Republican lawmakers in states like Louisiana, Alabama, and Missouri are actively working to eliminate women’s access to safe, legal abortion. It’s a direct effort to criminalize women for their health care decisions. This is unacceptable.
— Kamala Harris (@KamalaHarris) May 14, 2019 Report End of Twitter post by @KamalaHarris
The National Organization for Women called the ban “unconstitutional” and said it was “a transparent effort to drum up political support for anti-abortion candidates in upcoming elections”.
Staci Fox of Planned Parenthood Southeast Advocates called the decision “a dark day for women in Alabama and across this country”.
In a statement she said Alabama politicians would “forever live in infamy for this vote and we will make sure that every woman knows who to hold accountable”.
What is access to abortion like in the US? There are currently three abortion clinics in Alabama, down from more than 20 in the 1990s, according to pro-choice campaigners.
What US ruling may mean for Roe v Wade Why are people talking about NY’s abortion law? The women looking outside the law for abortions Other states have seen similar falls in the number of abortion clinics and in 2017, six states reportedly had just one abortion clinic in operation.
However states with liberal majorities are seeking safeguards to the right to abortion in their own constitutions.
Are you in Alabama? How are you affected by the issues in this story? haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk
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Fox News viewers more likely to support Bernie Sanders than MSNBC’s – Business Insider

Mark Makela/Getty Images A new poll shows that Fox News viewers are more likely to support Sen. Bernie Sanders than those who typically get their news from MSNBC. Every other 2020 Democratic included in the poll had more support among MSNBC viewers than those who tend to watch Fox. Sanders did a town hall with Fox News last month, and other 2020 Democrats are following his lead. Fox News viewers are more likely to back Sen. Bernie Sanders than people who tend to watch MSNBC, according to a new Morning Consult poll. The poll found that 22% of Fox News viewers who also identified as potential Democratic primary voters back Sanders compared to just 13% of MSNBC viewers. Sanders was an outlier in this regard, as every other 2020 Democratic included in the poll had more support among MSNBC viewers than those who tend to watch Fox News. The only candidate with more support among Fox News viewers than Sanders was Joe Biden (42%), but the former vice president also had more support among MSNBC viewers overall (44%). Read more: Nearly half of Republicans say it bothers them to hear a foreign language in public Fox News tends to present a conservative perspective on issues and is President Donald Trump’s preferred broadcaster, making it somewhat surprising a significant portion of its viewers would support a self-declared democratic socialist like Sanders. Meanwhile, MSNBC is a network that appeals to liberals. A Pew Research Center survey from January 2017, for example, found most Trump voters got their news from Fox while MSNBC was the No. 2 choice for people who backed former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Sanders did a town hall with Fox News last month, which was seen as a major success for both the senator and the network with over 2.5 million viewers.

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Tim Conway, American comedy star, dead at 85 News

Emmy-winning actor Tim Conway, who brought an endearing, free-wheeling goofiness to skits on The Carol Burnett Show that cracked up his castmates as well as the audience, died on Tuesday at the age of 85, his publicist said.
Publicist Howard Bragman said Conway died in the Los Angeles area on Tuesday morning. Prior to his death, he had suffered complications from normal pressure hydrocephalus (fluid in the brain) and had no signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s, Bragman said.
Conway won three Emmy awards for acting on the Carol Burnett show and a fourth as a writer in the 1960s and ’70s. He also won guest actor Emmys for a 1996 appearance on Coach and another in 2008 for 30 Rock .
Conway first found television fame on the 1960s comedy McHale’s Navy playing Ensign Parker, a befuddled by-the-book officer in a group of unconventional sailors in the Pacific during the Second World War.
He would find greater success in the comedy sketches on Burnett’s show starting in 1968.
Carol Burnett shares a laugh with Conway during the March 1978 taping of her final show in Los Angeles. ( George Brich/Associated Press) He was at his best with characters that were a little naive, clumsy or slow-witted, and especially when teamed with straight man Harvey Korman and given the chance to show off his improvisational and slapstick skills.
“Nobody could be with Tim and keep a straight face once he got on a roll,” Burnett said in a 2003 interview with the Television Academy Foundation.
She said Conway would stick with a sketch’s script through dress rehearsal but once it was time to tape the performance for a broadcast, he began freelancing. His improvised antics often reduced his co-stars — especially his close friend Korman — to tears of laughter.
Conway, right, often reduced his Carol Burnett Show co-stars, like good friend Harvey Korman, to tears of laughter. (David Yarnold/Associated Press) “I think Conway’s goal in life was to destroy Harvey,” Burnett told the Television Academy Foundation.
In one popular skit, Conway’s portrayal of an inept dentist who accidentally injects himself with painkiller resulted in Korman, who was playing the patient, laughing so hard that he wet his pants, Burnett said.
‘I’m in the only business I could be in’ Conway’s other most memorable recurring characters included an elderly man whose shuffling pace always caused trouble and Mr. Tudball, a businessman plagued by an indifferent and inept secretary played by Burnett.
Conway started on the show as a guest star in its first season in 1967 but did not officially become a regular until 1975.
“People have often asked me, ‘If you weren’t in show business, what would you be doing?'” Conway wrote in his memoir What’s So Funny?: My Hilarious Life .
“The truth is I don’t think there’s anything else I could be doing so the answer would have to be, nothing … I guess you could say I’m in the only business I could be in.”
Conway, centre, speaks on a 2007 Television Critics Association panel alongside host Dick Cavett, left, and Betty White. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images) His popularity on the The Carol Burnett show led to his own shows — a sitcom in 1970 and a variety show in 1980 — and they lasted about a year each. He said they failed because he was not comfortable being the star.
Comedian Harvey Korman dies at 81 Before Korman’s death in 2008 he and Conway toured with an act that featured stand-up comedy, recreations of their better-known skits and question-and-answer sessions with the audience.
His movie work included The World’s Greatest Athlete in 1973, The Apple Dumpling Gang in 1975, The Shaggy D.A. in 1976, The Prize Fighter in 1979 and Private Eyes in 1980.
Conway also starred in the Dorf series of short videos as a sawed-off golf instructor, borrowing the accent his Mr. Tudball character used. He said Dorf was one of his favourite characters.
Conway, who was born on Dec. 15, 1933, grew up near Cleveland and, after serving in the U.S. Army, worked in Cleveland radio and developed comedy routines.
Actress Rose Marie, a co-star on The Dick Van Dyke Show , liked his work and helped him get a regular spot on The Steve Allen Show in the early 1960s.

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Alabama to vote on bill banning abortion – BBC News

Alabama passes bill banning abortion 15 May 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Pro-choice groups say they will challenge the bill Alabama has become the latest US state to move to restrict abortions by passing a bill to outlaw the procedure in almost all cases.
The law includes a ban on abortion in cases of rape or incest.
Supporters say they expect the law to be blocked in court but hope that the appeals process will bring it before the Supreme Court.
They want the court, which now has a conservative majority, to overturn the 1973 ruling legalising abortion.
Alabama’s 35-seat senate is dominated by men, and none of its four female senators backed the ban which will now go to Governor Kay Ivey.
She has said she will only decide whether or not to sign it into law once she has considered the final version. ‘Sex strike’ urged in abortion law protest
Sixteen other states are seeking to impose new restrictions on abortion.
Earlier this year the Supreme Court blocked implementation of new abortion restrictions in Louisiana. However the ruling was made by a narrow margin and the case is due to be reviewed later this year. Why is this happening now?
The bill’s architects expect that it will be defeated in the lower courts, but hope that it will therefore eventually come before the Supreme Court.
They have been emboldened by the addition of two conservative justices nominated by President Donald Trump, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, who give the nine-member court a conservative majority.
Their aim, they say, is for the landmark 1973 Roe v Wade ruling to be undermined or overturned completely. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Alabama Senators such as Clyde Chambliss are ready to challenge Roe v Wade
Alabama’s Lieutenant Governor Will Ainsworth said: “Roe must be challenged, and I am proud that Alabama is leading the way.”
Eric Johnston, who founded the Alabama Pro-Life Coalition that helped draft the bill, told NPR: “The dynamic has changed.
“The judges have changed, a lot of changes over that time, and so I think we’re at the point where we need to take a bigger and a bolder step.” What is in the Alabama bill?
Under the bill, doctors face 10 years in prison for attempting to terminate a pregnancy and 99 years for carrying out the procedure.
A woman who has an abortion would not be held criminally liable, and abortion in cases where the mother’s life is at serious risk are allowed. You may also be interested in:

Read More…