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EarthLink – News

Berlin’s much-delayed new airport to open Oct. 31 next year
Fri, November 29, 2019 12:22 EST
BERLIN (AP) — Berlin’s much-delayed new airport has a new opening date: Oct. 31, 2020. That is nine years later than the date envisioned when construction started in 2006.
The operator of the German capital’s airports announced the date on Friday.
The new BER airport has defied all clichés of German efficiency: construction problems and technical delays saw the date pushed back repeatedly — most dramatically in 2012, when the opening was canceled just four weeks before it was supposed to happen.
The delays have left Berlin relying on two small, aging and increasingly crowded Cold War-era airports: Tegel, which served West Berlin, and Schoenefeld, just outside the city limits, which was communist East Berlin’s airport.
The operator had previously said that it aimed to open the new airport next October but had stopped short of committing itself to a specific date.
Airport boss Engelbert Luetke Daldrup said that the move to the new airport will be phased.
Flights to and from Tegel, the busier of the existing two airports, are scheduled to end on Nov. 8, 2020, but airlines will continue to use the existing Schoenefeld terminal, across the tarmac from the new airport, for some time.
“We still have 11 months of hard work in front of us,” Luetke Daldrup said. A test phase of systems at the airport will run from April to October, “then BER can be opened safely and reliably,” he added.

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Albania calls for international help to recover from quake
By LLAZAR SEMINI | Sun, December 1, 2019 06:01 EST
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — Albania’s prime minister said Sunday he has called on the international community financial aid and expert assistance to help the country recover from a 6.4 magnitude earthquake that killed 51 persons and left thousands homeless.
Prime Minister Edi Rama said the government was reshaping the budget to help deal with the crisis but that the country also needs international support.
“Simply, this is humanly impossible to do this (reconstruction) alone,” Rama said at a regular morning Cabinet meeting.
Rama met with a group of ambassadors Saturday evening, including representatives from the European Union, United States, Turkey and Japan, and delivered the same message to them, he told his ministers.
Tuesday’s quake that hit Albania’s Adriatic coast also injured more than 3,000 people and left thousands homeless. The worst hit areas were the port town of Durres, a popular beach vacation spot for Albanians 33 kilometers (20 miles) west of the capital Tirana, and the nearby northern town of Thumane.
Already, civil engineers from EU countries and the U.S., along with local experts, have started to assess the quake damage. The clean-up process is already underway and some seriously damaged homes and hotels are being demolished.
The three quake-hit districts of Tirana, Durres and Lezha, remain in a state of emergency and authorities there still have not decided when schools will reopen.
Durres Mayor Valbona Sako resigned Sunday morning after making remarks on Saturday that she was “pleased” only 50 people had died in the earthquake, saying that poor construction, building code violations and corruption were much to blame.
The choice of words prompted a public outcry, with people accusing her of being insensitive so soon after the earthquake. Another person passed away from their injuries after the remarks to bring the death toll to 51.
About 2,500 left homeless by the quake are sheltered in tourist hotels, while hundreds remain in tents and hundreds more have been taken to neighboring Kosovo.
Meantime, repeated aftershocks have convinced many to flee the area for the east of the country.

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19 dead in Siberia after bus plunges onto frozen river
Sun, December 1, 2019 06:34 EST
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian emergency officials say 19 people were killed when their bus plunged off a bridge onto a frozen river in eastern Siberia.
Another 22 people were injured in the Sunday accident, Russian news agencies cited the Emergencies Ministry as saying.
Initial investigation indicates that a front wheel on the bus failed as it was crossing a bridge over the Kuenga River about 4,900 kilometers (3,100 miles) east of Moscow.
The coach-style bus landed upside down on the ice, collapsing the passenger compartment.

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Mountain village embraces its legacy as cure center for TB
By MICHAEL HILL | Sun, December 1, 2019 11:50 EST
SARANAC LAKE, N.Y. (AP) — Tuberculosis put Saranac Lake on the map.
Through the middle of the 20th century, ailing people seeking a “rest cure” reclined on cottage porches in the community to take in the crisp Adirondack Mountain air. Saranac Lake grew into a mini-metropolis of medical care, with a dozen trains chugging in and out daily, a famous mountainside tuberculosis sanitorium, hotels — and three undertakers.
“It was a bustling place,” said 89-year-old Howard Riley, who worked more than seven decades ago as a “tray boy,” delivering food to patients. “Very, very upbeat. And that might sound funny to somebody else, because the whole place was built on a disease.”
The local boom ended with the rise of effective antibiotic treatment, but residents still honor the village’s novel legacy. This year, the local history group purchased the old home and medical office of TB treatment pioneer Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau for conversion into additional museum space.
Separately, developers purchased the sprawling site of Trudeau’s sanitorium with plans to refurbish and reuse buildings integral to the area’s past as a magnet for sick people.
“It’s just still really a big part of our identity,” said Amy Catania, executive director of Historic Saranac Lake.
Spread by coughs and sneezes, tuberculosis typically attacks the lungs and was among the deadliest diseases a century ago. Fever, fatigue and an awful cough are common symptoms.
Trudeau was among the sufferers who came to the Adirondack Mountains in the 19th century in the belief that rest and mountain air could help control the disease. The young doctor’s health improved and he moved to Saranac Lake. He opened the Adirondack Cottage Sanitorium in 1884, beginning a literal cottage industry that lasted 70 years.
At its height, an estimated 2,000 or more patients at a time would stay locally at privately run cottages and larger institutions like the Trudeau Sanitorium, named for its founder after his death in 1915 after battling the disease for decades.
Hundreds of old “cure cottages” still stand along the hilly streets. Many are residential homes, their distinctive open porches now enclosed. Riley pointed them out during a recent drive through the snow-covered village.
“Here’s a cure cottage,” he said, from behind the wheel. “So is this. I mean, they’re all over the place.”
Many patients were young men and women, who still tend to be at high risk for the disease. Some stayed in bed. Others were “up patients” who could maybe take a walk for exercise. They reclined in the open air, bundling up in fur coats when it became cold.
“You couldn’t go near them. You could walk up onto the cure porch. They all knew your names and you knew theirs because it was like a big family and they were so young. … You’d tell them about your day,” said Natalie Leduc, now 89. “They were so anxious to hear everything on the outside.”
Death cast a long shadow here, but a surprising number of patients shared sunny memories later on.
Anne Irene Remis, who came to Trudeau at age 23 in 1939, called her decade at Trudeau “some of the happiest years of my life.” In her contribution to the 2002 book “Portrait of Healing,” she wrote fondly about fresh air, friends and kind doctors. doctor prescribing the proper shade of lipstick to match her pajamas.
Riley and Leduc say they loved living in a busy town. Leduc met movie star James Cagney when he visited a local sanitorium that served people in show business. Riley, in addition to delivering food to patients, would run errands to buy them candy bars and — of all things — cigarettes.
Both were subjected to regular chest X-rays at the local school. Riley was unfazed.
“I never even thought of getting TB,” Riley said. “I mean, it never crossed my mind.”
Then antibiotics came along, and the bottom fell out.
“That was a wonderful thing for humanity, but a terrible thing for our local economy,” Catania said.
Trudeau discharged its last patient in 1954 and was purchased several years later by a corporate training group to host seminars. Cure cottages became homes. The show business hospital became housing for seniors. Leduc lives there now.
Saranac Lake is a more traditional tourist town today, a snow globe village surrounded by mountains and lakes.
The area’s past as a TB haven is highlighted at the Saranac Laboratory Museum, a brick building that was once Trudeau’s lab. Historic Saranac Lake operates the museum and this past spring bought Trudeau’s former home and medical practice next door. It is raising $1.7 million for a rehabilitation of new space.
The Trudeau name lives on here through the Trudeau Institute, dedicated to the study of infectious disease. And Trudeau’s great-grandson, “Doonesbury” comic strip creator Garry Trudeau, provides art annually for the village’s Winter Carnival.
People can drive through grounds of the 64-acre TB sanitorium, where dozens of buildings are unused.
Developer Wayne Zukin, part of the group that bought the site this fall, said its first goal this winter is to stabilize the buildings. Different buildings on the grounds could possibly be used for retail, residences, a chef-driven inn or a brewery, he said.
“We want to save these buildings by putting them to use,” he said.

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South Dakota airplane crash kills 9 in extended family
By JAMES MacPHERSON | Sun, December 1, 2019 07:55 EST
Nine members of an extended Idaho family died when their plane crashed in a South Dakota field as they were heading home after a hunting trip.
Travis Garza, president of the wellness company Kyani, said in a Facebook post Sunday that the crash near Chamberlain Saturday afternoon killed brothers and founders Jim and Kirk Hansen. Garza said the crash also killed their father, Jim Hansen Sr.; Kirk Hansen’s children, Stockton and Logan; his sons-in-law, Kyle Taylor and Tyson Dennert; and Jim Hansen’s son, Jake, and grandson, Houston.
Garza identified the injured as Kirk’s son, Josh, and Jim’s son, Matt, and son-in-law, Thomas Long. All three were hospitalized.
The Hansens were executives with Kyani, which markets nutritional, health and wellness products, as well as with petroleum products distributor Conrad & Bischoff and KJ’s Super Stores.
East Idaho News, which first identified the victims, reported that the party had been on a hunting trip to South Dakota, one of the nation’s top destinations for pheasants.
Brian Wood, owner of a funeral home in Idaho Falls, lamented the deaths on Facebook. He called the Hansens “pillars of our community” and wrote that they had offered many times over the years to help pay expenses for someone who might not be able to afford it.
“Our community has a dark cloud over it now,” Wood wrote. “They will never know the many lives they touched.”
Twelve people were aboard the Pilatus PC-12 bound for Idaho Falls when it crashed within a mile after takeoff in Chamberlain about 12:30 p.m. Saturday, National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Peter Knudson said.
Federal investigators — one from Washington, D.C., and two from the Chicago area — likely would reach the crash site on Monday, Knudson said. Local authorities were guarding the site on Sunday.
Chamberlain and parts of South Dakota were under a winter storm warning Saturday and Brule County emergency manager Katheryn Benton said planes were unable to land at Chamberlain at the time of the crash.
Weather will be among several factors investigators will review, although no cause for the crash has been determined, Knudson said.

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