Pete Buttigieg takes to Fox News and slams Fox News – CNNPolitics

Pete Buttigieg takes to Fox News and slams Fox News – CNNPolitics

(CNN) Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg used a Fox News town hall in New Hampshire on Sunday to slam two of the network’s primetime opinion hosts, knocking both Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham by name on the network where they each host an hour.
The moment came when the South Bend, Indiana, mayor was trying to explain why he agreed to do a town hall with Fox News, something that other Democrats — namely Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren — have said they would not do because of the network’s near constant attacks against the party, and, as Warren said, because the network has mixed “bigotry, racism, and outright lies with enough legit journalism to make the claim to advertisers that it’s a reputable news outlet.” “There is a reason why anyone has to swallow hard and think twice about participating in this media ecosystem,” Buttigieg said after hitting Carlson for saying immigrants make the country dirty and Ingraham comparing detention centers with children to summer camps. “Even though some of those hosts are not there in good faith, I think a lot of people tune into this network who do it in good faith,” he said, adding that Democrats “can’t blame” Fox viewers if “they are ignoring our message because they will never hear it if we don’t go on and talk about it.” A spokeswoman for Fox News did not respond to CNN’s request for comment. Read More Democrats have been in the middle of a public and ongoing debate about whether 2020 candidates should agree to headline a town hall hosted by Fox News. Warren publicly rejected an invitation to participate in a town hall on Fox News, saying the conservative network is a “hate-for-profit racket” that’s in business to harm the Democratic Party. Elizabeth Warren is rejecting Fox News, but most of her rivals aren’t California Sen. Kamala Harris, too, has rejected Fox News’ offer. “They’ve reached out but we haven’t entertained it,” a campaign spokesperson said earlier this month. But other candidates either have agreed to headline a town hall like Buttigieg, or said they would do just that, arguing that Democrats should make appeals to Fox’s audience. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders headlined a Fox News town hall in April and New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is slated to headline a Fox News town hall in June. “If you’re not using your town hall, I will,” former Maryland Rep. John Delaney tweeted at Warren on Tuesday. “Democratic candidates have to campaign everywhere and talk to voters.” The Democratic National Committee announced in March that they would not allow Fox News to host any of the Democratic debates during the 2020 cycle, arguing that President Donald Trump and the network have a mutually beneficial relationship that, in the word of DNC Chair Tom Perez, was “inappropriate.” Buttigieg directly attacked Trump, Fox News’ most high-profile viewer, who pre-butted Buttigieg’s town hall by attacking the network for hosting the event. “Hard to believe that @FoxNews is wasting airtime on Mayor Pete, as Chris Wallace likes to call him. Fox is moving more and more to the losing (wrong) side in covering the Dems,” Trump wrote. “They got dumped from the Democrats boring debates, and they just want in. They forgot the people who got them there.” Buttigieg, asked by Wallace about tweets like those from Trump, responded bluntly: “I don’t care.” “It is a very effective way to command the attention of the media. We need to make sure we are changing the channel,” Buttigieg said before admitting that he finds it hard to turn away from all that Trump does and says at times. “It is the nature of grotesque things that you can’t look away,” he said. Buttigieg also used the Fox News town hall to talk about his position on abortion, an issue that Wallace pressed the Indiana Democrat on. “I trust women to draw the line when it is their own body,” Buttigieg said in response to a question about states looking to ease restrictions on abortion. When Wallace pressed Buttigieg on states that are trying to tighten abortions laws, the mayor said, “I believe that the right of a woman to make her own decisions about her own reproductive health and her own body is a national right, I believe it is an American freedom.” Buttigieg also signaled that he was comfortable with allowing abortions in the third trimester, saying it was important to put yourself “in the shoes of a woman in that situation.” “If it’s that late in your pregnancy, then it’s almost — by definition — you’ve been expecting to carry it to term. We’re talking about women who have perhaps chosen a name. Women who have purchased a crib and families that then get the most devastating medical news of their lifetime, something about the health or the life of the mother that forces them to make an impossible, unthinkable choice,” he said. “And the bottom line is … that decision is not going to be made any better medically or morally because the government is dictating how that decision should be made.” UPDATE: This story has been updated with additional context around Elizabeth Warren’s position on Fox News.

Read More…

Thousands of jobs at risk with British Steel on brink of collapse | Business News | Sky News

Britain’s second-largest steel producer is on the brink of collapse amid growing signs that an emergency government loan would fail to materialise, putting a total of close to 25,000 jobs at risk.
Sky News has learnt that British Steel, its lenders and Whitehall are preparing for an insolvency to take place within 48 hours, with EY expected to be formally appointed as administrators on Wednesday unless a deal is struck by Tuesday afternoon.
If last-minute talks fail to secure a solvent deal, British Steel’s collapse could result in more than 4,000 redundancies at its giant Scunthorpe steelworks, job cuts at its other sites, and as many as 20,000 more jobs in its supply chain also jeopardised by the crisis.
Image: The company was seeking a taxpayer loan to avoid collapse Insiders said that a request to the government for emergency financial support had been reduced from £75m to around £30m, with British Steel’s shareholder – Greybull Capital – and lenders agreeing to inject new money into the company.
Lenders are also understood to have released their security in order for a new government loan to be made on secured terms.
Advertisement Sources cautioned that after days of brinkmanship between the different stakeholders, a compromise could yet be struck, although they conceded that such an outcome looked increasingly unlikely.
One said that British Steel’s lenders and directors had resolved to place the company into administration on Wednesday if a final deadline for a deal on Tuesday afternoon was not met.
More from Business Jamie Oliver’s restaurants crash leaving 1,300 jobs at risk The surprising facts behind the declining UK steel industry Huawei founder: US actions ‘underestimate our abilities’ Trainline to get investors on board for £1.5bn float Some EE customers unable to make calls in 4G outage £27m lost in cryptocurrency ‘scammers’ paradise’ The lurch towards insolvency comes just days after a statement by British Steel appeared to indicate that it had sufficient financial support to survive for the foreseeable future.
Last Thursday, the company said that it had the backing of shareholders and lenders with operations continuing as normal.
Sky’s economics editor Ed Conway explains the demise of the steel industry in the UK.
“As the business navigates the significant uncertainties caused by Brexit, and explores options to strengthen the business for the long term, we are pleased to confirm that we have the required liquidity while we work towards a permanent solution.
“We are grateful for the support that our stakeholders and the British government have provided to date.”
However, talks with Business Secretary Greg Clark and his officials are said to have stalled the last few days, with a series of missed deadlines, leading British Steel’s directors to determine that an insolvency process is all but unavoidable.
If confirmed, the bankruptcy of such a major employer in Lincolnshire, with a steel plant dating back more than 150 years, would be a shattering blow both to the local economy and the national industry.
It would ignite a fresh row about the extent to which the absence of a Brexit deal is constraining the ability of British exporters to trade with European customers, and will also raise questions about recent financial arrangements entered into between the government and British Steel.
Sky News revealed last week that the company was seeking a loan of up to £75m from the government, with the outline terms said to have been agreed alongside a £120m bridging loan announced by Mr Clark on 1 May to help British Steel pay an EU carbon emissions bill.
Delays to the second part of the funding support, however, prompted some existing lenders to question whether to call in their loans.
Sources said that talks involving British Steel, Greybull and its lenders were continuing late into Monday night.
They added that a slump in orders from European customers ‎amid uncertainty about potential trading arrangements with the EU in the event of a no-deal Brexit was among the factors responsible for the company’s deteriorating performance.
Image: British Steel has declined to comment British Steel has also been adversely affected by sterling’s weakness and the escalating tariff war between the US and China, analysts said.
In a worst-case scenario, British Steel’s collapse could trigger the end of steel production at Scunthorpe unless a buyer or new investors are found for the business.
The official receiver is said to have been notified about the ongoing situation, partly because of the significant environmental risks associated with the possible decommissioning of such a major industrial site.
British Steel’s Scunthorpe site, which is responsible for producing 2.8m tonnes of steel each year, is the biggest supplier to Network Rail.
Last autumn, the company axed about 10% of its 5000-strong workforce in what it said was an attempt to “streamline” its operations and preserve its long-term future.
Nic Dakin, the local Labour MP, said at the time that the government had failed to provide the steel industry with adequate support.
On Monday, ministers attempted to rebut those suggestions by signing a charter aimed at maximising the amount of UK-produced steel used in British construction and infrastructure projects.
The crisis comes less than two weeks after a joint venture between Tata Steel and Germany’s Thyssenkrupp was abandoned amid opposition from the EU, raising renewed doubts about the future ownership of Tata’s steelworks at Port Talbot.
Collectively, the uncertain fate of the UK’s two largest steel plants heralds further anxiety for steelworkers, thousands of whom have already been forced to agree pay and pension cuts to keep their employers afloat.
The Scunthorpe site is a pivotal part of the UK’s steel production capability, and its purchase from Tata Steel ‎by the private investment firm Greybull almost exactly three years ago was seen as a landmark moment in signalling investor confidence in the industry’s prospects.
Mr Clark, who made a statement in the House of Commons on 1 May about the carbon emissions loan, said the decision to intervene was supported by the independent industrial development advisory board.
Why the UK steel industry is facing another fight for survival Sky’s Ian King explains the pressures on the steel industry in the UK, as British Steel goes cap in hand to ministers
Unless the bill had been settled by the end of April, British Steel would have been hit by “an immediate and unremovable fine of half a billion pounds”, he added.
Mr Clark described the decision to purchase the necessary carbon credits on British Steel’s behalf was “a unique one in exceptional circumstances”.
British Steel was brought back from the brink of closure after being acquired from the Indian giant Tata Steel in 2016.
The company broke even in its ‎first year after Greybull’s takeover and has reported positive earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation in each year since then.
British Steel, Greybull and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy all declined to comment.

Read More…

Man arrested in Newcastle after throwing milkshake at Nigel Farage | Politics News | Sky News

A 32-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of common assault after throwing a milkshake at Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage in Newcastle.
Mr Farage had just given a speech at the city’s Monument as part of his party’s campaign tour, ahead of Thursday’s European Parliament elections, when he was attacked by a protester.
The attacker was identified as Paul Crowther, 32, from Newcastle, who said the banana and salted caramel milkshake he used was from burger chain Five Guys, and cost £5.25.
Moment Nigel Farage hit with milkshake
Following the incident, he said: “I didn’t know he was in town, I thought this is my only chance.
“It’s a right of protest against people like him.”
Advertisement “The bile and the racism he spouts out in this country is far more damaging than a bit of milkshake to his front,” added Crowther, who is a customer service adviser for Sky, the owner of Sky News, according to his Facebook page.
After his arrest, he said he did not regret his actions, adding: “I was quite looking forward to it [the milkshake], but I think it went on a better purpose.”
More from Brexit No-deal Brexiteers want to ‘hijack’ referendum result, says Chancellor Contest to replace Theresa May as PM could expose Tories’ few good options Race to succeed Theresa May kicks off with split over no-deal Brexit Theresa May to pitch ‘bold’ new Brexit offer in final bid to win cross-party support ‘Fed up’ grassroots Tories refuse to campaign for European elections Change UK: Revoke Article 50 to hold second Brexit referendum Mr Farage tweeted after the incident, saying: “Sadly some remainers have become radicalised, to the extent that normal campaigning is becoming impossible.
“For a civilised democracy to work you need the losers consent, politicians not accepting the referendum result have led us to this.”
Following the attack, he could be heard asking security staff: “How did you not stop that?”
A Northumbria Police spokesperson said: “A 32-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of common assault and remains in police custody.”
Listen to “Sophy Ridge on Sunday” on Spreaker. :: Listen to Sophy Ridge on Sunday on Apple podcasts , Google podcasts , Spotify , and Spreaker
Meanwhile, a spokesperson for Sky said: “We are investigating the incident but cannot comment further at this stage.”
The attack comes after a McDonald’s branch in Edinburgh was asked by police not to sell milkshakes, due to a Brexit Party rally close by.
Image: Politicians have been targeted by milkshake attackers At the same time, Burger King tweeted to remind their Scottish customers that they will continue to sell the dairy beverages, drawing criticism from some people.
Mr Farage becomes the latest politician to have the drink doused on him, joining figures such as UKIP’s Carl Benjamin and independent European candidate Tommy Robinson.
The incident has reignited the debate over when a protest crosses the line.
Sky News spoke Brendan Cox, the husband of murdered MP Jo Cox, who said that while he recognised the incident as a “bit of a joke”, that the current climate of “political intimidation” means such an act should be taken more seriously.
“I do think we have to make sure we stop this here and that we say that yes, of course protesting is absolutely legitimate, but throwing things at politicians or hurling abuse at them frankly isn’t,” he said.

Read More…

Formula 1 legend Niki Lauda dies aged 70 | World News | Sky News

Formula 1 legend Niki Lauda has died at the age of 70, his family has said.
The Austrian – a three-time world champion and the only man to have won the drivers’ title for both Ferrari and McLaren – passed away on Monday, less than a year after undergoing a lung transplant.
In a touching statement, his family said the racer-turned-flight entrepreneur would “remain a role model and a benchmark for all of us”.
‘The biggest comeback in sport’: Tributes paid to ‘true icon’ Niki Lauda McLaren, Ferrari and former F1 champion Jenson Button are among those hailing the ‘true legend’
Image: Lauda, seen with Lewis Hamilton, was a regular at F1 races in recent years Image: Lauda is considered one of the all-time great F1 drivers F1 world champion Lewis Hamilton paid tribute to the racing legend on Facebook, saying he was “struggling to believe” the news and would miss their “big hugs after winning races together”.
Quote: : “It’s truly been an honour working alongside you over these past seven years. I wouldn’t have ever been in this team if it wasn’t for you.”
Advertisement He signed off as “your friend always, Lewis”.
Lauda won his first F1 championship in 1975, and was on course to retain his title the following year until a horrific near-fatal crash at the German Grand Prix at the famous Nurburgring.
He suffered severe burns to his head and face and suffered lung damage from inhaling toxic gases when his Ferrari burst into flames during the race, which came a week after he had urged his fellow drivers to boycott the event over safety concerns at the track.
Image: Lauda in 1975, prior to his crash at the Nurburgring Image: Lauda was rarely seen without a cap due to severe burns he suffered after a crash at the Nurburgring The burns he suffered were the reason he was hardly ever seen without a cap from that point onward, as he wanted to hide the scarring.
Lauda made a successful return to F1 after his remarkable recovery – missing just two races before his comeback – and narrowly missed out on successive championships at the hands of British driver James Hunt.
The pair forged one of the fiercest rivalries in motorsport history and it inspired the award-winning 2013 film Rush, starring German actor Daniel Bruhl as Lauda and Chris Hemsworth as Hunt.
Image: Lauda (left) forged a memorable rivalry with British racer James Hunt Image: Lauda celebrates winning the British GP at Brands Hatch in 1982 Lauda won his second championship in 1977 and his third in 1984, before retiring in 1985.
He had originally hung up his helmet six years prior to focus on his airline, Lauda Air, which he founded in 1979.
Lauda owned the company until 2000, when it became part of Austrian Airlines, and it ceased to exist in 2013, but he went on to take over Amira Air in 2016 and rename it to LaudaMotion.
Image: The Mercedes team – featuring Lauda – celebrates winning a constructors’ championship Image: Lauda with German F1 star Sebastian Vettel Aside from his airline businesses, Lauda took on several management roles within F1 following his retirement, including becoming the non-executive chairman of the Mercedes team in September 2012.
He took part in negotiations that saw Lewis Hamilton sign a three-year deal with Mercedes in 2013, and the Briton has since won four championships.
Lauda remained a consistent presence at F1 races in recent years, but took time away from the sport after undergoing a successful lung transplant for a “serious lung illness” in Vienna last summer.
Image: Lauda addresses a news conference presenting his airline Laudamotion Image: Lauda with fellow F1 legend Michael Schumacher in 2010 He was married to Birgit Wetzinger, who was a flight attendant for his airline and donated a kidney to him when one he received from his brother in 1997 failed.
Lauda had five children – two sons with his first wife, Mathias and Lukas, another son, Christoph, and Ms Wetzinger gave birth to twins, a boy and a girl, in 2009.
Image: Lauda with his wife Birgit Wetzinger Image: Wetzinger donated a kidney to Lauda when one he received from his brother in 1997 failed Tributes have begun to flood in from F1 stars past and present since news of his death broke, including from British racing driver Jenson Button, who tweeted: “A legend has left us. Rest in peace Niki.”
McLaren said it was “deeply saddened” to learn of his death, adding that Lauda would “forever be in our hearts and enshrined in our history”.

Read More…

Jamie Oliver’s restaurants crash leaving 1,300 jobs at risk | Business News | Sky News

Well over 1,000 jobs are at risk as the restaurant chain set up by the celebrity chef Jamie Oliver crashes into administration just two years after narrowly averting an earlier collapse.
Sky News has learnt that Mr Oliver’s Jamie’s Italian chain and his other venues have lined up KPMG to handle an insolvency process.
The move puts as many as 1,300 jobs at risk and deal a blow to the television chef whose inimitable style and entrepreneurial zeal has earned him a vast fortune during the last 20 years.
Image: Jamie’s Italian in Richmond was among six sites to be closed in 2017 Sources said that the administration process would encompass Mr Oliver’s remaining Barbecoa sites as well as Fifteen London, the site he launched after he was catapulted to fame through his Naked Chef TV programme.
The insolvency process is likely to leave HSBC, the company’s principal bank lender, nursing a multimillion-pound loss.
Advertisement KPMG is likely to lead a search for a new owner, which will come after Mr Oliver’s business launched a restructuring process in 2017 to shed a number of loss-making sites .
The insolvency of Jamie’s Italian and its related brands comes amid a torrid time for high street casual dining chains.
More from Business Thousands of jobs at risk with British Steel on brink of collapse Huawei founder: US actions ‘underestimate our abilities’ Trainline to get investors on board for £1.5bn float Some EE customers unable to make calls in 4G outage £27m lost in cryptocurrency ‘scammers’ paradise’ Tesco Bank stops selling mortgages and seeks exit Cau has disappeared, with its parent Gaucho being restructured, and other chains, including Prezzo and Carluccio’s have also been forced into widespread outlet closures.
A spokesperson for the Jamie Oliver Group said: “The board of Jamie’s Italian Limited has appointed Will Wright and Mark Orton of KPMG to put its UK-based restaurant business into administration.
Image: Jamie Oliver is a well-known TV chef and campaigner on issues such as healthy school dinners Jamie Oliver Holdings, which operates Jamie Oliver Limited and Jamie Oliver Licensing Limited, as well as the international restaurant franchise business, Jamie’s Italian International Limited, will continue to trade as normal.
“Fifteen Cornwall, which operates under a franchise, is also unaffected.”
Jamie Oliver responded: “I am deeply saddened by this outcome and would like to thank all of the staff and our suppliers who have put their hearts and souls into this business for over a decade.
“I appreciate how difficult this is for everyone affected.
“I would also like to thank all the customers who have enjoyed and supported us over the last decade, it’s been a real pleasure serving you.
“We launched Jamie’s Italian in 2008 with the intention of positively disrupting mid-market dining in the UK high street, with great value and much higher quality ingredients, best in class animal welfare standards and an amazing team who shared my passion for great food and service. And we did exactly that.”
KPMG declined to comment.

Read More…