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Trump ties US success to 2nd term: ‘You have to vote for me’
By KEVIN FREKING | 09:42 EDT
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — President Donald Trump on Thursday sought to reassure his supporters about the state of the U.S. economy despite the stock market volatility and told rallygoers in New Hampshire, a state that he hopes to capture in 2020, that their financial security depends on his reelection.
“Whether you love me or hate me you have to vote for me,” Trump said.
Speaking to a boisterous crowd at Southern New Hampshire University, Trump dismissed the heightened fears about the U.S. economy and a 3% drop Wednesday in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which was fueled by a slowing global economy and a development in the bond market that has predicted previous recessions. Avoiding an economic slump is critical to Trump’s reelection hopes.
“The United States right now has the hottest economy anywhere in the world,” Trump said.
Trump, who reached the White House by promising to bring about a historic economic boom, claimed, as he often does, that the markets would have crashed if he had lost his 2016 bid for the presidency. And he warned that if he is defeated in 2020, Americans’ 401(k) retirement accounts will go “down the tubes.”
The president also defended his tactics on trade with China. He has imposed 25% tariffs on $250 billion of imports from China and has threatened to hit the remaining $300 billion worth of Chinese imports with 10% tariffs. He has delayed that increase on about half of those items to avoid raising prices for U.S. holiday shoppers. He said China wants to make a trade deal with the U.S. because it’s costing the country millions of jobs, but claimed that the U.S. doesn’t need to be in a hurry.
“I don’t think we’re ready to make a deal,” Trump said.
Trump’s rally was the first since mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, killed 31 people and wounded dozens more. The shootings have reignited calls for Congress to take immediate action to reduce gun violence. Trump said the U.S. can’t make it more difficult for law-abiding citizens to protect themselves, but he advocated for expanding the number of facilities to house the mentally ill without saying how he would pay for it.
“We will be taking mentally deranged and dangerous people off of the streets so we won’t have to worry so much about them,” Trump said. “We don’t have those institutions anymore, and people can’t get proper care. There are seriously ill people and they’re on the streets.”
Along with discussion of the economy and guns, Trump hit a number of other topics, accusing the European Union of being “worse than China, just smaller”; bragging about his 2016 electoral victories in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania; and calling it a “disgrace” that people were throwing water on police officers in New York.
The rally was interrupted about a half an hour in by a handful of protesters near the rafters of the arena. As the protesters were being led out, a Trump supporter wearing a “Trump 2020” shirt near them began enthusiastically shaking his fist in a sign of support for the president.
But Trump mistook him for one of the protesters and said to the crowd: “That guy’s got a serious weight problem. Go home. Start exercising. Get him out of here, please.”
After a pause, he added, “Got a bigger problem than I do.”
New Hampshire, which gave Trump his first GOP primary victory but favored Hillary Clinton in the 2016 general election, is doing well economically, at least when using broad measures. But beneath the top-line data are clear signs that the prosperity is being unevenly shared, and when the tumult of the Trump presidency is added to the mix, the state’s flinty voters may not be receptive to his appeals.
An August University of New Hampshire Survey Center poll found that 42% of New Hampshire adults approve of Trump while 53% disapprove. The poll also showed that 49% approve of Trump’s handling of the economy and 44% disapprove.
Some Democratic presidential campaigns are holding events to capitalize on Trump’s trip. Joe Biden’s campaign set up down the street from the arena to talk to voters and enlist volunteers. A group for Pete Buttigieg’s campaign gathered in nearby Concord to call voters about his support for new gun safety laws. And Cory Booker urged Trump to cancel the speech and instead order Congress to take immediate action to prevent gun violence.
At 2.4%, New Hampshire’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for May was among the lowest in the nation. But wage growth is significantly below national gains. Average hourly earnings rose a scant 1.1% in New Hampshire in 2018, lagging the 3% gain nationwide, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
In other ways, like the home ownership rate — first in the nation — and median household income — seventh in the U.S. — the state is thriving, according to census data.
New Hampshire’s four Electoral College votes are far below that of key swing states like Florida, Wisconsin and Michigan, but its influence can prove powerful in close election years like 2000, when George W. Bush’s victory in the state gave him the edge needed to win the White House.
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AP Economics Writer Josh Boak and AP Polling Editor Emily Swanson in Washington and Associated Press writer Hunter Woodall in Manchester, N.H., contributed to this report.
Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Kashmir: Fire across LoC ‘kills 3 Pakistani, 5 Indian troops’ | Kashmir News News | Al Jazeera

Casualties rise to six in last 24 hours, says Pakistan army, adding that five Indian soldiers were killed on Thursday. 16 Aug 2019 05:42 GMT Nuclear-armed India and Pakistan have fought two of their three wars over the disputed territory of Kashmir [File: Channi Anand/AP] Pakistan’s army has said Indian troops fired across the Line of Control (LoC) in the disputed Kashmir region, killing another soldier and bringing the death toll to six in less than 24 hours. On Thursday, Pakistan said at least three of its soldiers and five Indian soldiers were killed, in addition to two civilians on the Pakistan side, after a cross-border exchange of fire in the disputed region, prompting a denial by New Delhi that there were fatalities among its forces. In a tweet on Friday, Pakistan army spokesman General Asif Ghafoor said “another brave son of soil lost his life in the line of duty” in Buttal town.
“Intermittent exchange of fire continues,” Ghafoor tweeted on Thursday.
He confirmed to Al Jazeera that the casualty figure on Thursday included three civilians. In efforts to divert attention from precarious situation in IOJ&K,Indian Army increases firing along LOC.3 Pakistani soldiers embraced shahadat. Pakistan Army responded effectively. 5 Indian soldiers killed, many injured, bunkers damaged. Intermittent exchange of fire continues. pic.twitter.com/wx1RoYdiKE — DG ISPR (@OfficialDGISPR) August 15, 2019
An Indian army spokesperson denied the Pakistani army’s statement on Thursday. “No casualties. This assertion is wrong,” the spokesperson was quoted as saying by Reuters news agency.
In a statement quoted by news agencies, the Indian army said that from about 7am Pakistan violated a ceasefire between the two nations in the heavily militarised LoC. Kashmir status scrapped
The developments come during a period of increasing tensions between India and Pakistan after New Delhi’s Hindu nationalist government last week revoked special status for Indian-administered Kashmir.
The decision by India blocks the right of the Muslim-majority state of Jammu and Kashmir to frame its own laws and allows non-residents to buy property there.
Telephone lines, internet and television networks have been blocked and there are restrictions on movement and assembly. 190815053324652
In the lead-up to its controversial move on August 5, India also deployed thousands of additional troops and arrested political leaders in Indian-administered Kashmir.
Nuclear-armed India and Pakistan have fought two of their three wars over the disputed territory of Kashmir.
” Details are emerging that there were some damage to homes in the area. Tensions remain high on this border,” Al Jazeera’s Osama Bin Javaid, reporting from Muzaffarabad in Pakistan-administered Kashmir, said.
“We’ve have been visiting some of these villages, where people have been telling us it is very difficult for normal life to continue there because they live under constant fear.”
On Wednesday, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan addressed the local legislative assembly of the Pakistan-administered Kashmir in Muzaffarabad.
He said the time had come to teach New Delhi a lesson and promised to “fight until the end” against any Indian aggression.
Khan has also likened India’s moves in Kashmir to Nazi Germany, accused them of ethnic cleansing, and appealed to the international community to take action.
Pakistan formally asked the United Nations Security Council late on Tuesday to hold an emergency session to address the situation. 190814120848149
Islamabad has also expelled the Indian ambassador, halted bilateral trade and suspended cross-border transport services.
“I think there is huge lack of trust on the part of the Kashmiri people and more importantly because India jailed a number of moderate pro-India politicians and leaders of the political party, there are really no intermediaries between the Muslim majority population of Indian citizens in the Kashmir valley,” Adnan Naseemullah, a senior lecturer at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
“That I think, the lack of ability for representation, to be part of this process, is also going to be very concerning in terms of economic development moving forward.”
Earlier this year Pakistan and India came close to all-out conflict yet again, after a “militant” attack in Indian-administered Kashmir in February was claimed by a group based in Pakistan, igniting tit-for-tat air attacks. UNSC move
The UNSC is due to meet behind closed doors on Friday at the request of China and Pakistan to discuss India’s decision to revoke the special status of Jammu and Kashmir, diplomats said.
Any action by the 15-member council is unlikely as the United States traditionally backs India and China supports Pakistan. 190805054643431
“Pakistan will not provoke a conflict. But India should not mistake our restraint for weakness,” Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi wrote in a letter to the UNSC on Tuesday.
“If India chooses to resort again to the use of force, Pakistan will be obliged to respond, in self-defense, with all its capabilities.”
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called on India and Pakistan to refrain from any steps that could affect the special status of Jammu and Kashmir. Guterres also said he was concerned about reports of restrictions on the Indian side of Kashmir.
The council adopted several resolutions in 1948 and in the 1950s on the dispute between India and Pakistan over the region, including one which says a plebiscite should be held to determine the future of the mostly Muslim Kashmir.
Another resolution also calls upon both sides to “refrain from making any statements and from doing or causing to be done or permitting any acts which might aggravate the situation”. Is Pakistan able to counter India’s move in Kashmir?
SOURCE: Al Jazeera and news agencies

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Dale Earnhardt Jr. Rushed to Hospital After Plane Crashes in Tennessee | Entertainment Tonight

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The farmers who worry about our phone batteries – BBC News

The farmers who worry about our phone batteries By Grace Livingstone BBC Santiago, Chile 15 August 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image caption Sara Plaza has lived beside the vast salt flat all her life Out of habit, Sara Plaza smiles when her photo is taken, but when she talks about what has happened to the land around her home, tears start to run down her face.
“There used to be beautiful lagoons down there, with hundreds of flamingos,” she says. “When they opened their wing, you’d see their pretty pink and black feathers. Now it’s all dry and the birds have gone.”
Peine, the dusty village where she lives in northern Chile, sits on a hillside by the Salar de Atacama, an enormous 3,000 sq km (1,200 sq mile) salt flat in the driest desert on the planet.
Sara says that the villagers used to graze their animals on pastures on the edge of the Atacama, beneath the giant Andes mountains. Image caption The Salar de Atacama covers a huge area
“It used to be so green, now it’s just hard, cracked ground. We can’t keep llamas anymore,” she laments.
Sara says that lithium mining on the Atacama is using up all the fresh water in the region’s aquifers – layers of porous rock beneath the soil which act as stores of water.
Lithium, a soft, silvery-white metal is used to make batteries for smartphones, laptops and electric cars. Demand has soared in recent years, with global output rising three-fold since 2005 to 85,000 tonnes in 2018, according to the US Geological Survey.
Chile is the world’s second-largest producer after Australia, with an output of 16,000 tonnes last year, all from the Atacama. Valued at $949m (£785m) this was a 38% rise on 2017.
There are currently just two companies mining lithium here – a US firm, Albemarle, and Chile’s own SQM.
Beneath the salt flat is an enormous natural underground reservoir of salty water that contains dissolved lithium salts. To extract this, the miners pump this brine to the surface, and allow it to evaporate in the sun, leaving the lithium carbonate to be scooped up. This salt can then be turned into metallic lithium. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Albemarle and SQM pump brine into basins to extract lithium
While there are continuing concerns about the impact the extraction of this salt water is having on the wider ecosystem, including the claims that the flamingos’ salt water lagoons are drying up, the most pressing issue for Sara and other locals is that the mining firms are also accessing fresh water supplies.
They need the fresh water to clean machinery and pipes, and also to produce an auxiliary product from the brine – potash – which is used as a fertiliser.
Standing among yellowing tufts of grass that used to be pasture lands Sarah – who monitors water supplies for her indigenous community – points out a small pumping station that draws up underground fresh water and pipes it to the lithium mines.
About 40km (25 miles) further north, Jorge Cruz grows maize and alfalfa on a small plot of land in the village of Camar, another indigenous community near the salt flat.
He says that if the mining companies continue to use fresh water at the current rate his village will not survive.
“The birds have gone, we can’t keep animals anymore,” he says. “It’s getting harder and harder to grow crops. If it gets any worse… we will have to emigrate.”
Diego Hernandez, president of the Chilean mining society, Sonami, says that the amount of fresh water used by the lithium companies is insignificant. But he does agree that all water levels should be better monitored by the authorities. Image caption Jorge Cruz says he can no longer farm animals because of the lack of fresh water
“The government has no hydrological model of the whole aquifer,” he says. “It should be able to take informed decisions based on technical data. But in Chile we have more rules and laws than money to make it happen.”
Both Albemarle and SQM do their own monitoring of the ground water. Global Trade

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Famous dugong dies after eating plastic – BBC News

Famous dugong dies after eating plastic 17 August 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright AFP Image caption Mariam the dugong died from an infection caused by bit of plastic in her stomach An orphaned dugong, made famous after it was rescued earlier this year in Thailand, has died.
The animal named Mariam died on Saturday from an infection that was exacerbated by bits of plastic lining her stomach, according to officials.
Mariam became an internet star after images showed her nuzzling into rescuers when she became stranded on a beach in April.
There are only a few hundred of the sea mammals left in Thailand.
The eight-month-old dugong was found ill a week ago and refused to eat. She died around midnight on Saturday after going into shock. Efforts to resuscitate her failed.
Chaiyapruk Werawong, head of Trang province marine park, told AFP: “She died from a blood infection and pus in her stomach.” Turtles eat plastic they mistake for sea grass
During an autopsy, several pieces of plastic including one measuring 20cm (eight inches) were found inside her stomach.
Nantarika Chansue, one of the vets who looked at Mariam, said: “Everyone is saddened by the loss, but it reiterates that we need to save the environment to save these rare animals.”
Mariam featured in live webcasts alongside Jamil, another dugong rescued shortly after her. The webcasts showed her being fed and receiving treatment from vets.
Many people have shared their sadness at her death on social media. Skip Twitter post by @SSRU_PSU Good bye little princess Marium! You were #conservation superstar.It’s heartbreaking to see you die by the people’s neglect towards environment. We are all guilty, as each thrown #Plastic bag, straw, bottle is killing an animal somewhere #saynotoplastic #Dugong #plasticpollution pic.twitter.com/ejRWceKSJE

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