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Parent dispute leads to gunfire at youth football game in Texas

Parent dispute leads to gunfire at youth football game in Texas

Breaking News Emails Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings. SUBSCRIBE Sept. 14, 2019, 11:14 PM UTC By Dennis Romero A girl was grazed and a woman shot in a leg Saturday when a parent dispute led to gunfire at a youth football game in Fort Worth, Texas, police said.
This incident started as a parent dispute at a “pee wee football game,” Officer J. Pollozani of the Fort Worth Police Department said by email.
“It is believed, the son of one of the parents arrived at the location armed with a handgun and began discharging the firearm,” he said.
The gunfire broke out during the third quarter of a game between the Fort Worth Longhorns and the 81G Bulldogs at Eastern Hills High School, NBC News affiliate KXAS in Dallas-Fort Worth reported.
A mother upset over an on-field fight between players called an older son, who arrived and allegedly opened fire, the station reported. Witnesses reported hearing more than 10 rounds coming from a small hill nearby.
The victims were hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries, Pollozani said.
“The actor is still outstanding,” he said.
Dennis Romero Dennis Romero writes for NBC News and is based in Los Angeles.
Jay Varela contributed.

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Principal Delivers, Amazon Problems, CA Fires: Partner News | Patch

community corner Shared from Across America, US Principal Delivers, Amazon Problems, CA Fires: Patch Partner News California’s peak fire months are coming, Amazon has delivery problems, a Denver principal helps deliver a teacher’s baby:. By Colin Miner, Patch Staff Sep 13, 2019 1:34 pm Patch readers generate more than 80 million reads a month. If you want your contact out there, become a Patch Partner. (Patch Graphic) Every day, Patch brings stories to its readers from more than a dozen news and information partners. These organizations contributing to Patch range from Kaiser Health News to the Racine County Eye to Chalkbeat – and others, both local and national.
As much as a news organization, Patch is a publishing platform that would love to share your thoughts, ideas and information, too. Here is just a sample of some recent posts. If you’d like to appear on the Patch platform, and have your work be among the stories that attract more than 80 million reads each month, contact colin.miner@patch.com.
Feds Try To Block Philly’s Supervised Injection Site By Kaiser Health News
Philadelphia could become the first U.S. city to offer opioid users a place to inject drugs under medical supervision. But lawyers for the Trump administration are trying to block the effort, citing a 1980s-era law known as “the crackhouse statute.”
Justice Department lawyers argued in federal court Thursday against the nonprofit, Safehouse, which wants to open the site.
U.S. Attorney William McSwain , in a rare move, argued the case himself. He said Safehouse’s intended activities would clearly violate a portion of the federal Controlled Substances Act that makes it illegal to manage any site for the purpose of unlawfully using a controlled substance. The statute was added to the broader legislation in the mid-1980s at the height of the crack cocaine epidemic in American cities.
READ MORE HERE
What To Know As California’s Peak Fire Months Loom By CalMatters
History shows that September and October, with their hot, fierce winds, are the state’s worst times for fire
California fire officials have learned through hard experience to temper their optimism.
Having just endured more than a decade of rampaging fires — 14 of the 20 most destructive fires in state history have occurred since 2007 — fire bosses say this year the glass is half-full.
“We’ve got a few things going for us at the moment,” said Scott McLean, a spokesman for Cal Fire, the state firefighting agency. “We still have a snowpack. Our upper elevations haven’t dried out. Because of that, we are able to continue our fuel-reduction projects.”
READ MORE HERE
AZ Panel Questions Officials On Efforts To Help Native Women By Cronkite News
Arizona lawmakers questioned administration officials Wednesday on what they are doing to deal with the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women — and they weren’t always satisfied with the answer.
Officials with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the departments of Justice and Health and Human Services said they’re trying, but are often hampered by a lack of funding and inconsistent record-keeping when it comes to crimes against Native women.
“A missing person report that comes in isn’t necessarily a crime when it’s reported to one of our police departments out there, so we have to treat those with more … more of a response,” said Charles Addington, deputy director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Office of Justice Services.
READ MORE HERE
A Chicago Truck Delivering Holiday Packages; A Crash; A Family Never The Same By ProPublica
On the corner of 28th Street and Drake Avenue in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood, the family of Telesfora Escamilla created a shrine for their mother, decorating a tree with silk flowers, ribbons and Our Lady of Guadalupe candles.
Escamilla was in a crosswalk at that intersection three days before Christmas in 2016 when a driver delivering Amazon packages in a cargo van turned left and hit her. She died that day, two weeks shy of her 85th birthday.
The delivery driver, who was working for an Amazon contractor at the height of the holiday rush , was indicted on a felony charge of reckless homicide but was acquitted in a bench trial this summer. Escamilla’s children are suing Amazon, the contractor and the driver. The driver declined to comment; the contractor did not return calls seeking comment; and Amazon declined to comment.
READ MORE HERE
Denver Principal, Dean Deliver Teacher’s Baby — At School A new school year always means new beginnings, but one Denver middle school community took that more literally than most.
Sixth-grade reading teacher Lindsay Agbalokwu was expecting her first baby in early September, but when she woke up with mild contractions Tuesday, she wasn’t sure if she was really in labor. She went to work anyway at DSST: Conservatory Green, a charter school in northeast Denver.
But by the time the school’s morning assembly had wrapped up, it was clear that Agbalokwu wouldn’t be finishing out the day. Seventh-grade teacher Marissa Kast rushed to get her car, as Principal Natalie Lewis and Dean Chris Earls helped Agbalokwu down the stairs and out of the building.
READ MORE HERE
If you work at a news organization or a nonprofit and would like to partner with Patch, contact Patch’s Manager of News and Content Partnerships, Colin Miner, at Colin.Miner@Patch.com
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Stock market news: September 16, 2019

U.S. stocks tumbled and oil prices surged after attacks on Saudi Arabian oil facilities over the weekend led to massive supply disruptions out of one of the world’s largest production centers. The Dow was on track to break an eight-session winning streak.
Futures for Brent crude ( BZ=F ) – which serves as the international benchmark for oil prices – surged the most on record during intraday trading Monday, after the attacks took a hit to half of the kingdom’s oil output. Brent crude prices jumped by about $12 just after trading opened Monday, representing a nearly 20% price spike, before paring gains by the end of regular trading.
Here were the main moves in the market by the closing bell on the New York Stock Exchange:
S&P 500 ( ^GSPC ) -0.31%, or 9.43 points
Dow ( ^DJI ): -0.52%, or 142.7 points
Nasdaq ( ^IXIC ): -0.28%, or 23.17 points
U.S. crude oil prices ( CL=F ): +12.84% to $61.89 per barrel
10-year Treasury yield ( ^TNX ): -5.1 bps to 1.848%
Gold ( GC=F ): +0.52% to $1,507.3 per ounce
Drone strikes descended on two Saudi Arabian oil facilities on Saturday, knocking out 5.7 million barrels per day of production, or about 5% of global output. This was the single worst disruption in oil markets ever, exceeding both the impact from the Kuwaiti and Iraqi petroleum supply loss in 1990 during the Gulf War, as well as the oil crisis spurred by an Iranian output loss in the wake of the 1979 Islamic Revolution.
Saturday’s attacks led President Donald Trump on Sunday to authorize a release of crude from the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), in a move to offset the expected hit to supply. The SPR contains over 700 million barrels, and was last tapped in 2011 due to supply disruptions in Libya.
Houthi rebels in Yemen claimed responsibility for the attacks on Saturday. The military spokesperson for the group said 10 drones targeted Saudi Aramco oil facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais.
However, Trump administration officials have since pinned the strikes on Iran, which sponsors the Houthi rebels. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a Twitter post that “Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply,” and that “There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.” Iran has denied it was responsible for the raids.
Trump followed up with a Twitter post on Sunday saying, “There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification, but are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!”
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S. (REUTERS/Brendan McDermid) More Haven assets rallied Monday as investors weighed the prospects of a wider conflict, with the U.S. having already blamed Iran as the culprit behind a series of attacks on oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz – a major oil transportation hub – earlier this year. Gold, the Japanese yen and Swiss franc each rallied.
The 10-year Treasury yield, which often moves in the same direction as crude oil prices, instead fell on Monday as investors poured into less risky government debt. Bond prices move inversely to yields.
Transportation, airline and cruise operating companies’ stocks fell amid the rise in oil prices. Carnival Cruise Lines’s ( CCL ) stock fell 3.3%. Shares American Airlines ( AAL ) fell 7.3%, while shares of JetBlue ( JBLU ) and United Airlines ( UAL ) were off more than 2%.
According to a report from the Wall Street Journal Monday , the disruption has also led Saudi Arabian officials to mull a delay to Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering. The state-backed energy company had been scheduled to publicly list as soon as this year, in what was anticipated to be the largest IPO on record, with an expected IPO raise of around $100 billion.
The Saudi oil disruption has also thrust focus to the energy sector, which has been both a laggard to the S&P 500 this year and a sector carrying relatively little weight in the index overall. The energy sectors has risen 5.6% this year through Friday’s close, versus a gain of nearly 20% for the S&P 500.

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Ted Cruz: ‘Donald Trump has broken the Democratic Party’

Ted Cruz: ‘Donald Trump has broken the Democratic Party’ Washington Examiner 23 hrs ago Hunter Lovell Click to expand Replay Video UP NEXT It’s Morning, America: Monday, Sept. 16, 2019 Trump says U.S. is “locked and loaded” as officials blame Saudi oil attack on Iran, Democrats push for Kavanaugh impeachment and more. ABC News Police: New Jersey girl, 6, escapes attempted abduction after man placed paper bag over her head 6-year-old escapes attempted abduction FOX News Officer leads charity run 1 year after being shot Officer Matt Cooper led the annual “Fuzz Run” fundraising race in Covington, Georgia, one year after suffering a gunshot wound to the head. CNN 1 Cancel SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Sen. Ted Cruz on debate around gun control ABC News See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Sen. Ted Cruz on debate around gun control ABC News 10:22 It’s Morning, America: Monday, Sept. 16, 2019 ABC News 26:08 Police: New Jersey girl, 6, escapes attempted abduction after man placed paper bag over her head FOX News 0:45 Officer leads charity run 1 year after being shot CNN 0:59 What you need to know about climate change CBS News 10:32 Watch Brett Kavanaugh deny Ramirez allegations under oath in 2018 NBC News 0:45 2020 GOP Candidate Walsh on state primary cancellations MSNBC 4:26 Protesters scatter after Hong Kong police deploy tear gas, water cannon The Washington Post 0:39 No visible breakthrough in Brexit talks Associated Press 1:00 Russia jails novice actor for hurting policeman at protest Reuters 1:11 Cop sneaks up on, pranks fellow officer with realistic fake snake USA TODAY 0:34 Across the Pond: Protesters clash with police in Hong Kong ABC News 4:36 Videos of violent Minneapolis robberies go viral as city faces police shortage FOX News 1:40 Former NASCAR champion dies in plane crash CNN 0:57 David Ortiz speaks out about gunman attack CBS News 2:25 UAW Local 22 President on General Motors strike: ‘We need job security’ NBC News 2:22 UP NEXT
Republican Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos that President Trump has “broken the Democratic Party” and that Democrats are solely focused on “hating him.”
ABC host George Stephanopoulos mentioned Cruz’s warning that Texas could be a potential background state in the 2020 presidential election and noted that five Republican House members from the state have come forward saying they would not seek reelection next year.
Cruz claimed that the third Democratic presidential debate in Houston on Thursday was a “very bad night” for Democrats because the candidates did not mention the economy’s relative strength through the third quarter of this year.
“If you look at Thursday night, the entire night of the debate, not a single Democrat talked about jobs, not a single Democrat talked about the economy, about the fact that we’ve got the lowest African American unemployment ever recorded, the lowest Hispanic unemployment ever recorded,” Cruz said.
“Instead what the Democrats told the American people is they want to raise your taxes, they want to triple the price you pay for a gallon of gas at the pump, they want open borders, they want to take away your health insurance and they want to take away your guns,” the Texas senator continued.
© Provided by MediaDC: Washington Newspaper Publishing Company, Inc.
Cruz asserted the Democratic candidates’ policy proposals are “designed to resonate in the faculty lounges at an Ivy League college” and challenged Stephanopoulos to find one working American who supports their agenda.
“I think Donald Trump has broken the Democratic party,” Cruz said. “They are defined now just by hating him. They ought to be the party of jobs. They used to be a party focused on jobs, they’re not anymore.”

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Principal Delivers, Amazon Problems, CA Fires: Partner News | Patch

community corner Shared from Across America, US Principal Delivers, Amazon Problems, CA Fires: Patch Partner News California’s peak fire months are coming, Amazon has delivery problems, a Denver principal helps deliver a teacher’s baby:. By Colin Miner, Patch Staff Sep 13, 2019 1:34 pm ET {{ replyButtonLabel }} Reply {{ replyCount }} Patch readers generate more than 80 million reads a month. If you want your contact out there, become a Patch Partner. (Patch Graphic) Every day, Patch brings stories to its readers from more than a dozen news and information partners. These organizations contributing to Patch range from Kaiser Health News to the Racine County Eye to Chalkbeat – and others, both local and national.
As much as a news organization, Patch is a publishing platform that would love to share your thoughts, ideas and information, too. Here is just a sample of some recent posts. If you’d like to appear on the Patch platform, and have your work be among the stories that attract more than 80 million reads each month, contact colin.miner@patch.com.
Feds Try To Block Philly’s Supervised Injection Site By Kaiser Health News
Philadelphia could become the first U.S. city to offer opioid users a place to inject drugs under medical supervision. But lawyers for the Trump administration are trying to block the effort, citing a 1980s-era law known as “the crackhouse statute.”
Justice Department lawyers argued in federal court Thursday against the nonprofit, Safehouse, which wants to open the site.
U.S. Attorney William McSwain , in a rare move, argued the case himself. He said Safehouse’s intended activities would clearly violate a portion of the federal Controlled Substances Act that makes it illegal to manage any site for the purpose of unlawfully using a controlled substance. The statute was added to the broader legislation in the mid-1980s at the height of the crack cocaine epidemic in American cities.
READ MORE HERE
What To Know As California’s Peak Fire Months Loom By CalMatters
History shows that September and October, with their hot, fierce winds, are the state’s worst times for fire
California fire officials have learned through hard experience to temper their optimism.
Having just endured more than a decade of rampaging fires — 14 of the 20 most destructive fires in state history have occurred since 2007 — fire bosses say this year the glass is half-full.
“We’ve got a few things going for us at the moment,” said Scott McLean, a spokesman for Cal Fire, the state firefighting agency. “We still have a snowpack. Our upper elevations haven’t dried out. Because of that, we are able to continue our fuel-reduction projects.”
READ MORE HERE
AZ Panel Questions Officials On Efforts To Help Native Women By Cronkite News
Arizona lawmakers questioned administration officials Wednesday on what they are doing to deal with the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women — and they weren’t always satisfied with the answer.
Officials with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the departments of Justice and Health and Human Services said they’re trying, but are often hampered by a lack of funding and inconsistent record-keeping when it comes to crimes against Native women.
“A missing person report that comes in isn’t necessarily a crime when it’s reported to one of our police departments out there, so we have to treat those with more … more of a response,” said Charles Addington, deputy director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Office of Justice Services.
READ MORE HERE
A Chicago Truck Delivering Holiday Packages; A Crash; A Family Never The Same By ProPublica
On the corner of 28th Street and Drake Avenue in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood, the family of Telesfora Escamilla created a shrine for their mother, decorating a tree with silk flowers, ribbons and Our Lady of Guadalupe candles.
Escamilla was in a crosswalk at that intersection three days before Christmas in 2016 when a driver delivering Amazon packages in a cargo van turned left and hit her. She died that day, two weeks shy of her 85th birthday.
The delivery driver, who was working for an Amazon contractor at the height of the holiday rush , was indicted on a felony charge of reckless homicide but was acquitted in a bench trial this summer. Escamilla’s children are suing Amazon, the contractor and the driver. The driver declined to comment; the contractor did not return calls seeking comment; and Amazon declined to comment.
READ MORE HERE
Denver Principal, Dean Deliver Teacher’s Baby — At School A new school year always means new beginnings, but one Denver middle school community took that more literally than most.
Sixth-grade reading teacher Lindsay Agbalokwu was expecting her first baby in early September, but when she woke up with mild contractions Tuesday, she wasn’t sure if she was really in labor. She went to work anyway at DSST: Conservatory Green, a charter school in northeast Denver.
But by the time the school’s morning assembly had wrapped up, it was clear that Agbalokwu wouldn’t be finishing out the day. Seventh-grade teacher Marissa Kast rushed to get her car, as Principal Natalie Lewis and Dean Chris Earls helped Agbalokwu down the stairs and out of the building.
READ MORE HERE
If you work at a news organization or a nonprofit and would like to partner with Patch, contact Patch’s Manager of News and Content Partnerships, Colin Miner, at Colin.Miner@Patch.com
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