World War Two bomb detonated in Frankfurt's river – BBC News

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World War Two bomb detonated in Frankfurt’s river – BBC News

World War Two bomb detonated in Frankfurt’s river 14 April 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright @MartinMarinov1/Twitter Image caption The 250kg (550lb) device was detonated underwater early on Sunday A World War Two-era US bomb has been detonated in a river in Frankfurt, causing water to spurt high into the air, German media report.
Some 600 people were evacuated from parts of the city as bomb disposal experts got to work at about 08:00 local time (06:00 GMT) on Sunday.
Following the explosion, divers were sent to check that the device was safe.
The bomb was discovered on Tuesday in Frankfurt’s River Main, German news agency dpa reports.
Divers with the city’s fire service were participating in a routine training exercise when they found the 250kg (550lb) device.
An image posted on social media showed what appeared to be a large water fountain jetting into the air between two bridges.
It is not uncommon for bombs and other war munitions to turn up in Germany.

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World War Two bomb detonated in Frankfurt’s river – BBC News

World War Two bomb detonated in Frankfurt’s river 14 April 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright @MartinMarinov1/Twitter Image caption The 250kg (550lb) device was detonated underwater early on Sunday A World War Two-era US bomb has been detonated in a river in Frankfurt, causing water to spurt high into the air, German media report.
Some 600 people were evacuated from parts of the city as bomb disposal experts got to work at about 08:00 local time (06:00 GMT) on Sunday.
Following the explosion, divers were sent to check that the device was safe.
The bomb was discovered on Tuesday in Frankfurt’s River Main, German news agency dpa reports.
Divers with the city’s fire service were participating in a routine training exercise when they found the 250kg (550lb) device.
An image posted on social media showed what appeared to be a large water fountain jetting into the air between two bridges.
It is not uncommon for bombs and other war munitions to turn up in Germany.

Read More…

Pete Buttigieg formally announces 2020 presidential run | Fox News

Pete Buttigieg , the mayor of South Bend, Ind., who has seen his poll numbers surge in recent weeks, officially declared on Sunday that he's running for president – in a speech where he highlighted both his progressive values and Midwestern upbringing. “I ran for mayor in 2011 knowing that nothing like Studebaker would ever come back—but believing that we would, our city would, if we had the courage to reimagine our future,” Buttigieg said in a speech inside South Bend's Studebaker auto plant. “And now, I can confidently say that South Bend is back.”
He added: “There’s a long way for us to go. Life here is far from perfect. But, we’ve changed our trajectory, and shown a path forward for communities like ours.”
The 37-year-old Afghanistan War veteran, who has been exploring a White House run since January, now joins the field of a dozen-plus rivals and one that is likely to reach 20 or more.
Over the past few months, Buttigieg has appeared frequently on national TV news and talk shows and developed a strong social media following with his message that the country needs “a new generation of leadership.”
“[The future] calls for hopeful, audacious voices in our community,” Buttigieg said on Sunday. “And, yes, it calls for a new generation of leadership in this country.”
Video Buttigieg's poll numbers have climbed. Some polls put him behind only Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who sought the party's nomination in 2016, and former Vice President Joe Biden, who has not yet said he's running.
Buttigieg's campaign raised more than $7 million in the first three months of this year, a total eclipsed by Sanders' leading $18 million but more than Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Cory Booker of New Jersey, among others.
His challenge: finding a way to sustain the momentum over the long term and avoiding becoming a “flavor-of-the-month” candidate. Scrutiny of his leadership in South Bend has increased, as has his criticism of Vice President Mike Pence, who was Indiana's governor when Buttigieg was in his first term as mayor.
Buttigieg would be the first openly gay nominee of a major presidential party; he married his husband, Chasten, last year. He would be the first mayor to go directly to the White House. And, he would be the youngest person to become president, turning 39 the day before the next inauguration, on Jan. 20, 2021. Theodore Roosevelt was 42 when he took office, while John F. Kennedy was 43 and Bill Clinton 46.
Buttigieg argued that the best way for Democrats to defeat President Trump may be to nominate a mayor experienced in helping to revive a Midwestern city once described as “dying,” rather than a politician who has spent years “marinating” in Washington.
Video He has criticized Trump's campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again,” saying the way to move the country forward is not to look backward or cling to nostalgia or an old way of life.
“We have changed our trajectory,” Buttigieg said. “That’s why I’m here today to tell a different story than ‘Make America Great Again.”
He added: “There is no such thing as honest politics that includes the word 'again.'”
South Bend, which neighbors the University of Notre Dame, was hit hard by the decline of manufacturing, dating to the 1963 closing of the Studebaker auto plant that costs thousands of residents their jobs.
Video The hulking, dilapidated factory loomed over the city for much of the past 60 years as what Buttigieg called a daily reminder of South Bend's city's past.
Buttigieg gave his speech inside that building, which underwent a multimillion-dollar renovation led by a private developer with help from state grants and tax increment financing from the city. The newly remodeled structure is now part of a mixed-use technology center outside the city's downtown.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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The rise of ‘presenteeism’ in the workplace – BBC News

Image caption Dale Garbacki works for Dixons Carphone How many times have you gone in to work when you’re really not up to it?
It’s called presenteeism and it’s on the rise.
A study by health insurer Vitality has found that more than 40% of employees said their work was being affected by health problems – a figure that’s risen by a third over the last five years.
It found that people are putting aside both mental and physical health problems to attend work.
And in its recent annual Health and Well-Being at Work Survey Report the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) also found evidence of unhealthy trends in the workplace.
The CIPD said more than four-fifths (83%) of its respondents had observed presenteeism in their organisation, and a quarter (25%) said the problem had got worse since the previous year.
Depression Sarah Mitchell-Hume didn’t know anything about mental health when she had a panic attack at her desk.
She was two years into her career in engineering recruitment, a job she absolutely loved, when she suddenly became unwell. Sarah was diagnosed with depression.
“I felt pressurised to go back to work, even though I was signed off sick,” she recalls.
“I was physically present but mentally I wasn’t doing anything. And I’d just zone out, there was nothing going on behind my eyes. I think I just cleared my inbox every day. It made me more ill. I should’ve been at home recovering.”
Image caption Sarah Mitchell-Hume kept working despite being signed off sick Aged 24, she was just starting her career when she felt like it had come to an end.
If you break a leg, it’s clear you need time off. Having a mental illness or suffering from workplace stress can be harder to spot. But Vitality’s research has shown that these are the biggest factors behind the growing problem of people turning up for work when they’re not fit enough to do their jobs.
Accelerating trend Vitality runs an annual survey, Britain’s Healthiest Workplace, involving 167 organisations and 32,000 staff. The aim is to understand and tackle poor health and wellbeing across the UK workforce.
Presenteeism is a clear and accelerating trend. It’s just one of a number of studies which have come to the same conclusion.
It’s obvious that if we’re not at our best, then we’re less productive employees.
When Dale Garbacki lost his wife in 2014, he hit rock bottom. He was her main carer as well as trying to hold down a full time job in technical support for Dixons Carphone.
“Productivity dropped to what I call bare minimums,” he now admits.
“I’d had several warnings. By finally reaching out to the company and having a private chat with one of my managers, about how I was feeling and what I was going through at home, the loss of my wife, he said ‘ah, why didn’t you tell me sooner. We’ll need to get you some help’.”
Whilst Ms Mitchell-Hume felt she had no support in her workplace and ultimately left her job, Mr Garbacki started a work sponsored fitness programme to help him turn things around.
He runs before work in his local park in Preston as well as working out in the company gym.
“I’m definitely a lot better than I was. Overall I feel better in myself. I have more positive and confident feelings and I actually look forward to each day.”
He has now earned his first ever full bonus.
‘Good business sense’ His employer has been on a journey, too.
Dixons Carphone’s Head of Corporate Social Responsibility, Kesah Trowell, had her work cut out trying to persuade her company to sponsor one of the UK’s biggest long distance treks or runs, the Race to the Stones.
It proved a huge success with its workers who took part, kick starting a raft of other wellbeing initiatives including Mr Garbacki’s bootcamp programme.
Image caption Kesah Trowell says wellbeing initiatives make business sense “It really does make good business sense,” says Ms Trowell.
“It’s important that we have happy, healthy and engaged workforce, particularly since we’re in a retail environment. “
She adds: “Technology makes it easy for people to hide behind their desks, their computers or their phones. It’s easier for more presenteeism than there would’ve been a few years ago. That’s why it’s important for us to manage this.”
Productivity puzzle Could reducing presenteeism help solve the UK’s chronic productivity puzzle?
“Absolutely,” says Vitality’s chief executive Neville Koopowitz.
Productivity is the main driver of long-term economic growth and living standards. But our workers aren’t anything like as efficient as they should be.
“Workplace stress and mental wellbeing has a massive impact. We believe presenteeism is the key issue to Britain’s productivity problem, where people are at work and not performing in an optimal way,” Mr Koopowitz says.
Ms Mitchell-Hume does freelance and voluntary work now as well as being a busy mother. She’s happy but she just wishes her employer had handled things differently.
“It was so incredibly difficult. A bit of compassion, empathy and flexibility would’ve made all the difference,” she says.
“The workplace can be a tough place to be. There’s so much more to be done to look after employees.”

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Worsening child poverty harms learning, say teachers – BBC News

Worsening child poverty harms learning, say teachers By Judith Burns Education reporter 14 April 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Increasing numbers of children in poverty find it harder to learn, say teachers Poverty is harming children’s capacity to learn and it’s getting worse, suggests a survey of teachers.
Pupils who go to school hungry from cramped, noisy homes where they can’t sleep properly, struggle to learn says the National Education Union (NEU).
“I try to teach my phonics group as I am giving others cereal to eat,” one teacher told NEU researchers.
Ministers say employment is at a record high, wages outstrip inflation and fewer people are in “absolute” poverty.
But the NEU says anecdotal evidence from its members suggests more families are falling into poverty.
“Government does not want to hear these stories from the frontline of teaching, but they must,” said NEU Joint General Secretary, Dr Mary Bousted.
“A decade of austerity has only served to place more children in poverty while at the same time destroying the support structures for poor families,” she added. Poverty causing ‘misery’ in UK, says UN official In-work poverty
More than 8,600 NEU members from across the UK responded to an online survey between March 20 and April 3.
Of these, an overwhelming 91% said poverty was a factor in limiting children’s capacity to learn, with almost half (49%) deeming it a major factor.
Among state school teachers, the figures rose to 97% and 52%.
Overall, half the teachers who responded said pupil poverty was worse than in 2016.
“The poverty gap has clearly got bigger,” one teacher told the researchers.
“A number of my pupils live in overcrowded housing where they are sharing rooms with small children or babies, and have disrupted sleep.
“One child has been referred to the school wellbeing team due to anxiety about their family’s financial situation,” said another.
Another reported that poverty was not necessarily confined to families where no one works but also affects homes with “parents working hard in jobs but still not able to get the basics”.
One commented: “The ones who are in crisis are not only the children whose parents do not work, but the ones who do.” ‘Bullied for being poor’
About three-quarters blamed poverty for children falling asleep in lessons, being unable to concentrate and behaving badly.
About half said their students had experienced hunger or ill health as a result of poverty, and more than a third said pupils were sometimes bullied for being poor.
“Most of my class arrive at school hungry and thirsty,” said one teacher.
Some teachers told the researchers that mufti days and dress-up days can be a source of shame for the poorest pupils, with some reluctant to come in because of negative comments or stares.
A teacher commented: “The rich children show off and those struggling with finances are really noticed by the other children.” Image caption With school budgets under pressure, some can no longer afford breakfast clubs
Older pupils are sometimes unable to afford course text books or calculators, and providing electronic copies doesn’t help pupils from homes without access to computers or the internet, the survey found.
Some teachers reported using their own money to buy snacks or new underwear for pupils, and sometimes schools help out by washing clothes or providing free breakfasts.
But budgets are increasingly stretched and one teacher reported that their school had recently had to axe its breakfast club.
England’s children’s minister, Nadhim Zahawi, said tackling disadvantage was a government priority, acknowledging “some families need extra help”.
“While all infant children can benefit from our universal free school meals programme, we are making sure that more than a million of the most disadvantaged children are also accessing free school meals throughout their education, saving families around £400 per year.
“We are also investing £9m to give more access to holiday clubs, where they can benefit from activities and a nutritious meal during the school break.” Related Topics

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